pathfinder 1e – Can spells that stabilize you when you would die protect you from death by massive damage?

No, these spells cannot save you from death by massive damage.

From the PFSRD (emphasis mine):

Massive Damage (Optional Rule):
If you ever sustain a single attack that deals an amount of damage equal to half your total hit points (minimum 50 points of damage) or more and it doesn’t kill you outright, you must make a DC 15 Fortitude save. If this saving throw fails, you die regardless of your current hit points.

Note in particular the part about killing you regardless of your current hit points. You could be reactively healed to full by these effects and it wouldn’t save you, because they’re simply preventing the damage from killing you outright. You’re not dying due to your hit points being too low, you’re dying because you failed a saving throw against an instant death effect: you don’t fall unconscious, drop to zero HP, or pass go & collect $200, you just die.

Here’s the sequence of events: Bob, a fighter with a maximum of 125 hit points, currently has 70 hit points and is under the effects of Nine Lives. Bob is struck by a storm giant for 90 damage, reducing him to -20, which would normally kill him. Nine Lives heals Bob for 3d6 (let’s say 12), bringing him to a safe-ish -8 hit points. But this doesn’t save Bob from the massive damage rule! Bob took damage that was both >= 50hp and at least half his max hit points in a single blow, so the massive damage rule triggers. The massive damage rule does not check Bob’s current hit point, it just directly forces Bob to make a fortitude saving throw. Alas, Bob rolls a 2, and fails his save. Thus, per the massive damage rule, Bob dies no matter how many hit points he has.

Consider a second example: Bob is instead at full hit points (125), and is struck by a storm giant for 90. Bob is not reduced to zero by this damage, only 35, and so Nine Lives and similar effects do not trigger. But the massive damage rule doesn’t care how many hit points Bob has left; its trigger is the amount of damage that Bob took. Bob still has to make a fortitude saving throw, and he will still die if he fails it, despite having 35 hit points left.

The only things that will save you from death by massive damage are effects that prevent you from taking the damage in the first place or reduce it below the trigger threshold, or succeeding on your fortitude saving throw (never listen to anyone who tells you Constitution can be a dump stat).

pathfinder 1e – Can spells that stabilise you when you’d die overrule death from massive damage?

No, these spells cannot save you from death by massive damage.

From the PFSRD (emphasis mine):

Massive Damage (Optional Rule):
If you ever sustain a single attack that deals an amount of damage equal to half your total hit points (minimum 50 points of damage) or more and it doesn’t kill you outright, you must make a DC 15 Fortitude save. If this saving throw fails, you die regardless of your current hit points.

Note in particular the part about killing you regardless of your current hit points. You could be reactively healed to full by these effects and it wouldn’t save you, because they’re simply preventing the damage from killing you outright. You’re not dying due to your hit points being too low, you’re dying because you failed a saving throw against an instant death effect: you don’t fall unconscious, drop to zero HP, or pass go & collect $200, you just die.

Here’s the sequence of events: Bob, a fighter with a maximum of 125 hit points, currently has 70 hit points and is under the effects of Nine Lives. Bob is struck by a storm giant for 90 damage, reducing him to -20, which would normally kill him. Nine Lives heals Bob for 3d6 (let’s say 12), bringing him to a safe-ish -8 hit points. But this doesn’t save Bob from the massive damage rule! Bob took damage that was both >= 50hp and at least half his max hit points in a single blow, so the massive damage rule triggers. The massive damage rule does not check Bob’s current hit point, it just directly forces Bob to make a fortitude saving throw. Alas, Bob rolls a 2, and fails his save. Thus, per the massive damage rule, Bob dies no matter how many hit points he has.

Consider a second example: Bob is instead at full hit points (125), and is struck by a storm giant for 90. Bob is not reduced to zero by this damage, only 35, and so Nine Lives and similar effects do not trigger. But the massive damage rule doesn’t care how many hit points Bob has left; its trigger is the amount of damage that Bob took. Bob still has to make a fortitude saving throw, and he will still die if he fails it, despite having 35 hit points left.

