dnd 5e – What would be the effects of balance when adding additional Divination spells?

I'm playing a Divination wizard right now and I'm pretty disappointed that there are only 17 Divination spells, so I thought I'd look at some of the homemade ones to talk to the DM.

The question is, assuming that I create balanced spells, What are the effects on the power of the Divination subclass to increase the total number of Divination spells?

In particular, divination magicians have:

Expert divination

Starting at level 6, casting Divination spells is so easy for you that it only spends a fraction of your spell casting efforts. When you cast a second level Divination spell or higher using a spell slot, you recover a spent spell slot. The slot you recover must be one level lower than the spell you cast, and it can not be higher than level 5.

I know that, in general, this is not a thoughtful idea of ​​power, but I am concerned that, especially if I add combat spells, this can be quickly overcome.

A good response will be experienced in adding additional homemade Divination spells to the game, but a thoughtful answer that can explain the reasoning (or show some math) will be equally well received.

For a complete revelation, the part I am with has a War Wizard, a Wild Magical Warlock, a Cleric (I'm not sure of the subclass) and a Rogue. The spells I'm looking at would be combat related, probably one from each level of 4-8, with an additional non-combat spell of 6-8. None of the combat spells would cause damage, all would be defensive or offensive (see this spell as an example, assuming the damage was eliminated).

dnd 5e – What resurrection spells are valid for use with the & # 39; Warrior of the gods & # 39; of the Zealot?

I interpret the Warrior of the gods (hereinafter WoG) the description refers explicitly to the part of the resurrection of the spell, and not necessarily the fact that the spell does additional things. I interpret WoG in this way, since Raise Dead is used as an example. Raise Dead has additional effects, but we can reason that make Qualify for the cost exemption because it is included as an example. Therefore, these additional effects should not matter to WoG, so the only thing that remains is that should Matter is the resurrection itself.

Clone also does additional things (creating the body, in this case), but that is not what disqualifies him. The clone does not qualify for the cost exemption because it transfers the soul of the creature to a new body, instead of resuscitating it. This is supported by the answer to the question you linked in your comment.

This leaves us with 4 spells that we can focus on:
Revive, reincarnate, resurrection and true resurrection.

Note Bene:
There is also one more spell that is capable of returning a creature to life: Desire. If we were concerned about the material costs for Wish (which we are not), we would treat Wish in a similar way to how I describe True Resurrection below. Whether or not this spell would do qualifying for a cost exemption would depend solely on the content of the desire in question, and not on the description of the spell, according to my previous interpretation. However, this does not matter ultimately, since Wish does not require components of material to mold.

That said, let's examine the remaining 4 spells on our list:

Revitalize

The description of Revivify says:

You touch a creature that has died at the last minute. That creature comes back to life with 1 hit point. This spell can not bring back to life a creature that has died of old age, nor can it restore the missing parts of its body.

This is simple enough for us to reasonably reason that this spell qualifies for the exemption.

Reincarnate

This spell comes with attached strings (emphasis mine):

You play a dead humanoid or a piece of a dead humanoid. As long as the creature has died no more than 10 days, the spell forms a new adult body for him and then calls the soul to enter that body. If the soul of the target is not free or unwilling to do so, the spell fails.

Magic forms a new body for the creature to inhabit …

This spell is read similar to Clone, so we can consider that this spell does not qualify for the exemption. We are forming a new body here, as we did with Clone.

Resurrection

The spell of the Resurrection reads similarly to Raise Dead:

You touch a dead creature that has been dead for more than a century, who did not die in old age, and that is not an undead. If your soul is free and willing, the goal comes back to life with all its hit points.

This spell neutralizes any poison and heals the normal diseases that afflict the creature when it dies. However, it does not eliminate magical diseases, curses and the like; If such effects are not eliminated before casting the spell, they afflict the target upon returning to life.

This spell closes all mortal wounds and restores the missing parts of the body.

