dnd 5e – Can a Legendary monster ignore a Divination wizard’s Portent feature and choose to pass the save anyway?

Excellent question. Yes the legendary creature can still force a success.

How this works is portent needs to make the Legendary creature use the roll from itself before the roll is actually made, thus giving them a failing saving throw immediately. The legendary creature would then uses their legendary resistance which takes place after the roll is made and results determined, declaring the save a success as a replacement effect.

What does the wizard’s “Familiars” feature do?

Sometimes a rule is so poorly worded that part of it, in fact, doesn’t mean much (or mean anything at all). But in general, writing rules like this takes a lot of time and effort, and that means someone had to get paid for it. It’s probably supposed to mean something (even if that something sometimes is ‘repeating what was said somewhere else, because it’s also relevant here and someone might forget/miss it’).

So you shouldn’t even consider option #3 until you are very sure option #s 1 and 2 can’t work.

The description for the Elf’s “supernatural patrons” feature explicitly says elves get two spells for free. This is also explicitly mentioned in the description of the elven version of the “Magic” feature – which says they randomly know spells like wizards do, except they always know those two specific spells.

If in one place, the rules explicitly call out something like this happening, it’s usually a good idea to assume they’ll always call it out in the same way.

Furthermore, the spell list has a note saying that if a wizard rolls either patron bond or invoke patron, they learns both spells for the price of one spell slot. This would be completely meaningless if wizards got the spells for free implicitly, because they were mentioned in a feature.

In other words, because the find familiar description does not say ‘wizards get the spell automatically at first level, in addition to their other selections’, that means it doesn’t work that way.

The find familiar spell is called out specifically in a feature exclusive only to the wizard class. Only 3 spells get the special treatment of being called out by name in either the wizard or elf class. This supports the idea that find familiar gets special treatment.

So, what does happen if an elf rolls find familiar? The rules (at least, the version Google found marked ‘beta’) do not say. The wording implies that elves can’t have familiars, but they could explicitly spell it out, and they don’t.

But from an in-story perspective, it doesn’t make a lot of sense an elf would even want to bother with the spell. The supernatural patrons feature makes it clear the fact elves live for a long time has a big impact on their spellcasting.

This will interact very poorly with find familiar, which has a net loss to the caster of the familiar’s HP total, when said familiar dies. From the perspective of an elf, as opposed to a wizard, this is probably rather inevitable.

The most reasonable interpretation is that no elf would ever want or bother to learn find familiar, and therefore any elf PC who rolls it simply rolls again.

dnd 5e – Can the sorcerer’s Twinned Spell metamagic and the Enchantment wizard’s Split Enchantment feature be used at the same time?

Each description specifies targeting a second creature.

Each feature description is specific to state that you may “target a second creature”.

The first three ordinal numbers in English are first, second, and third; not first, second, and second. So if you target a third creature, you are contradicting both spell descriptions which specify you may only target a second creature.

You may only target up to two creatures, even if using both of these features.

But you can’t use them together anyway.

Each feature modifies the spell to target a second creature, so once you use one, your spell is no longer a valid for the other.

Double no.

While that Jeremy Crawford’s tweets are not official in any way, it may still be helpful to observe that he personally affirmed this particular ruling when he tweeted:

Split Enchantment and Twinned Spell are mutually exclusive. When you use one of them, the spell no longer targets only one creature.

dnd 5e – Can the Chronurgy wizard’s Chronal Shift feature be used when a creature uses Legendary Resistance to succeed on a saving throw?

The Chronurgy Magic wizard’s Chronal Shift feature (Explorer’s Guide to Wildemount, p. 184) says:

You can magically exert limited control over the flow of time around a creature. As a reaction, after you or a creature you can see within 30 feet of you makes an attack roll, an ability check, or a saving throw, you can force the creature to reroll. You make this decision after you see whether the roll succeeds or fails. The target must use the result of the second roll.

Can the Chronurgy wizard’s Chronal Shift feature be used when a creature uses Legendary Resistance to succeed on a saving throw?

Using the adult red dragon as an example, Legendary Resistance reads:

If the dragon fails a saving throw, it can choose to succeed instead.

Specifically, here is the scenario:

  1. Wizard casts a spell that requires a saving throw on Red Dragon
  2. Red Dragon rolls the saving throw and fails
  3. Red Dragon expends one use of legendary resistance to succeed on the saving throw
  4. Wizard uses their reaction to use Chronal Shift to force the dragon to reroll the saving throw
  5. Red Dragon rerolls the saving throw and fails
  6. Red Dragon expends a second use of legendary resistance to succeed the saving throw

In particular, is step 4 of this scenario a valid use of the Chronurgy wizard’s Chronal Shift feature?


