seo – Site Structure: Separating public pages from member pages

Context: I am designing a web application that’s geared toward members-only features. There’s no site features that would be useful to non-members, so most of the website will only be available to authenticated users. Thus, the only public pages will be things like an About Us page (with contact options), a Features/Comparisons page (promote the service relative to competitors), and of course a Home Page.

Problem: My initial thought was that the homepage index.php file, located at the website root, should load the public content for non-authenticated visitors, but should load the main application landing page for authenticated users. My main reason was for members’ ease-of-access — automatic serving of the content they’re actually trying to get to if they’re already logged in, and no need to type / remember / bookmark a more complicated address than mysite.com. But this got me thinking whether that would work best in the long run for issues like SEO and maintainability.

Approaches: I can think of three:

  1. All files are hosted under mysite.com, with no subdomains. When a visitor requests mysite.com/index.php, it checks for authentication, and serves up the correct HTML depending. (This is the approach I mentioned above.)
  2. Public files are hosted under www.mysite.com, while member-only pages are hosted under a subdomain like members.mysite.com. When an authenticated user attempts to access the public www.mysite.com/index.php, they’ll be automatically redirected to members.mysite.com/index.php.
  3. The same as option 2, but instead of being automatically redirected, the user will stay on the public homepage, and will need to navigate to their application landing page via the main nav. (This approach seems best if some of the public pages actually have usefulness to authenticated users, which they won’t on my site, so I’m thinking this option doesn’t make sense?)

Are there other options I’m not thinking of?

Questions:

  • How does each approach affect SEO, if at all?
  • Which of those approaches tends to be easiest to code for and maintain in the long run?

seo – Site Structure: Best practices for separating public pages from member pages

Context: I am designing a web application that’s geared toward members-only features. There’s no site features that would be useful to non-members, so most of the website will only be available to authenticated users. Thus, the only public pages will be things like an About Us page (with contact options), a Features/Comparisons page (promote the service relative to competitors), and of course a Home Page.

Problem: My initial thought was that the homepage index.php file, located at the website root, should load the public content for non-authenticated visitors, but should load the main application landing page for authenticated users. My main reason was for members’ ease-of-access — automatic serving of the content they’re actually trying to get to, and no need to type / remember / bookmark a more complicated address than mysite.com. But this got me thinking whether that would be best practice. I couldn’t find anything with a few Google searches, so….

Approaches: I can think of three:

  1. As mentioned above: All files are hosted under mysite.com, with no subdomains. When a visitor requests mysite.com/index.php, it checks for authentication, and serves up the correct HTML depending.
  2. Public files are hosted under www.mysite.com, while member-only pages are hosted under a subdomain like members.mysite.com. When an authenticated user attempts to access the public www.mysite.com/index.php, they’ll be automatically redirected to members.mysite.com/index.php.
  3. The same as option 2, but instead of being automatically redirected, the user will stay on the public homepage, and will need to navigate to their application landing page via the main nav. (This approach seems best if some of the public pages actually have usefulness to authenticated users, which they won’t on my site, so I’m thinking this option doesn’t make sense?)

Questions:

  • Are there other options I’m not thinking of?
  • Is there a clearly established best practice for this situation?
  • How does each approach affect SEO, if at all?
  • Which of those approaches tends to be easiest to code for and maintain in the long run?

Does URL structure really matter to users?

I have seen a bunch of answers regarding URL structure and SEO. However, I would like to know does URL structure really matter to users?

For example, if I have:
Parentsite.com/brand1
Parentsite.com/brand2

Vs

Brand1.com
Brand2.com

Do users really care if I point them to parentsite.com/brand1 vs brand1.com if the brands are all somewhat related?

By looking at larger sites like Google or Amazon, it doesn’t seem like URLs matter as long as you have a decent navigation and search capability. For example, a lot of google websites are just google.com/site_name. However, I have also seen a lot of articles that imply a structure like that isn’t standard if you have different brands.

Advice for a good sitemap structure

Who can me explain sitemaps? I am interested in the more complexed structure.

For example: on the homepage I have hyperlink to a page with categories A category can have a subcategory or a product.

The url structure look like this

What is a good structure for the sitemap?