The only things that will save you from death by massive damage are effects that prevent you from taking the damage in the first place or reduce it below the trigger threshold, or succeeding on your fortitude saving throw (never listen to anyone who tells you Constitution can be a dump stat).

HostItBro’s Massive 20TB Bandwidth Offer ($5/mo for 2GB in Germany)

 

 

 

Host It Bro is a fist-bump name with an interesting 2GB @ $5/month offer.  I kind of wish they’d played up the pun in their name a little more (Host IT Bro…get it?) but nonetheless, they’re new to LEB and have stepped up with generous resources.

These offers are pleasantly intriguing: 2GB RAM on both, 1 or 2 vCPU, 20GB or 40GB and…whoa!  20TB of bandwidth.  That’s a lot of bytes.

I think they’re still coming together as a company, given some of the placeholder/stock images on their web site…and their host nodes are i9s with 2x1TB hard drives, so I’m thinking this isn’t big iron they’re running on.  On the other hand, for $5 paid monthly you’re not risking much for a pretty insanely huge bandwidth offer.  I pulled their 100MB test file at about 10.6 MB/sec at home and 11.7MB/sec in a datacenter.

Host It Bro is a brand of Arshpreet Web Technology and they’re a registered business in India (registration #03GETPS5748G1ZT).  You can find their TOS/Legal Docs on their website.  You can pay with credit cards, Netbanking, Paytm, Freecharge, Jio Money, Mobikwik, UPI and Bank transfer.

If you decide to give them a spin, the LEB community would love to hear about your experience in the comments section below!

Here’s what they had to say: 

“We are managing our servers by ourselves, not reselling.  Users will get the best possible website speed with the cheapest price.”

Here’s the offer: 

2GB RAM
Germany

  • 2GB RAM

  • 1x vCPU
  • 20GB HDD space

  • 20TB transfer

  • 1Gbps uplink

  • 1x IPv4

  • /64 IPv6

  • OpenVZ

  • $50/month
  • $60/year

  • (ORDER)

2GB RAM
Germany

  • 2GB RAM

  • 2x vCPU
  • 40GB HDD space

  • 20TB transfer

  • 1Gbps uplink

  • 1x IPv4

  • /64 IPv6

  • OpenVZ

  • $10/month
  • $120/year

  • (ORDER)

NETWORK INFO:

Datacenter Name – Hetzner (91710 Gunzenhausen, Deutschland)
Test IPv4: 95.217.77.38
Test IPv6: ::2a01:4f9:4a:1c99:: / 64
Test file: https://speedtest.hostitbro.com/100MB.bin
Looking glass: https://speedtest.hostitbro.com/

Host Node Specifications:

Please let us know if you have any questions/comments and enjoy!

raindog308

I’m Andrew, techno polymath and long-time LowEndTalk community Moderator. My technical interests include all things Unix, perl, python, shell scripting, and relational database systems. I enjoy writing technical articles here on LowEndBox to help people get more out of their VPSes.

windows 10 – Massive temporary file after a BSOD

I was trying to do what was suggested here, I got the Windows 10 BSOD that collected results up to 55 or 60% then restarted. After the restart, I got a massive 2.31 GB file named DUMP18c7.tmp in the root folder of the drive where the equally massive pagefile resides.
At that time, I was doing this check on some very old and rare movies.

I think ffmpeg was only reading files, but what are the chances that the files were corrupted and in general do crashes, BSODs and power loss corrupt files while only being read such as a video or song being played?

To get an idea about the tmp file, I’ve tried Blue screen viewer and it didn’t return anything, so what can I do with it? what does it contain?

Note, I shouldn’t theoretically suffer from issues related to memory since I have 8 GB.

