What's the equivalent of click bait in the real world?

Hello friends,

What’s the equivalent of click bait in the real world?

game design – 3D World; how do I deal with the thickness of walls on a grid to create a tile based building system

I want to develop a tile based 3D building system as a foundation for an game. But there is a question which is cracking my mind a bit.

I am grateful for every thought, hint, link or book suggestion.

How do I deal with the thickness of walls on a grid, respectivelly how should I realize walls?

I used the search engine, watched at other games on steam & youtube, but the result & my conclusion is not really satisfying.

What is the most common way, which causes the least problems in your oppinion?

The game-engine i want to use is Godot.

This are the 3 options which I have, at least I think this are the 3 I have:

(1) Wall as a plane
Wall as a plane

I think this option causes not much problems, but it is also the least attractive option because it doesn’t look that great to a player.

The wall is flat, the positioning of items in front of the wall, on both sides shouldn’t make problems because. The wall has no thickness, so there is no offset related to the grid.

(2) Wall in size of the grid
Wall in size of the grid

I think this option causes the least problems, but probably you get really thick looking walls if your grid is to big & with a smaller grid you maybe get other problems (performance issues or something else).

The wall doesn’t affect the positioning of items in front of the wall, on both sides. The wall has thickness, but the thickness doesn’t results in an offset related to the grid.

Currently I think this is the option I should stick with, but to get walls which are not that thick, I believe I should create a grid with a size of .5 or .25 when you relate 1 to an meter (walls in germany are about 25 till 50 cm).

Maybe I worry too much about the size of the walls?

(3) Wall overlapping the grid
Wall overlapping the grid

I think this option makes the most headache, at least for me. With this option you have a offset resulting from the thickness of the wall. Because it’s overlapping the floor tiles half the walls thickness, so you have to deal with the placement of items in front of the wall & currently I have no idea to deal with.

world of darkness – Do “editions” of White Wolf products correspond?

White Wolf has published a variety of product lines. Each product line has multiple editions. Do the editions of various games line up intuitively?

For example, I have a smattering of books from both Werewolf: The Apocalypse and Wraith: The Oblivion. Both games have a first edition, second edition, and 20th anniversary edition (Werewolf additionally has a Revised edition that does not seem to correspond to anything in Wraith).

In other games with which I’m familiar the editions would line up nicely. For example, in Dungeons and Dragons there are Ravenloft books for 2nd edition D&D and 5th edition D&D. There are also Planescape books for 2nd edition. The Planescape 2e and Ravonloft 2e books are in some sense “related” because they refer to the same rule set.

Is this true for White Wolf products? I’m confused because the periods in which they are published don’t overlap. Werewolf 1e was published between 1992 – 1993, while Wraith 1e was published in 1994 – 1995. Second edition Werewolf started in 1994, but second edition Wraith started in 1996.

product identification – Is there an easy way to know what edition a World of Darkness sourcebook is?

2nd page of most WoD books > date of printing vs date of edition releases.

or on WW wiki:

https://whitewolf.fandom.com/wiki/List_of_World_of_Darkness_sourcebooks

As to the “by looking at cover” question:

In combination with wiki, a google image search of the “ibsn” listed on wiki for cover of book in question

This LINK is the CoD or “Chronicle of Darkness”, It lists every date of publication/edition & would be the source I would quot, So I feel linking it is more direct

Note that “Paradox Interactive” now owns the “WoD” (2015 to date of this edit) with stated plans to (re)release rules under “One World of Darkness” unifying rule set.

Following the purchase of White Wolf and the World of Darkness by
Paradox Interactive in 2015, Paradox unveiled their plans to create
One World of Darkness“, unifying all fans and versions of the World
of Darkness under one umbrella. In December of that year, the “new”
World of Darkness saw its name changed to “Chronicles of Darkness” to
more fully distinguish it from the “classic” World of Darkness. Onyx
Path will continue to produce new material for the CoD setting
(including the aforementioned second editions and new game lines), and
Paradox’s reestablished White Wolf studio will develop new editions of
the classic World of Darkness setting in-house.

