Sitemap best practices for multilingual websites: should I list my URLs in each language or is it enough to use rel = "alternate" + hreflang?

I am working on the site maps of a multilingual website and I have doubts about the best practices to refer to each language version of a page.

For a little background, the website refers to around 20,000 places with community comments and descriptions. The website is available in 5 languages ​​(website.com/fr; website.com/it …)

At the moment, my site map only refers to pages in English and on the site map for each page that I specify for each language (as well as English) as recommended by Google.

In Google Search Console, I see that approximately 75% of pages with valid coverage are described as "indexed, not submitted on Sitemap", which makes me think that the alternative link with the hreflang attribute is not enough to "send" the Google page to index it.

Should I list the pages in the 5 languages ​​on my site map and use them too? in each link?

Google adds new options to rel = NOFOLLOW Attribute

When nofollow was introduced, Google would not count any links marked in this way as a signal to use within our search algorithms. This has now changed. All link attributes [sponsored, UGC and nofollow] are treated as clues about which links to consider or exclude within the Search.

cache – rel = "dns-prefetch" / rel = "preconnect" vs expiration headers in the distant future …?

I have always been a big fan of the expiration headings of distant futures. The first visit on the home page of my site results in 40 HTTP requests, but a subsequent visit comes to 1, with a response as agile as you would expect. This is great, very happy.

However, I just learned about dns-prefetch and preconnect. I can see that they would help (marginally) with a load for the first time, but I suppose that the additional overhead is a bad thing in subsequent uploads, since I would be starting some DNS searches / SSL link protocols for domains that I don't & # 39; I don't even get used to it.

What is the best practice, or how have you approached this?

html – Rel = Nofollow does not appear in "inspect element" but in "page source"

I am working on WordPress and I have difficulty creating an image with an outgoing nofollow URL. I made it work in "Pages" but I cannot give the same result in "Publications".

More specifically, when I am the inspection element, the "rel = nofollow" seems to be completely missing, while it appears in "Page source".

Here is an example with an image. There seems to be no follow-up in the inspection items section, but it appears in the source of the page

Nofollow seems to be missing in the inspection items section, but it appears in the source of the page

I followed the same steps in another part of my page, and everything worked fine.

Here is an example of a nofollow that works correctly.

enter the description of the image here

As you can see, I made it work on the pages but I can't do the same for the posts. In the posts, I inherited a strange "fusion-no-lightbox" class, from which I have no idea where this comes from.

A couple of questions:

  • How do I get rid of this strange "fusion-no-lightbox" class of my element?
  • How do I insert rel = nofollow in the image in the post?
  • Does Google read the source code of the entire page?
  • Will Google detect that the image must be nofollow?

htaccess – canonical rel for http and https

Simply configure the canon to the HTTPS version (preferred). Both HTTP and HTTPS will remain available. Anyway, Google will probably favor the HTTPS version over HTTP, regardless of the protocol it establishes in rel = "canonical" label (because presumably you will know that both HTTPS and HTTP are available).

Setting the canonical conditional condition based on the protocol makes no sense: Are HTTP and HTTPS probably serving the same content? You can not have two different "canonical URLs" for the same content.

seo – Google Custom Search shows redirect URLs to external links despite rel = "nofollow noopener" on those links

I have a website that contains a list of all the companies in my region. Everyone has a profile page that can include a Facebook or website URL.

I added rel = "nofollow noopener" to all external links, but it seems that this does not work and Google still indexes the redirector. When I search for this on Google: site: www.mijngistel.be I still see Facebook links, etc.

I did not configure this at the beginning of the website, but I made this change a couple of months ago.

It's wrong?

html – rel = "noreferrer noopener" in target = "_ blank" external links

In many places I've been reading, they say you should use rel = "noreferrer noopener" when you use target = "_ blank" inside external links.

I can understand why you should use Noopener as a precaution against reverse tabs and also for performance benefits. I also understand using noreferrer for older browsers, such as Firefox versions 51 and earlier, because they are not compatible Noopener, but as suggested in GitHub:

Trying to serve older browsers is useless because there are numerous other security attacks to which those browsers are susceptible. If the user wishes to be sure, he must use the most recent browser.
– Comment by mojavelinux (May 1, 2017)

Using noreferrer It also affects Google Analytics data.

What is the current position regarding the use of noreferrer inside target = "_ blank" external links?

html – rel = "noreferrer noopener" in the links of target = "_ blank"

In many places I've been reading, they say you should use rel = "noreferrer noopener" when you use target = "_ blank" within the links.

I can understand why you should use Noopener as a precaution against reverse tabs and also for performance benefits. I also understand using noreferrer for older browsers, such as Firefox versions 51 and earlier, because they are not compatible Noopener, but as suggested in GitHub:

Trying to serve older browsers is useless because there are numerous other security attacks to which those browsers are susceptible. If the user wishes to be sure, he must use the most recent browser.
– Comment by mojavelinux (May 1, 2017)

Using noreferrer It also affects Google Analytics data.

What is the current position regarding the use of noreferrer inside target = "_ blank" golf course?

schema.org – Combination of the author scheme of RDFa Lite and rel = "author" marked HTML

Is there any way to preserve HTML? rel part of the following code fragment:


   
Contact

without receiving this warning:

AboutPage 0 ERRORS 1 WARNINGS
@type AboutPage
Author
@type person
name my name
! The author of the property is not recognized by Google for an object of type Person.
@type type not specified

Just a rel:


   
Contact

gives

AboutPage 0 ERRORS 0 WARNINGS
@type AboutPage
Author
@type type not specified

It seems that I can not give the rel a kind without property = "author" which then causes weird Author Duplicates of various types.

I am aware that I could remove the rel entirely or move it to goal data, but if the structured data test tool insists on recognizing the rel = "author" then there must be a way to give it a kind, do not?

seo – Will the product pages help create context for their respective main categories, even though `rel = canonical & # 39; points elsewhere?

Let's say that I have 2 main product categories as follows:

  • Decor: You can see all the products related to decoration here. From a navigation perspective, this will allow visitors to navigate through Products.
  • Kitchen: You can see all the products related to cooking here. From a navigation perspective, this will allow visitors to navigate through the room.

So let's say the site has a food themed clock. As such, this product could be placed within & # 39; Decoration & # 39; and & # 39; Kitchen & # 39; As such, produce the following URL structures:

  • www.example.com/decor/product-name/
  • www.example.com/kitchen/product-name/

Canonical URL:

Obviously, the issue of duplicate content should be addressed first. To deal with this, the product page, would contain the following entry:

rel = "canonical" href = "http://www.example.com/product/product-name/"

I am aware that canonization is a way of "telling" search engines the preferred version of a URL and, therefore, where to distribute your PageRank, etc.

Question:

With the product page, which now appears within both product categories, will any context pass to their respective product categories? Given that the aforementioned product page is optimized for the keywords related to "decoration" and "kitchen", would it inform the search engines and, as such, would it contribute to the context of both product categories?