dnd 5e – Sword of Wounding and Sneak Damage

While not explicitly spelled out, it’s generally accepted that Sneak Attack Damage is part of your Weapon Damage, the same way your Stat bonus to damage is part of your weapon damage.

It is treated as being the same Type of damage as the weapon you are using deals, and it benefits from all of the other things that impact damage.

Based on that, yes…a Sneak Attack done with a Sword of Wounding (assuming said sword was a Finesse weapon) would apply the Sword of Wounding’s effects to the entire damage stack.

This is further supported by developer commentary. This is from Mike Mearls, so it is not authoritative, as if it came from the Sage Advice Compendium, but it does still represent designer intent.

Q: If sneak attack is used, are sneak damage dice part of the weapon damage dice? are sneak dice maximzd with sharpness sword?

A: i’d say yes

Source

dnd 5e – If I have Extra Attacks, when can I decide which one is a sneak attack?

You can choose which hit to apply the sneak attack damage to

The Sneak Attack feature states (among other things):

Once per turn, you can deal an extra 1d6 damage to one creature you hit with an attack if you have advantage on the attack roll. The attack must use a finesse or a ranged weapon.

Notice that the feature does not specify the first attack, only “an attack.” Because of that, you can elect to apply your sneak attack damage on any of your attacks as long as you meet the other criteria of sneak attack (weapon type, advantage or adjacent enemy of the target, etc.) and you haven’t already performed a sneak attack that turn.

###You have to declare the sneak attack before you roll damage

Jeremy Crawford, 5e lead rules designer, gave his unofficial ruling on Twitter, saying:

You decide whether to use Sneak Attack when a qualifying attack hits.

(source)

If you have rolled damage, but elected not to apply Sneak Attack damage, the trigger for that choice – a qualifying attack hitting – has already passed. Thus, if you want to apply your extra damage, you have to do it after you hit and before you roll your weapon damage.

dnd 5e – Can a rogue use Sneak Attack when an ally has been swallowed by the target?

RAW, you would get Sneak Attack, but I would agree with your DM in my ruling.

You have outlined the proper rules as written argument. The Behir’s swallowing causes the ally to be Blinded and Restrained, neither of which interact with Sneak Attack:

You don’t need advantage on the attack roll if another enemy of the target is within 5 feet of it, that enemy isn’t incapacitated, and you don’t have disadvantage on the attack roll.

That said, the feature description of Sneak Attack also says:

you know how to strike subtly and exploit a foe’s distraction.

The idea here is that when you have an ally engaged within 5 feet of the target, that ally is sufficiently distracting your target so that you can get off a good shot. I have always ruled that a swallowed creature is no longer providing this level of distraction and so does not qualify your attack for sneak attack. This explanation has always been received well by my players the few times this has happened.

So this one could go either way. It is also reasonable to rule that Sneak Attack does apply, since the swallowed creature can still damage the Behir, which may be sufficiently distracting. Just be careful, ambitious players may try to justify sneak attack damage on any target with sufficiently painful gastrointestinal conditions.

dnd 5e – Sneak attack when an ally has been swallowed?

RAW, you would get sneak attack, but I would agree with your DM in my ruling.

You have outlined the proper rules as written argument. The Behir’s swallowing causes Blinded and Restrained, neither of which interact with Sneak Attack:

You don’t need advantage on the attack roll if another enemy of the target is within 5 feet of it, that enemy isn’t incapacitated, and you don’t have disadvantage on the attack roll.

That said, the feature description of Sneak Attack also says:

you know how to strike subtly and exploit a foe’s distraction.

The idea here is that when you have an ally engaged within 5 feet of the target, that ally is sufficiently distracting your target so that you can get off a good shot. I have always ruled that a swallowed creature is no longer providing this level of distraction and so does not qualify your attack for sneak attack. This explanation has always been received well by my players the few times this has happened.

dnd 5e – Can a Swashbuckler Rogue use sneak attack on an isolated target at OVER five feet(Ranged)?

The Swashbuckler’s Rakish Audacity method of using Sneak Attack requires that you be adjacent to your target

The feature states (emphasis mine):

(…) you don’t need advantage on the attack roll to use your Sneak Attack against a creature if you are within 5 feet of it, no other creatures are within 5 feet of you, and you don’t have disadvantage on the attack roll. All the other rules for Sneak Attack still apply to you.

This means that all three of those conditions must be met to use this new method of Sneak Attack, while also following all the regular Sneak Attack rules. One of those three conditions is that you must be within 5 feet of your target.


An overly long sidenote on a different printing

Note that the Sword Coast Adventurer’s Guide (SCAG) has the feature worded as follows:

(…) you don’t need advantage on your attack roll to use your Sneak Attack if no creature other than your target is within 5 feet of you. All the other rules for the Sneak Attack class feature still apply to you.