I take this to mean 2nd edition is the superseding-ly “Current” rule set for the WoD (now CoD), until a “unified system release”

Below is the most current IN PRINT release I could locate:

The Huntsmen Chronicle – The second edition of Changeling: The Lost. A
game of bittersweet truth. Released in January 2019.

world of darkness – Is there an easy way to know what edition a sourcebook is?

2nd page of most WoD books > date of printing vs date of edition releases.

or on WW wiki:

https://whitewolf.fandom.com/wiki/List_of_World_of_Darkness_sourcebooks

As to the “by looking at cover” question:

In combination with wiki, a google image search of the “ibsn” listed on wiki for cover of book in question

This LINK is the CoD or “Chronicle of Darkness”, It lists every date of publication/edition & would be the source I would quot, So I feel linking it is more direct

Note that “Paradox Interactive” now owns the “WoD” (2015 to date of this edit) with stated plans to (re)release rules under “One World of Darkness” unifying rule set.

Following the purchase of White Wolf and the World of Darkness by
Paradox Interactive in 2015, Paradox unveiled their plans to create
One World of Darkness“, unifying all fans and versions of the World
of Darkness under one umbrella. In December of that year, the “new”
World of Darkness saw its name changed to “Chronicles of Darkness” to
more fully distinguish it from the “classic” World of Darkness. Onyx
Path will continue to produce new material for the CoD setting
(including the aforementioned second editions and new game lines), and
Paradox’s reestablished White Wolf studio will develop new editions of
the classic World of Darkness setting in-house.

I take this to mean 2nd edition is the superseding-ly “Current” rule set for the WoD (now CoD), until a “unified system release”

Below is the most current IN PRINT release I could locate:

The Huntsmen Chronicle – The second edition of Changeling: The Lost. A
game of bittersweet truth. Released in January 2019.

How do all the World of Darkness and Chronicles of Darkness RPGs connect?

WoD and CoD are not connected in any canon way. CoD is merely a spiritual successor of the WoD in many regards and at times shares names – which lead to some of the worst Edition Wars ever fought when CoD 1st Edition still claimed to be the (new) World of Darkness and many diehard fans refused to even look at the new products…

In the background, there was a huge rights kerfuffle, White Wolf died & got sold several times, and the Pen&Paper rights ended up at Onyx Path.timeline fuzzy The Time of Judgement books were widely ignored by many fans and they fueled Kickstarters to bring back their old games of the WoD as the 20th century reprint/update. To distinguish the two systems, the (new) World of Darkness got rebranded to Chronicles of Darkness in 2015, a short time after the God Machine Chronicle update to the 2nd Edition… and it’s technically retroactive.

Likewise, the Storytelling system is a spiritual successor of the Storyteller system. On a side note, the Storyteller system is a spiritual successor of Shadowrun, altering its d6 to d10 and removing the exploding dice from normal rolls.

WoD

Inside the WoD, all the splats inhabit the same world, and conflict between them is commonly referenced in all the splats books. The scope of the game is much wider: There is a global conspiracy from each splat, the wars are global, conflicts are aeons old and many cornerstones are set deep in the canon of the game. Each Splat comes with either a line it is tied to or it is a fully splat with a core book of its own. Crossplay compatibility is somewhat low, as systems are largely incompatible, but the backdrop of the world is completely shared.

The vast power-level differences though lead to huge fanboy-fights about which was the best Splat to wipe out all the others. Demons and Mummies always won for they came back.

As in cross-referencing, the three main lines (Vampire, Werewolf and Mage) regularly made referencing to one another, and starting 2nd edition even contained stats for these splats when used as adversaries ported to the relative system.

Wraith’s end was referenced heavily in Mage revised and became the start point for both Demon the Fallen as well as the last iteration of Mummy: the great Avatar Storm was what destroyed the Wraiths, released the Fallen and came right before the new life spell for the Amite.

Changeling is only passingly noted in Werewolf publications, usually when Arcadia is described.