Returning from the dead is a test. The target has a -4 penalty on all attack rolls, saving shots and skill checks. Each time the target finishes a long rest, the penalty is reduced by 1 until it disappears …

If we can reason from WoG's description that Raise Dead works as written, we can also reason that Resurrection should qualify. The important difference between the spells is the effective time frame.

True resurrection

The true resurrection blurs the line between Clonar and Elevate Dead (the emphasis is mine):

You touch a creature that has been dead for more than 200 years and died for any reason, except old age. If the soul of the creature is free and willing, the creature comes back to life with all its hit points.

This spell closes all wounds, neutralizes any poison, heals all diseases and raises curses that affect the creature when it died. The spell replaces damaged or missing organs and limbs. If the creature was not dead, it is restored to its living undead form.

The spell You can even provide a new body if the original no longer exists, in which case you must pronounce the name of the creature. The creature then appears in an unoccupied space that you choose 10 feet from you.

By my aforementioned interpretation of WoG, this spell will qualify for the exemption only If it is not used to create a new body. If the spell is used to create a new body, we are now in Clone territory, and therefore we no longer qualify for the cost exemption.

conclusion

In summary, we can comfortably say that Raise Dead, Revivify, and Resurrection are qualified for the cost exemption offered by WoG. True resurrection may or could not Rate, depending on how the spell is used.

dnd 5e – What spells could a Bard identify from the Book of Shadows of the Covenant of the Warlock Tome?

Legally, the book is useless for the Bard. How does knowledge manifest itself depend on DM?

A shadow book only contains cantrips:

Your employer gives you a grimoire called Book of Shadows. When you win this feature, choose three songs from the spell list of any kind.

Since a class can only read spells of scrolls, etc. that are on your class list, this would mean that a Bard, at best, could only read the cantrips in the area that is already in the Bard spell list.

However, the bard could not make use of any Bard cantrips in the book because a Bard is limited in the number of cantrips they know (as are all kinds of spells).

On the other hand, a DM could treat the grimoire as a spell and allow the bard to cast while on his person. But this would mean that the Warlock could not throw those cantrips because the pact also says:

While the book is in your person, you can launch those cantrips at will.

(That is, without the book, those cantrips are not moldable). Once the Bardo returned the grimoire to the Warlock, the Bard would lose access to those cantrips. The net number of known cantrips in the match would remain constant in both directions.

How the DM decides to handle mechanics from a traditional point of view is his choice. The Bard can identify the type of magic for each cantrip (this is in accordance with the rules of the Detect Magic spell) but that has no real value. Maybe he / she can not read the writing of the book at all because the text appears as swirling shadows, without form, etc., so that only the nature of the magic is all that she can guess.

What level spells can a level 3 paladin throw?

So paladins do not have access to casting spells until level 2, can they cast level 1 and level 2 spells on their list? Or just level 1, since they could not throw anything at level 1.

dnd 5e – Can I cast reaction spells like Shield or Counterspell when I am in the middle of a spell with a long casting time and I do not stop casting it?

Yes, you can use your reaction to cast another spell as long as it does not require concentration.

When casting a spell with a casting time longer than one action, you must concentrate on the casting process and use your action in each round to continue casting the spell:

When you cast a spell with a casting time longer than an action or reaction, you must pass your action every turn to cast the spell and you must maintain your concentration while doing it. If your concentration is broken, the spell fails …

Then, your throw is interrupted if, for any reason, you do not use or you can not use your action on your turn to continue throwing, or your concentration is broken. Assuming you continue to use your action, you only have to worry about your concentration being broken, which can be caused by a handful of effects, but the most important thing is that:

  • Cast another spell that requires concentration. You lose concentration in a spell if you cast another spell that requires concentration. You can not focus on two spells at a time.

Notably, casting a different spell is not enough to break your concentration; It must be a spell that requires concentration by itself.