I know the structure of a simple sitemap. But it are many urls…

Do I create an index sitemap with and split up everything like a sitemap for the homepage One sitemap for the categories and one for the products?

project structure – Function/class implementations in __init__.py of a Python module

Some packages have __init__.py files containing actual implementations of functions or classes. There are also very famous projects adopting this practice:

I was wondering what are the pros and cons of this practice and when it should be adopted.
I’ve searched online, but it seems that there is not a clear indication or a best practice. A lot of people suggest limiting the content of the __init__.py to essential things, using them only to structure your package.

I understand that this approach makes clearer interfaces of your module, especially if you have very small modules, with a very limited number of simple classes and functions. On the other hand, if you have a very large number of modules and all the implementations are in the __init__.py files, you will end having several files with the same name and probably you have to work on them at the same time; moreover, the size of the files can easily get out of hand and make them difficult to read and mantain.

Is there a best practice or at least a rule of thumb here? Is there any interesting reading or discussion on this topic?

java – Best data Structure for storing a phone keypad format

I am new to java collections and learning them right now. I was trying to code the phone keypad characters with its numbers. The first idea which came to my mind is using a HashMap. After trying various options I came up with the below Code. I want to know if the data structure and methodology which I implemented is good or does it need some more improvements.

Things which I know and don’t want to implement:

  1. I do not want to hardcode the keypad. I know that there are various ways of implementing a hardcoded keypad. I visited this and this link to learn about other ways.
  2. I would really be thankful if the solution is given in java 7 syntax. I don’t have much idea about java 8 syntax, but I’ll be helpful to know the solution in that too, if possible.
public static void keypadDemo(){
        // Creating a HashMap
        int ax = 97;
        Map<Integer, ArrayList<Character>> hm = new HashMap<>();
        for(int i = 0; i < 10; i++){
            if(i == 0 || i == 1){
                hm.put(i, null);
            }else if(i == 7 || i == 9){
                hm.put(i, new ArrayList<>(Arrays.asList((char) ax, (char) ++ax, (char) ++ax, (char) ++ax)));
                ax++;
            }else{
                hm.put(i, new ArrayList<>(Arrays.asList((char) ax, (char) ++ax, (char) ++ax)));
                ax++;
            }
        }
       System.out.println(hm);
    }

Any help will be welcomed. Thanks

windows 10 – Tool for data recovery from formated hdd which will keep original data structure

Is there any tool, which can recover data from formated HDD and it’s output will keep the original tree structure of previous folders ?

Last time I used such a software, I’ve ended up with bunch of messy files, some of them even without extensions..

I’ve just formated my hdd by acciently installing bootable win on it. After I found out the mistake, no other data was written on it.

Thank you for your help

automata – Determine if a Kripke structure satisfies an LTL formula

I am trying to understand the correlation between LTL and Kripke structures. Zoom classes are very tough to follow and i can’t find anything online. I have the following Kripke structure with q3 as start. I have to demonstrate that it either satisfies or not the following LTL formulae.

  1. a U b

  2. a U X(a ∧ ¬b)

  3. X¬b ∧ G(¬a ∨ ¬b)

Kripke structure

I would really appreciate if somebody could explain to me the steps to prove that a KS satisfies a LTL formula.

Software release folder structure – Software Engineering Stack Exchange

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stream processing – Clean structure for routing data through microservices using gRPC

Im working on a project where users can upload huge data files containing, for example, word embeddings. These embeddings then get projected to a lower dimension using conventional algorithms such as PCA, UMAP et cetera.

I figured it might be a good idea to try out the microservice architecture and gRPC for the communication.

Architecture

Since gRPC-web didn’t support bi-directional streaming yet I’m using websockets to communicate the chunks of the datafiles to a gateway, which translates it to gRPC, and forwards the data to the rest of the services.

First of all, I return the projection to the gateway, which translates it to a websocket message to send it back to the client. But I also want to perform a KNN on the projected data, so currently I send the projected data to the K-nearest Neighbour service aswell.

Rough data traffic

This works fine and all, but the rerouting part of the data gets very messy in the gateway program and a lot of error handling has to be done should a pod running a service fail. Is there anyway to do this easier? Perhaps using some sort of subscribe on data streams system?

Thanks in advance.