Expansions into previously nondescript areas or times came somewhat close together: the “Hengeyokai – Shapeshifters of the East” came together with “Kindred of the East”, both detailing those splats that are at home in eastern Asia in 1998 under the label of the “Year of the Lotus”. They included inter-splat Metaplots.

These Metaplots of the WoD also had often larger impact like the Year of the Reckoning (1999) ending the Wraith line and introducing the Hunter: the reckoning. The Year of the Scarab (2001) was focussing on the Middle East and brought Mummy the Resurrection as a semi-standalone splat (some basic rules had to be taken from either a Vampire, Werewolf or Mage core book). Year of the Damned (2002) introduced the Fallen Demons/Demons. In these plots, the places and plots are detailed from several sides and the stance of the new elements was brought in.

The end result of these Metaplots was meant to be the Time of Judgement (2003/4), which brought the canonical end of the WoD. Following the plot, the WoD is destroyed but how exactly is dependant on the players.1

20th Anniversary

As the game aged, the 20th-Anniversary edition was made as a fix-up of the game system with a mix of 2nd and revised edition fluff. A lot of edition inconsistencies of the crunch were smoothed out. The general tone stayed, but at times it was modernized for a world that had aged and became considerably more technologically advanced.

The different splats are not really compatible with one another still, as each splat follows vastly different systems for their splat-specific systems, but it has become somewhat less of a headache.

5th Edition

The 5th edition is a rather recent upcoming. It is meant to bring a new system that still has the old roots, but so far only Vampire has made the release and I have not taken an in-depth look at that. So I can just say “it exists and critics are divide about it”. It is probably more of a Darker-and-Edgier Reboot.

CoD

The basic idea of all splats inhabiting the same world is also true for the CoD, but now the fanboy fights were dulled a lot as the system was much more streamlined. It was designed from the mortal up, not the supernatural down, and tried to even the playing field between Splats. The mechanics for a similar effect are often similar among different splats making cross-splat play easier.

The scope of the game is much narrower: instead of a global conflict with cornerstone figures and an ages old history, the game is set much more local, the backdrop is often fuzzier, and it goes much more to modern punk.

CoD 1e & 2e

CoD 1e and 2e are connected via the God Machine Chronicle plot, which somehow reminds of the Metaplots of the WoD, but is mostly meant to explain the changes to the background between the two editions and to gloss over the mechanics changes.

If you are interested in the history of one specific game, that’d be an excellent history-of-gaming question.

Even with the new products, the WoD stays not connected in game or easily compatible with the CoD but for how it was explained here.


1 – In a nutshell, the games refused to die in the player heads and transitioning to the new World of Darkness (later rebranded Chronicles of Darkness) didn’t happen as planned. Some Authors pulled their IP rights from White Wolf and sat on them till they banded together with others and Onyx Path and did the Kickstarter for 20th century.

world of darkness – What level of Prime is required to use Tass?

I’m confused about what level of Prime is required to use Tass in the Mage 20th Anniversary Edition rules.

In the main rulebook the following statements are made:

M20 Rulebook:

  • p 332: “To absorb Quintessence energy from the materialized Quintessence of Tass requires Prime 3.”

  • p 520: Prime 1 sphere description says: “A beginning study of Prime allows the mage to perceive and channel Quintessence from Nodes, Tass, …”

  • p 520: Prime 3 sphere description says: “… the Prime-skilled mage can draw both free and raw Quintessence from Nodes, Junctures (special times) and Tass …”

How do you DO That Rulebook says:

  • pp. 43-45: “Any mage with an Avatar Background can absorb that Background’s worth of Quintessence from a Node or Tass …”

First off – are there ways to use Tass other than absorbing the Quintessence into your pattern? Can you spend Tass to gain Quintessence effects like lowering the difficulty of a roll without absorbing it into your pattern?

And with regard to what levels of Prime are required to do these things, I can see support for any of these positions:

  1. You don’t need any Prime at all to absorb Quintessence from Tass into your pattern, as “Any mage with an Avatar Background” can do it (How do you DO That pp. 43-45)
  2. You need Prime 1, as the description for that sphere says Prime 1 allows you to channel Quintessence from Tass. (M20 p. 520)
  3. You need Prime 3, as that is stated on M20 p. 332 and p. 520 explicitly

I have reviewed other answers at: How does the Prime Sphere affect gaining and storing Quintessence in M20? but it left me more confused than enlightented.