This might have ramifications for whether this works at a range since the Xanathar’s version (the one quoted first) clearly answers this while the SCAG version has some ambiguity. Does “no creature other than your target is within 5 feet of you” imply that your target actually is within 5 feet of you?

I would say that it does, the same way I would say “Nobody other than Bob came to session” implies (if not just means) that Bob did come to session. Thus “no creature other than X is Y” allows us to conclude that X must also be Y and then that your target must also actually be within 5 feet of you and thus the Sneak Attack cannot be done at range even with the SCAG wording of the feature.

monsters – Can a standard Kobold Warrior make a Sneak Attack with a spear?

The standard Kobold Warrior has the Sneak Attack ability, which specifies:

The kobold warrior deals an extra 1d4 precision damage to flat-footed creatures.

But the general description of the Sneak Attack ability in the glossary says:

When the monster Strikes a creature that has the flat-footed condition with an agile or finesse melee weapon, an agile or finesse unarmed attack, or a ranged weapon attack, it also deals the listed precision damage. For a ranged attack with a thrown weapon, that weapon must also be an agile or finesse weapon.

The preface to Creature Abilities also says:

The statistics for individual creatures might alter the traits, the number of actions, or other rules of these abilities. Anything noted in a specific creature’s stat block overrides the general rules for the ability below.

The only weapons the kobold warrior has are a spear and a sling. Does this mean that he can only use it’s sneak attack with the sling (since the spear is neither agile nor finesse)? Or is its own description of the Sneak Attack ability overriding the general one, and removing all the prerequisites?

dnd 5e – Rogue using Dual Wield and Sneak Attack

Yes or No, depending on how you meant the question.

Sneak attack is a once per turn feature, so you may not use it on both attacks. However, since sneak attack affects one creature you hit with an attack if you have advantage on the attack roll, while using a finesse or a ranged weapon, dual wielding is a decent option, as you have two chances to hit and apply that extra sneak attack damage.

Note: You don’t need advantage on the attack roll if another enemy of the target is within 5 feet of it, that enemy isn’t incapacitated, and you don’t have disadvantage on the attack roll.

dnd 5e – Can I choose which damage type my Sneak Attack does if my weapon does multiple types?

Contrary to the answer in the linked question, allow me to propose that Sneak Attack doesn’t have a damage type because there is no type specifically mentioned in the text.

Not all damage needs to be typed

See this answer on the damage type caused by blood loss, as well as some in-universe examples of untyped damage: the Stirge’s Blood drain, the Bearded Devil’s Glaive, and the Horned Devil’s Tail. Some types of damage in D&D is untyped and does not fit with the default types.

Sneak Attack only says you deal extra damage, without a type mentioned

The text for Sneak Attack says only this:

Beginning at 1st level, you know how to strike subtly and exploit a foe’s distraction. Once per turn, you can deal an extra 1d6 damage to one creature you hit with an attack if you have advantage on the attack roll. The attack must use a finesse or a ranged weapon.

You can reason out that, just as the blood loss over time does not have a well-defined type of damage, you can argue that the extra SA damage comes from the exploitation of the target’s distractions and weak spots — which is itself not a kind of well-defined damage.

This tweet claims that all damage has a type, given by Jeremy Crawford himself. This clearly shows the intent behind damage types. However, his tweet is directly contradicted by the Monster Manual, a core rulebook, by showing instances of damage that do not have a damage type.

Note that these instances are not mistakes because they are not in the errata. We are left with the designer stating design intentions that is contradicted by a core rulebook. The core rulebook is more authoritative than a tweet — that’s why it’s a core rulebook.

Without JC’s statement about all damage having a type, the viewpoint that some damage does not have a type is stronger.

You don’t get to choose the damage type of Sneak Attack as it is an untyped damage on top of your normal weapon damage dice.

class feature – How does Shadow Sneak Attack Progress? Will it work with Strategic Strike?

First, Shadow Sneak Attack doesn’t progress. It’s 1d6 forever.

You gain the sneak attack class feature, except you deal 1d6 precision
damage regardless of your level. Sneak attack from multiple sources
isn’t cumulative. If you have sneak attack from more than one source,
use only the highest number of dice when you sneak attack rather than
adding the amounts together.

However, fortuitously for you, it does stack with your Strategic Strike. Precision damage stacks with itself by default, and where there are exceptions, they’re called out specifically (as above).

dnd 5e – How to Sneak Attack with a Familiar with Aid Another action when master and Familiar go at different Initiative order?

Find familiar states:

A familiar can’t attack, but it can take other actions as normal.

One such action is the Help action:

Alternatively, you can aid a friendly creature in attacking a creature within 5 feet of you. You feint, distract the target, or in some other way team up to make your ally’s attack more effective. If your ally attacks the target before your next turn, the first attack roll is made with advantage.

Your familiar would take the Help action on its turn, and you would then have advantage on your first attack on your next turn.

This may be a case of edition baggage, D&D 3.5e had an action called Aid Another that worked similarly to 5e’s Help action.