For transparency, this question is a rewrite of this closed question, having this meta post about its closure. In response, I made this meta post that is more generally concerned with re-asking questions that were closed per our “don’t guess the system” policy. Please avoid any meta discussion on this post, instead relegating it to the relevant meta posts.

dnd 5e – Can the Chronurgy Wizard’s Chronal Shift ability be used when a creature passes a saving throw with Legendary Resistance?

From Explorer’s Guide to Wildemount, the Chronurgy Wizard’s Chronal Shift ability says:

You can magically exert limited control over the flow of time around a creature. As a reaction, after you or a creature you can see within 30 feet of you makes an attack roll, an ability check, or a saving throw, you can force the creature to reroll. You make this decision after you see whether the roll succeeds or fails. The target must use the result of the second roll.

Using the adult red dragon as an example, Legendary Resistance reads:

If the dragon fails a saving throw, it can choose to succeed instead.

Specifically, here is the scenario:

  1. Wizard casts saving throw spell on Red Dragon
  2. Red Dragon rolls the saving throw and fails
  3. Red Dragon expends one use of legendary resistance to succeed on the saving throw
  4. Wizard uses their reaction to use Chronal Shift to force the dragon to reroll the saving throw
  5. Red Dragon rerolls the saving throw and fails
  6. Red Dragon expends a second use of legendary resistance to succeed the saving throw

In particular, is step 4 of this scenario a valid use of the Chronurgy Wizard’s Chronal Shift ability?


For transparency, this question is a rewrite of this closed question, having this meta post about its closure. In response, I made this meta post that is more generally concerned with re-asking questions that were closed per our dont guess the system policy. Please avoid any meta discussion on this post, instead relegating it to the relevant meta posts.

dnd 5e – Chronurgist Wizard’s Chronal Shift at advantage/disadvantage

For Dnd 5e

During my session a player come under the effects of the Dominate Monster spell during a combat. The player, rolled at advantage as written in the spells description, but failed the Wisdom DC both times. The Chronurgist Wizard used his Chronal Shift to reroll as a reaction, but we debated if the roll should be at advantage or not.

I can’t find anything online that would contradict other wise, and the closest thing I can find from the PHB states:

”When you have advantage or disadvantage and ”something in the game”, such as the halfling’s Lucky trait, lets you reroll the d20, you can reroll only one of the dice”

So, how would Chronal Shift be applied in this instance? Would the played roll again at advantage, or would they roll a further 1d20? I personally made the ruling as it being 1d20.

dnd 5e – Does the “great weapon master” feat give wizards the ability to use heavy weapons in Dungeons and Dragons 5e

Great Weapon Master does not grant any proficiencies.

First, if the feat granted proficiency with any weapons, it would state that it granted proficiency with a weapon. It does not.

Second, the clause you quote is defining the condition under which one may use the second bullet of the feat:

Before you make a melee attack with a heavy weapon that you are proficient with…

It states “before you make a melee attack”, then defines parameters for that melee attack, specifically, that it must be made with a heavy weapon you are proficient with. If you do not have proficiency with a particular heavy weapon, you may not use the second bullet of GWM while making attacks with that particular weapon.

Does Pathfinder 2e fix the “linear fighters, quadratic wizards” problem?

This question about the playtest got the answer "we just do not know it yet".

50 weeks after the publication, what it the final answer? How does it compare to DnD 5e in this regard?

usability – Onboardings and wizards – should I show the steps of the process?

So I need to design onboarding screens for a credit card company. I started to look around on different onboardings and collect ideas from different products such as Lemonade, Forward, Grammarly etc.

I noticed that instead of showing the upcoming steps, there’s only a bar indicates the progress.

What’s the logic behind it? I always thought that indicating the exact number of steps is essential information for the user.

What do you think? In which cases showing steps is a must? Do you have any articles or researches on this topic?

Thanks <3

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dnd 5e – RAW, when using the Aburation Wizard’s Projected Ward, who takes “any remaining damage”?

The Abjuration Wizard’s 2nd level ability Arcane Ward reads:

Starting at 2nd level, you can weave magic around yourself for protection. When you cast an abjuration spell of 1st level or higher, you can simultaneously use a strand of the spell’s magic to create a magical ward on yourself that lasts until you finish a long rest.

In the context of this ability, the wizard is the “warded creature”, obviously.

The 6th level ability, Projected Ward, reads:

Starting at 6th level, when a creature that you can see within 30 feet of you takes damage, you can use your reaction to cause your Arcane Ward to absorb that damage. If this damage reduces the ward to 0 hit points, the warded creature takes any remaining damage.

To use Projected Ward, you must already have your Arcane Ward active, thus before using your reaction, you are definitely “the warded creature”. In the description for Projected Ward, it says you are using “your ward”, as in the ward that is warding you, to absorb the damage.

In the context of this ability who is the “warded creature”, the wizard or the creature who took the damage that triggered the reaction?

The RAI seems obvious here, but I would prefer a RAW focused ruling.