❕NEWS – A top trader at Bitfinex predicts massive Altcoins extinction before the next Bitcoin rally | Proxies123.com

As per Daily hodl, the top trader Joe007 says that before the next bitcoin rally, many altcoins will experiencing downward spiral to oblivion. Not only that, Joe007 who is also topped the Bitfinex’s trading leaderboard also says that in short term, bitcoin will likely to enter a bearish position. Nonetheless, he is still believe in bitcoin long term viability and rise to bullish position in the next few months. What do you think about his prediction?

MASSIVE Identity column value jump in SQL Server 2014

So in the middle of basic coding and testing we saw a huge non-patterned jump in Identity values for multiple tables. We are unaware of any server blips or attempted bulk operations, but DBAs are looking into logs. The gaps are not the typical 1,000 or 10,000 seen with server restarts and such. The gap for Application_NO is 10,410,345 for a table with 2,320 rows and Transaction_Payment_NO jumped an astonishing 1,712,149,313 for a table with 685 records. Any ideas on what could be causing such large and seemingly arbitrary jumps.

Identity value jumps on multiple tables

plotting – BoxWhiskerChart features breaking with massive WeightedData datasets

I have huge WeightedData objects (500K) that I am trying to plot in BoxWhiskerChart. I can get the default chart, but if I try and use the “Outliers” option, it breaks and hits a recursion limit.

Sample Code based on documentation section “Basic Examples”:
create 8 weighted datasets:

random500Klist = RandomVariate(NormalDistribution(RandomInteger(5), 1), {8, 500000});  
randomWeightedData = WeightedData(#, #^2) & /@ random500Klist;  

Make box and whisker chart:

BoxWhiskerChart(randomWeightedData, {"Outliers", {"Outliers", 
   "(FilledCircle)"}, {"FarOutliers", "(EmptyCircle)"}}, 
 ChartStyle -> 56)

Error outputs:

$RecursionLimit::reclim2: Recursion depth of 1024 exceeded during evaluation of AugmentedData`ValidAugmentedDataQ(WeightedData()).

$RecursionLimit::reclim2: Recursion depth of 1024 exceeded during evaluation of WeightedData().

$RecursionLimit::reclim2: Recursion depth of 1024 exceeded during evaluation of AugmentedData`ValidAugmentedDataQ(WeightedData()).

General::stop: Further output of $RecursionLimit::reclim2 will be suppressed during this calculation.

Any way to resolve?

Massive operational security hole

Everything is based on phones now. If I have someone phone I can reset their Salesforce password, access any SAS services etc.

Assume this

  1. Hacker finds someones phone nunber
  2. Hacker buys a tmobile franchise
  3. Looks up the imei for that phone number at tmobile
  4. Finds what services they use (eg salesforce)
  5. Calls Salesforce from that number on a cloned sim card, does 2fa, resets password and gets into the account

How could this be prevented? Is everything ultimately based on phones now?

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popup – Since late 2019, why are we seeing a massive increase in pop-up notifications, and why do UI designers think this is a good idea?

This might be slightly broad, but I think most of the questions on this site are somewhat subjective and broad anyway.

Since about late 2019, the number of pop-up notifications and potentially similar types of notifications has suddenly increased dramatically. Every other time I open a website or a program on my computer, even if it’s something I use every day, I keep having to dismiss notifications that I simply don’t care about. Quite often these notifications are designed to let the user know about certain updates and UI tweaks . . . but they’re completely irrelevant 99% of the time and are quite stressful and distracting from the core features of the website or program.

Stack Exchange responded very well to a related question and has generally kept their sites very clean from this type of thing. Personally I feel that is one of the reasons Stack Exchange is as popular as it is: While it does provide notifications, they are generally relevant, and they are generally not distracting pop-ups that have to be dismissed.

In that context, notifications are great, but pop-up notifications and irrelevant distractions are deterrents against continued use of a site. So why, just about everywhere else except SE, have pop-up notifications suddenly multiplied since late 2019, and why do UI designers not see this as a bad thing?