legal – Do I break the law as a foreigner in Germany if an embassy keeps my passport to stick a visa in?

An Armenian national lives in Germany and holds a permanent residence (Niederlassungserlaubnis). This is a sticker in their Armenian passport. They have applied at the UK embassy in Berlin to get a standard visitor visa, which will likely be granted. The UK embassy kept their passport and said issuing and sticking the visa into the passport will take five days. After those five days, they will be able to reclaim their passport.

However, German residence act (Aufenthaltsgesetz) § 3 says that as a foreigner you have to have a passport with you (English source, German source).

(1) Foreigners may only enter or stay in the federal territory if they are in possession of a recognised and valid passport or passport substitute, unless they are exempt from the passport obligation by virtue of a statutory instrument. For the purpose of residence in the federal territory, possession of a substitute identity document shall also suffice in order to meet the passport obligation (Section 48 (2)).

Section 48 says they have to give that document to the German authorities if they need it, i.e. for a control.

Also when asked, the Berlin foreigners office (Auslaenderbehoerde) says as the holder of a residence permit you should carry your passport around at all times.

So within those five days, they have a passport and a valid visa for Germany, but they cannot carry it around with them as it’s with the UK embassy.

How do they fulfill the obligation to have their passport with them all the time? Are they breaking the law?

usa – Can I (a US citizen) travel from Puerto Rico to Miami with just a copy of my passport?

No, but also yes.

A photocopy of a passport is not a valid ID, according to the TSA. But, also, it is sometimes possible to fly without an ID if you have lost yours. In such cases, be prepared to undergo extra security screening and identify verification, and be sure to get to the airport extra-early (the TSA advises arriving 2 hours before your flight).

usa – Can US citizen travel from Puerto Rico to Miami with just a copy of my passport?

No, but also yes.

A photocopy of a passport is not a valid ID, according to the TSA. But, also, it is sometimes possible to fly without an ID if have lost yours. In such cases, be prepared to undergo extra security screening and identify verification, and be sure to get to the airport extra-early (the TSA advises arriving 2 hours before your flight).

usa – Can everyone with my passport data see my American arrival/departure record (form I-94)?

When you go to the I-94 website, you have to agree to a warning:

By accessing this website, you understand and acknowledge that:

You are declaring under penalty of perjury pursuant to 28 U.S. Code §
1746 that you: (1) are only seeking records about yourself, (2) are
seeking records about someone for whom you are the legal guardian, or
(3) you have the consent of the person whose records you are seeking.
You are not authorized to access this website to retrieve records of
another person unless you are the person’s legal guardian or you have
the person’s consent.

Unauthorized or improper use or access of this website, including the unauthorized or improper modification, destruction, or disclosure
of any information or data contained herein, is expressly prohibited,
and may result in civil and criminal penalties.

The access and use of this website is subject to monitoring by DHS for administrative, law enforcement, or criminal investigative
purposes, inquiries into alleged wrongdoing or misuse, and to ensure
proper performance of applicable security features and procedures. DHS
may monitor the access or use of this website without further notice.
You may not process classified national security information on this
website.

So at least on paper, it violates US law for someone else to look up your information unless they have your consent. But practically, there’s not a deeply strong mechanism to enforce that, and people or entities outside of the US might not care that they’re breaking US law. I wouldn’t be surprised if there was some monitoring in place to detect bulk queries, brute force attacks, and abuse of the system, but it seems unlikely a rogue employer or someone else performing a single lookup would be caught and face consequences for that even if it is illegal.

If you click through to the privacy notice for the website, it does say that “CBP will retain the information submitted when attempting to access records through this website for 3 months for audit and system performance purposes,” so there’s at least a theoretical possibility they could identify some types of misuse from those logs. If you think your records have been misused, you could conceivably try requesting a copy of those logs that pertain to you; I have no idea if they’ll actually give them to you (or refuse because you’re not a citizen/permanent resident, or perhaps misunderstand your request and just send you your I-94) or do so in a timely fashion or whether they’d be of any use.