This means that you can cast other spells while casting a spell with a long casting time, as long as you do not have to use your action to do so, and they are not concentration spells.

dnd 5e – Can I cast reaction spells like Shield or Counterspell when I am in the middle of a spell with a long casting time and I do not stop casting it?

Yes, you can use your reaction to cast another spell as long as it does not require concentration.

When casting a spell with a casting time longer than one action, you must concentrate on the casting process and use your action in each round to continue casting the spell:

When you cast a spell with a casting time longer than an action or reaction, you must pass your action every turn to cast the spell and you must maintain your concentration while doing it. If your concentration is broken, the spell fails …

Then, your throw is interrupted if, for any reason, you do not use or you can not use your action on your turn to continue throwing, or your concentration is broken. Assuming you continue to use your action, you only have to worry about your concentration being broken, which can be caused by a handful of effects, but the most important thing is that:

  • Cast another spell that requires concentration. You lose concentration in a spell if you cast another spell that requires concentration. You can not focus on two spells at a time.

Notably, casting a different spell is not enough to break your concentration; It must be a spell that requires concentration by itself.

This means that you can cast other spells while casting a spell with a long casting time, as long as you do not have to use your action to do so, and they are not concentration spells.

dnd 5e – Can I use reaction spells like Shield or Counterspell when I'm casting long casting spells and I keep casting them?

Yes, you can use your reaction to cast another spell as long as it does not require concentration.

When casting a spell with a casting time longer than one action, you must concentrate on the casting process and use your action in each round to continue casting the spell:

When you cast a spell with a casting time longer than an action or reaction, you must pass your action every turn to cast the spell and you must maintain your concentration while doing it. If your concentration is broken, the spell fails …

Then, your throw is interrupted if, for any reason, you do not use or you can not use your action on your turn to continue throwing, or your concentration is broken. Assuming you continue to use your action, you only have to worry about your concentration being broken, which can be caused by a handful of effects, but the most important thing is that:

  • Cast another spell that requires concentration. You lose concentration in a spell if you cast another spell that requires concentration. You can not focus on two spells at a time.

Notably, casting a different spell is not enough to break your concentration; It must be a spell that requires concentration by itself.

This means that you can cast other spells while casting a spell with a long casting time, as long as you do not have to use your action to do so, and they are not concentration spells. You can cast other spells using your reaction or even using additional action on your turn without interrupting the casting of the longest spell.

dnd 5e – Can I use reaction spells as a shield / counterspell when I'm casting long casting spells and I keep casting them?

Can I use reaction spells as a shield / counterspell when I am embedding a long cast time spell spell and I do not stop casting it?
Compendium of salvia advice:

Can you cast a reaction spell on your turn? Surely you can! This is a common way of it happening: Cornelius, the magician is throwing ball of fire on his turn, and his enemy throws. countersink at. Cornelius also has countersink prepared, so use your reaction to launch it and break the ability of your enemy. countersink before I can stop ball of fire.

and the counterspell only has S components. What about the launch shield that needs V and S you have to cast a long cast spell that needs a V component?

dnd 3.5e – Do family members provoke opportunity attacks when delivering tactile spells?

Now looking online I found this:

If the teacher is level 3 or higher, a relative can provide tactile spells. If the teacher and relative are in contact at the time the teacher cast a touch spell, you can designate your relative as the "toucher". The relative can then deliver the tactile spell just as the master could. As usual, if the master cast another spell before the touch is delivered, the touch spell dissipates.

Can someone tell me something that explains whether or not they provoke AOO in a rulebook?

dnd 5e – Is it realistic to create a character that does not use a weapon and only spells?

Is it realistic to create a character that does not use a weapon and only spells? Is there a way to create a character that only struggles with magic? To be frank, I do not know what a magician I could not Do that.

Obviously, I would use the magician, sorcerer or clergyman classes for that. When I'm going to create a character, there do not seem to be classes that only fight with magic.