Does OVH/SoYouStart provide discounts for high volume customers?

I’m currently renting 5 servers with SoYouStart and paying a few hundred dollars per month for them. I was wondering if anybody knows if OVH… | Read the rest of https://www.webhostingtalk.com/showthread.php?t=1808907&goto=newpost

lo.logic – Customer Queueing Math Question: When does final customer exit service center? …. Single-Server With 4 Customers and 4 Service Times

My goal is to assess whether or not I did the queueing problem below correctly:

Let’s say I have a cheeky hypotheticl situation. Let’s say professional UFC fighters enter/arrive at a anabolic steroids injection center. Assume it operates as a single-server. Let’s say these fighters arrive at times 3, 6, 15, and 17.

Also let’s designate that it takes the server 7, 9, 6, and 8 minutes, respectively, to provide the steroid injections into our four athletes mentioned above. My question is: when does the final athlete (number 4) exit the center?

Below is my analysis:

i    arrive    start    service    leave     wait
1    3         3        7          10        0
2    6         10       9          19        4
3    15        19       6          25        4
4    17        25       8          33        8

Based on my analysis, the last customer (#4) left the shop after 33 minutes. Is this correct answer? Is my approach okay?

Only approved customers can access checkout if the aren’t approve they must wait for approval

I am new to WordPress but somehow I managed to do all my work. The main reason behind this question is to ensure that the company must sell its products to licensed persons only

  1. If the customer is not logged in he must login first, before accessing checkout
  2. If the customer is not registered he must be registered first, before accessing checkout
  3. If the customer is not approved he shall not be able to access WooCommerce checkout page

These are the things I want. Please help with this.

Chinese customers requesting Windows 2003

Hello everyone!

I would like to see if anyone else has experienced this phenomenon and maybe they have an idea why.
We receive many requests from Chin … | Read the rest of https://www.webhostingtalk.com/showthread.php?t=1808366&goto=newpost

Does offering long-term free services help attract and retain customers?

Some providers offer certain free tests or services for about a year.

Do you think it helps attract customers? If the services are necessary … | Read the rest of https://www.webhostingtalk.com/showthread.php?t=1806843&goto=newpost

Ecommerce: Registered Customers vs. Recurring Customers?

Registered customers are generally those who already have their information (address, payment, login, etc.) on file and / or have created an account, while returning customers are simply people who have visited your site, still have a cookie intact on your system, and / or anonymously purchased from you in the past.

Generally, "registered" implies that clients must log in at some point, but clients who "return" do not.

postgresql – Count returning customers with various conditions

I have PostgreSQL 9.6.10 and a table like this:

CREATE TABLE web.orders (id integer NOT NULL, user_id integer NOT NULL, status_id integer, created_at integer);

INSERT INTO web.orders(id, user_id, status_id, created_at) values (1, 1000, 1, 1577862000);
INSERT INTO web.orders(id, user_id, status_id, created_at) values (2, 1001, 1, 1577862000);
INSERT INTO web.orders(id, user_id, status_id, created_at) values (3, 1000, 5, 1577862000);
INSERT INTO web.orders(id, user_id, status_id, created_at) values (4, 1000, 1, 1583046000);
INSERT INTO web.orders(id, user_id, status_id, created_at) values (5, 1000, 5, 1583046000);
INSERT INTO web.orders(id, user_id, status_id, created_at) values (6, 1001, 5, 1583046000);
INSERT INTO web.orders(id, user_id, status_id, created_at) values (7, 1001, 5, 1583046000);
INSERT INTO web.orders(id, user_id, status_id, created_at) values (8, 1001, 5, 1585720800);
INSERT INTO web.orders(id, user_id, status_id, created_at) values (9, 1002, 5, 1577862000);
INSERT INTO web.orders(id, user_id, status_id, created_at) values (10, 1002, 1, 1577862000);
INSERT INTO web.orders(id, user_id, status_id, created_at) values (11, 1003, 1, 1577862000);
INSERT INTO web.orders(id, user_id, status_id, created_at) values (12, 1003, 5, 1577862000);

I have to summarize the number of customers who placed an order in the last month as repeat customers. status_id = 5 means a correct order. (Orders placed in the last month and earlier also with status_id = 5.)

What I managed to do is two separate queries like these:

-- last month:
select user_id from web.orders where (created_at between extract(epoch from date_trunc('month', now()) - '1 month'::interval) and extract(epoch from  date_trunc('month', now()))) and status_id = 5;

-- even older: 
select user_id from web.orders where (created_at < extract(epoch from date_trunc('month', now()) - '1 month'::interval)) and status_id = 5;

I experimented with IN operator, and subqueries, but no luck.

The appropriate answer for this data example would be & # 39; 1 & # 39; (user_id: 1000).

Any ideas?

mysql: I don't know some queries about how we do it, like how customers ask

The queries are as follows.

1- Given a medicare ID, list that patient's medical report.

2- Find the patients whose names begin with & # 39; J & # 39 ;, ordered by their first and last name.

3- List information about all the patients who have been admitted, grouped by their disease.

4- Find all the patients who have entered the Neurology department.

5- List the name and specialty of all the doctors who live in Montreal and worked or have been working for 1 year in this hospital.

6- Given a medicare ID, calculate the total sum of a person's expenses in this hospital. Suppose each admission costs $ 500 per night.

db scheme: https://ibb.co/25N1yk6 ent [enter the image description here] 1st picture description here

I try the first one with little knowledge like that
SELECT * from patient, medical report
where pid = medre_id
group by pid;

but this is what you ask
Thank you for helping

Comments on allowing customers to send emails from our hosting platform

Hello guys,

I hope everyone is doing well right now. I have a question for some of you who have experience offering accommodation to clients.

Our current setting is Control Panel (Plesk) with Sendgrid as email relay. We note that multiple clients are using mail forwarding and that emails are counted in Sendgrid as a send, including emails that can normally be considered spam if sent directly. Most of the clients have been forwarding to gmail. Over time, our Sendgrid reliability has decreased from 99% to 87% and is getting worse as we speak. I am also starting to notice that emails for legitimate php software go to the spam folder when I use sendmail.

Some questions on this topic:

– Should we continue to offer customers the option of forwarding mail? If yes / no, then why?
– If yes, how do large hosting companies allow it and still have a good reputation when email is not sent to spam?
– Is this a drawback that will ruin your email sending reputation?

We look forward to hearing from you and hearing your comments and experience.

Having trouble with ICANN domain verifications (customers won't)

Lately we've seen an increase in domain owners who don't verify their details as ICANN requires.
For us, about 10% of all customers will ignore the verification request, and about 8% will end up with the domain suspended, and that increases our customer service workload.

I'd say all of these people are real, but are afraid to click links in random emails (even though we report the email is coming).