So yes, anyone with the required information from your passport can see your travel history (or at least the potentially incomplete version displayed by the website).

air travel – Can I still fly to Pakistan if my passport number on my Pakistan Origin Card does not match my current passport number?

I think you can (but would be worth checking!) since there is no qualification of:

  • Seven years card validity (except foreign spouse)

at High Commission for Pakistan London. (The foreign spouse exclusion merely is to limit the validity to five years.)

Timatic is not very helpful with:

Visa required, except for Passengers with a Pakistan origin
card (POC) or a national ID card for overseas Pakistanis

since there is no mention of the numbers having to match (though lack of that is a good sign, in a way).

usa – Can everyone with my passport data see my American I94?

When you go to the I-94 website, you have to agree to a warning:

By accessing this website, you understand and acknowledge that:

You are declaring under penalty of perjury pursuant to 28 U.S. Code §
1746 that you: (1) are only seeking records about yourself, (2) are
seeking records about someone for whom you are the legal guardian, or
(3) you have the consent of the person whose records you are seeking.
You are not authorized to access this website to retrieve records of
another person unless you are the person’s legal guardian or you have
the person’s consent.

Unauthorized or improper use or access of this website, including the unauthorized or improper modification, destruction, or disclosure
of any information or data contained herein, is expressly prohibited,
and may result in civil and criminal penalties.

The access and use of this website is subject to monitoring by DHS for administrative, law enforcement, or criminal investigative
purposes, inquiries into alleged wrongdoing or misuse, and to ensure
proper performance of applicable security features and procedures. DHS
may monitor the access or use of this website without further notice.
You may not process classified national security information on this
website.

So at least on paper, it violates US law for someone else to look up your information unless they have your consent. But practically, there’s not a deeply strong mechanism to enforce that, and people or entities outside of the US might not care that they’re breaking US law. I wouldn’t be surprised if there was some monitoring in place to detect bulk queries, brute force attacks, and abuse of the system, but it seems unlikely a rogue employer or someone else performing a single lookup would be caught and face consequences for that even if it is illegal.

If you click through to the privacy notice for the website, it does say that “CBP will retain the information submitted when attempting to access records through this website for 3 months for audit and system performance purposes,” so there’s at least a theoretical possibility they could identify some types of misuse from those logs. If you think your records have been misused, you could conceivably try requesting a copy of those logs that pertain to you; I have no idea if they’ll actually give them to you (or refuse because you’re not a citizen/permanent resident, or perhaps misunderstand your request and just send you your I-94) or do so in a timely fashion or whether they’d be of any use.

So yes, anyone with the required information from your passport can see your travel history (or at least the potentially incomplete version displayed by the website).

visas – How many days it takes to receive a passport by an express courier return?

I have applied for a UK visa in Paris and I am wondering whether I should choose the express courier return service or not. I have already been troubled a lot by Covid-19 and I want to receive the passport as soon as possible after the decision has been made. However, I am afraid the TLSContact courier service will take too long, or perhaps it may not be something to trust very well. For those who know, how many days it usually takes for such a service to deliver a passport?

Can a late passport renewal affect getting visas?

If I understand your question correctly, and you wonder about any impact on future visa applications (i.e. after you have your new passport, say in April 2021 in your example), I doubt this would have any effect.

Countries you haven’t yet visited/applied a visa for generally won’t even know about it.

And even if they have the information, I don’t see how this would matter for any country.

Renewing Passport after expired

I am from Pakistan. I want to ask if we renew our Passport after some month of expired then, is that can effect on getting Visas when apply.

For Example. Passport expires in AUG,2020 , Then renew it in MARCH 2021

Thanks,
Sheikh

Inserted the space between first and last name in my passport

I have inserted the space in my passport name (Name in Old Passport & US VISA: RASHEEDKHAN and Name in new passport: RASHEED KHAN), Do I need to apply new VISA or can I continue with the old one. Please advise.