dnd 5e – If you summon an animal with conjure animals to fall on an opponent does it do damage


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dnd 5e – Summon Greater Demon: Can I summon a specific demon for which I know the true name?

You’ve answered your own question:

the spell description doesn’t say that it is possible to request a specific demon for which the true name is known

If it were possible, it would be specified in the spell. The spell, however, only specifies that:

You choose the demon’s type…

If you could summon a specific demon, this would be explained in the spell’s description. Since it isn’t listed as a possibility in the spell’s description, it’s outside of what the spell can do.

dnd 5e – Summon Greater Demon: Can I order the demon to tell me its true name?

It would appear so

It’s hard to know if it’s intended or not, but it is a consistent way to interpret the rules, depending on how you interpret p.54 of the Monster Manual, which tells us that:

A demon can be forced to disclose its name if charmed

There are two ways of reading this into your question:

  1. This specific rule overrides the general rules of Summon Greater Demon, and tells us that the only way to get a demon to disclose its true name is by charming it. The demon under your control via the casting of the spell is not technically charmed, so you’d need to charm it in order to learn its name
  2. This rule describes one possible way of learning a Demon’s name, but there are others. This makes sense because the paragraph in question also lists ‘ancient scrolls’ as a possible way of learning a Demon’s name. It’s consistent that threats, bargains or other means of control could also be used to illicit a demon’s name from the demon itself.

I’m sympathetic to the second ruling; I don’t see anything to suggest that the charmed condition is the only way to get a demon to tell you its name. Since the spell places no limit on what the controlled demon can be commanded to do (ie. commands are limited by what the demon can do), it follows that you can command the demon to tell you its name.

This seems counterintuitive and might be unintended – it would be unusual for the spell to specify that ‘the demon has disadvantage on this saving throw if you say its true name’ when the spell gives the means of learning its true name, albeit at the cost of an action at the start of the hour-long casting time.

I wouldn’t allow it at my table, but from what I can see it’s totally aligned with the RAW

Edit: I’ve been reading some other opinions on this, and I’m not 100% sure that it isn’t intended.

It’s also worth noting the absence of any rules which dissuade the caster from harming the demon, or causing it to cause harm to itself. Many creature-control spells allow the saving throw to be repeated or cause the spell to end if the caster or their allies harm the charmed creature, and explicitly forbid commands that will directly imperil the creature. This spell has no such caveats: You could literally summon a demon and command it to stab itself in the face with zero penalty. Considering that this is the extent of your control over the creature, it’s consistent to infer that you could ask the demon to tell you its name.

dnd 5e – Summon spells and AC

The summon spells introduced in Tasha’s Cauldron of Everything include an armor class calculation, but it’s unclear from the description if the AC should include the dexterity modifier or not.

For example the Undead Spirit from Summon Undead states the following:
Armor Class 11 + the level of the spell (natural armor)

But the creature has a Dexterity of 16 (+3).

So if I use Summon Undead as a 3rd level spell, is the creatures AC 14 or 17?

dnd 5e – Does Summon Undead “create” an undead?

A School of Necromancy Wizard at 6th level gains the Undead Thralls ability, which reads:

At 6th level, you add the animate dead spell to your spellbook if it is not there already. When you cast animate dead, you can target one additional corpse or pile of bones, creating another zombie or skeleton, as appropriate.

Whenever you create an undead using a necromancy spell, it has additional benefits:

  • The creature’s hit point maximum is increased by an amount equal to your wizard level.
  • The creature adds your proficiency bonus to its weapon damage rolls.

This is naturally most obviously relevant to Animate Dead itself, which starts with:

This spell creates an undead servant.

So Animate Dead is extremely explicit in triggering the ability. However, Summon Undead doesn’t have the word “create” anywhere in its description so it’s less clear.

Looking further, I found several other necromancy spells which result in new undead, and none of them have “create” or similar in their descriptions either, and I would assume the class feature would simply say Animate Dead if that’s the only spell that it works with, which would mean Summon Undead is probably fine too… But (at least on D&D Beyond) most of the other spells which make undead are tagged as “Creation” spells, which makes sense for them to be considered as “creating undead” for the class feature, whereas Summon Undead is tagged as Summoning instead, which also makes sense given the name. I’m pretty sure D&D Beyond tags aren’t actually rules, but I can see the logic that “Summoning” spells are taking a creature that already exists on another plane and moving it to the material plane, whereas “Creation” spells do something different and thus qualify as “creating” something.

So, personally I would rule that Summon Undead triggers Undead Thrall, but I can see other interpretations and I wonder whether there’s a more official way to determine the meaning of “create an undead”.

Can a Wildfire wild-shaped Druid command her Wildfire Spirit and her ‘Summon Bestial Spirit’ using a ‘Physic Whispers’ of a Soulknife Rogue?

So Physic Whipsers states:

[…] A creature can’t use this telepathy if it can’t speak any languages […]

A druid in wild shape retains her intelligence but

[…] your ability to speak […] is limited to the capabilities of your beast form

My question is

  1. Can she command her Spirits telepathically? A spirit understands the languages you speak, does it mean it can use Physic Whispers?
  2. Can she use Physic Whispers while in Beast form?