From a gameplay perspective, requiring Prime 3 to use Tass seems to defeat much of the purpose of Tass – as it can’t be readily exchanged between mages as portable Quintessence unless they have Prime 3.

world of darkness – How can I maximize the value of Appearance for a sidhe?

I am preparing a character for my first Changeling:The Dreaming second edition game. I’ve opted for a sidhe, which come with this ability:

Sidhe get two extra dots of Appearance during character creation, even if this increases scores above 5.

Starting with an attribute of 7 sounds pretty incredible, so I’d like to maximize the value of my Appearance. I’m having some trouble:

  • I don’t see any attributes which obviously synergize with my high Appearance.
  • None of the Arts in the core rules are based on Appearance.
  • The only task I’ve seen which calls for Appearance is seduction.

How can I maximize the value of my abnormally high Appearance score? Assume nothing about the rest of the party (our characters will meet for the first time at the table). Anything published for Changeling: The Dreaming second edition is allowed, but I myself was only able to search the core rules.

world of darkness – Prime sphere requirements to use Tass in Mage 20th Anniversary Edition

I’m confused about what level of Prime is required to use Tass in the Mage 20th Anniversary Edition rules.

In the main rulebook the following statements are made:

M20 Rulebook:

  • p 332: “To absorb Quintessence energy from the materialized Quintessence of Tass requires Prime 3.”

  • p 520: Prime 1 sphere description says: “A beginning study of Prime allows the mage to perceive and channel Quintessence from Nodes, Tass, …”

  • p 520: Prime 3 sphere description says: “… the Prime-skilled mage can draw both free and raw Quintessence from Nodes, Junctures (special times) and Tass …”

How do you DO That Rulebook says:

  • pp. 43-45: “Any mage with an Avatar Background cab absorb that Background’s worth of Quintessence from a Node or Tass …”

First off – are there ways to use Tass other than absorbing the Quintessence into your pattern? Can you spend Tass to gain Quintessence effects like lowering the difficulty of a roll without absorbing it into your pattern?

And with regard to what levels of Prime are required to do these things, I can see support for any of these positions:

  1. You don’t need any Prime at all to absorb Quintessence from Tass into your pattern, as “Any mage with an Avatar Background” can do it (How do you DO That pp. 43-45)
  2. You need Prime 1, as the description for that sphere says Prime 1 allows you to channel Quintessence from Tass. (M20 p. 520)
  3. You need Prime 3, as that is stated on M20 p. 332 and p. 520 explicitly

I have reviewed other answers at: How does the Prime Sphere affect gaining and storing Quintessence in M20? but it left me more confused than enlightented.

From a gameplay perspective, requiring Prime 3 to use Tass seems to defeat much of the purpose of Tass – as it can’t be readily exchanged between mages as portable Quintessence unless they have Prime 3.

modding – How do I add custom logic to a World of Warcraft internal LUA event using an addon?

I’m trying to show a bit of custom text directly after mount names in the World of Warcraft Mount Journal. I’ve exported the Blizzard API code from the World of Warcraft client, found the method I want to override, copied it to my addon and attempted to register it as a replacement script using MountJournal.ListScrollFrame:SetScript(). However, this doesn’t appear to be working.

I’ve done some investigating, and apparently I need to some magic involving frames and registering events? I’m not sure.

My addon source code can be found at https://github.com/nzall/WarcraftTransportAcquisitionRating/blob/master/warcraftTransportAcquisitionRating.lua. The relevant part that I’m fairly sure is broken can be found below. I’m using Ace to simplify development.

function wTAR:OnEnable()
    MountJournal.ListScrollFrame:SetScript("OnUpdate", MountJournal_UpdateMountList);    
end

What is the proper way to do what I’m trying to do? Or otherwise, if I’m trying to do the wrong thing, how should I do it instead?