I guess I should decide it as a DM, since ‘no ability to speak’ does not mean ‘can’t speak languages’.

dnd 5e – Does a Firbolg lose their invisibility granted by the Hidden Step trait if a creature they summon attacks or deals damage?

The description of the firbolg trait Hidden Step states (VGtM, p. 107):

As a bonus action, you can magically turn invisible until the start of your next turn or until you attack, make a damage roll, or force someone to make a saving throw. Once you use this trait, you can’t use it again until you finish a short or long rest.

If you summon a creature and command it to attack and deal damage for you, does that count as you making an attack/damage roll, and therefore breaking your invisibility?

Or does the fact that your summon is its own creature mean that you didn’t make any rolls that would break your invisibility (though your summon did, while having no invisibility)?

dnd 5e – Does a Firbolg lose their invisibility granted by hidden step if their summon makes attacks or deals damage?

Hidden step states:

As a bonus action, you can magically turn invisible until the start of your next turn or until you attack, make a damage roll, or force someone to make a saving throw. Once you use this trait, you can’t use it again until you finish a short or long rest.

My question is that if you summon a creature and command it to attack and deal damage for you, does that count as you making an attack/damage roll and therefore breaking your invisibility? Or does the fact that your summon is it’s own creature mean that you didn’t make any rolls that would break your invisibility (your summon did)?

dnd 5e – Does a Firbolg lose their invisibility granted by hidden step if their summon attacks and deals damage?

Hidden step states: As a bonus action, you can magically turn invisible until the start of your next turn or until you attack, make a damage roll, or force someone to make a saving throw. Once you use this trait, you can’t use it again until you finish a short or long rest.

My question is that if you summon a creature and command it to attack and deal damage for you, does that count as you making an attack/damage roll and therefore breaking your invisibility? Or does the fact that your summon is it’s own creature mean that you didn’t make any rolls that would break your invisibility (your summon did)?

dungeons and dragons – How do Summon Monster spells work from lore perspective?

whether what is summoned is actually a creature from another plane or just copy of it, magical dummy that does what it was told to and vanishes?

It’s implied that it’s a real creature (or creatures, plural, depending on version):

This spell summons an extraplanar creature (typically an outsider, elemental, or magical beast native to another plane).

If it were a copy, it would say as such.


How are creatures to be summoned chosen? Can every creature in universe that has an outsider type be summoned? Can players playing tieflings and aasimars be summoned too?

They are randomly chosen from any available target. Such a target should be combat ready and ready to act.

It appears where you designate and acts immediately, on your turn.

This makes it clear that they won’t be eating, sleeping, procreating, etc.

Does a summoned creature have a say in whether it wants to be summoned in the first place? Can You just pull a creature out of it’s own plane at any moment in time? As funny as it sounds, majority of summoning situations would be either during eating, pooping, sleeping or having the fun-time. Not exactly pretty picture.

There’s no Spell Resistance, and no Saving Throw. They don’t have a choice. However, since the spell summons a monster that can act, it clearly won’t be doing anything else.

It also raises another concern. Whatever the creature was doing at the time of summoning is left unattended. This means summoning have a potential of mass destruction, simply by pulling out guards off their posts, builders off their work, sailors off their ships, etc.

Time flows differently between dimensions. It’s entirely possible that the entire time they spend on your plane is near-instantaneous on their own plane. It’s probably best to assume this from a DM perspective. They’re only going to be around for about 2 minutes with a maximum level summon, you can easily assume it was mere seconds or less on their own plane.

Does a summoned creature have a say in whether it wants to follow orders? Can You keep sending let’s say celestial creatures against their own kin? If that’s the case conquering other planes would be as simple as summoning half of it’s inhabitants to fight the other half.

The creature will attack to the best of its ability against those fighting against you. You can communicate, if possible, meaning that you might summon a creature you can’t even suggest actions for. They still have some semblance of control. And yes, they could attack their own kin.

However, think about the logistics of the second half. Can you summon half the population of a Standard Plane (average dimension about about 1 light year across)? No, you can only summon a small handful of creatures for a few minutes. You’d need to coordinate with every high level wizard and sorcerer on the planet to even have a chance, and even if you did, there’s little point in conquering a plane you can’t survive in.

Last but not least there’s a power level issue. From the perspective of simple combat situation Summon Monster seems like an average spell. Gives a temporary meatshield so caster can focus on casting instead of running from enemy. But when You look from the perspective of all I mentioned above, this is basically a planar travel combined with mind control, both of which are high-level endeavors. How can a low-level caster accomplish something like that?

It’s not a Mind Control and Planar Travel. Mind Control is absolute power, this is more like a Charm Monster spell, and it’s not a Planar Travel (a permanent one-way trip), it’s a temporary Planar Shift with a very short duration and specific conditions (death being a possibility).

So, while it’s low level, it’s actually pretty tame compared to what a high level caster can do. The spell is tuned to work in a way favorable for a short “meatshield” experience, but not a full-scale war on a plane, which would require you to summon potentially trillions of creatures to have a chance.