Spells – How does Split Ray apply to Light of Lunia?

I ran into the Lunia Light spell in the Spell Compendium (p132) and wondered how exactly Metamagic would apply. Split Ray in particular interests me, since I would love a way to get an additional beam.

Luneia light

Evocation (Good, Light)
Level: Celestia 1, Cleric 1, Sorcerer / Magician 1,
Components: V, S
Casting time: 1 standard action
Range: Medium (100 feet + 10 feet / level)
Objective: you and up to two rays; see text
Duration: 10 minutes / level (D) or until discharge; see text
Saving Throw: None
Spell Resistance: yes; see text

You invoke the powers of good and begin to shine with the silver light of the legendary Lunia, the first layer of the Seven Heaven of Celestia.
The silver glow created by this spell emanates from you within a 30-foot radius, and the dim light extends for an additional 30 feet.
Starting a turn after casting this spell, you can choose to spend part or all of Lunia's light as a ray of light. You must succeed in a remote touch attack with lightning to hit a target. You can perform a single tactile ranged attack that deals 1d6 points of damage or 2d6 points of damage against undead or evil strangers, with a range of 30 feet. Spell resistance applies to this attack. This dims its silver glow in half (15-foot light, with dim light for an additional 15 feet). You can choose to shoot an additional beam with the same characteristics in the same round or in a later round. Shooting the second ray extinguishes your glare and ends the spell.

How exactly [light] Y [darkness] interfere?

Let's say I buy an opaque gray stone for 25 gp. I ask my friend to throw Continuous Flame on the stone.

Then I venture into a dungeon with said Floating Stone around my head and suddenly enter a room with a deeper Darkness cast over something, a spell that has killed a good number of unprepared adventurers. What about the lighting now? … Oh, I think I forgot who my friend was, the one who launched Continuous Flame. Could be…

  • Alice, a level 3 wizard.
  • Bob, a level 5 cleric.
  • Clara, a level 6 Arcanist who always uses Spell Spell when casting Continuous Flame.
  • Dan, a level 7 wizard who throws a continuous continuous flame from level 4.

Oh, I also carry a worldly torch with me! Just in case!

I know that

Light spells counteract and dissipate dark spells of an equal or lower level.

However, this does not seem to be the case here: dissipate and counter-spell are activities that require actively casting a spell with the intention of dissipating or counteracting, respectively. Or is it somehow the case? ..

So…

  1. How would these castings interfere?
  2. Will the mundane torch help in any way?
  3. Can a creature with deeper Darkness at will eliminate in any way any of those possible versions of Continuous Flame?
  4. If so, do you need to touch my Ioun Stone for that?

Your answer should be based solely on rules, and if the rules are dark or silent, it should be explicitly noted.

Power: Macbook Pro (mid 2015) will not turn on even without the battery connected, the Magsafe light is amber

My Macbook Pro (mid 2015) does not turn on.

I recently replaced the keyboard and after reassembling everything and turning it on, the battery condition said "replace now", I didn't have this problem before replacing the keyboard.

It stayed that way for about a week and I could only turn on my Macbook with the Magsafe connected, there was no power coming from the battery. However, I don't think it was a battery problem, since my Macbook will restart after about 5 minutes, even with the battery disconnected. So it seems like a software problem or something.

Now I can't even turn on my Macbook. The battery is disconnected and I am trying to power the Magsafe, which should work, but it does not work. I have tried an SMC restart countless times without success. At first, the Magsafe light was changing color, indicating that an SMC reset has been recognized, but now even the light will not change color when I attempt an SMC reset.

If my Macbook does not even turn on when I try to turn it on using only the magsafe and with the battery connected, what could be the problem? Macbooks are supposed to turn on automatically when Magsafe is connected if the battery is disconnected, so I am completely lost.

Nikon: Is this long exposure artifact a sensor defect or a light leak?

I'm filming on the Nikon D800. I suspect it has a sensor defect because there is a very uniform artifactIn my images It seems different from the light leak, since it is always in the same position and has the same character.

My theory is that, in both circumstances, the image data was too small or took too long to build on the sensor because this is a sensor reading pattern that dominates the actual data.

Image one: Sunset + 10 Stop ND + f9.5 + ISO 100- Very very low exposed.

Shooting Details: 638 seconds, ISO 100, f9.5. ND filter
enter the description of the image here

Image two: Lens Cap on, f3.5, ISO 3200.

Shooting Details: 30 seconds, ISO 3200, f3.5. Unfiltered
enter the description of the image here

Measurement: How important is it to have a spot meter on the light meter?

"It is worth it" depends largely on what you are doing, how you approach your photography and what other equipment you plan to use.

If you have a modern digital camera, then its value decreases considerably. If you are working with a large format movie camera, then they are invaluable if you want to carefully inspect the light of the scene before deciding how to take your photo.


In short, a point meter is just another method to measure light and help You decide what the exposure is. In many ways, it is not much more valuable than the "Rule of Sunny 16", while in others it completely ejects a "tool" so primitive from the water.

The key impact of a point meter is to be able to accurately and accurately read a very specific part of the image to judge how bright or dim it really is, and then be able to compare that with other parts of the image.

However, the same effect can be achieved with the careful use of a cell phone camera, especially one that gives you control over exposure.


Spot meters are very useful, but they are not magical devices that will instantly improve your photography. Like other measurement options, their value comes from a careful understanding of their function and how to use them.

If you do not see yourself being able to discuss the merits of where the reflections, midtones, shadows and blacks are It should be Even before taking a photo, it is unlikely that you will find great value on most point meters. However, if you read about topics like The Zone Metering System [based on the work of Ansel Adams and Fred Archer, not the modern digital meter modes found on some cameras] really clicks with you, then a point meter can Easily become your best friend.


Finally, consider your options when it comes to than Meter that buys.

Ideally, you will want a 1 degree meter. Wider gauges may be useful, but they may be more difficult to use well for clean and accurate work, and they run the risk of "murky" results.

You can also find that a solution & # 39; all in one & # 39; It may not be the most effective for you. Personally, I use a small thing from Gossen that fits in my hand for measuring incidents and flash, and I have an old Capital Digital SP II point meter that I picked up cheaply from a distributor of used cameras online. [I find that they have less & # 39; violin points & # 39; with which you can fool, especially the Digital Capital, which has two buttons: one to measure the light and another to block the reading if it is fluttering …]


Possibly a personal bias, but if a light meter does not contain a dial scale that allows you to see all your options for f / stops and shutter speeds for a given exposure, then it is not a & # 39; real & # 39; …

Measurement: How important is it to have a spot meter on the light meter?

"It is worth it" depends largely on what you are doing, how you approach your photography and what other equipment you plan to use.

If you have a modern digital camera, then its value decreases considerably. If you are working with a large format movie camera, then they are invaluable if you want to carefully inspect the light of the scene before deciding how to take your photo.


In short, a point meter is just another method to measure light and help You decide what the exposure is. In many ways, it is not much more valuable than the "Rule of Sunny 16", while in others it completely ejects a "tool" so primitive from the water.

The key impact of a point meter is to be able to accurately and accurately read a very specific part of the image to judge how bright or dim it really is, and then be able to compare that with other parts of the image.

However, the same effect can be achieved with the careful use of a cell phone camera, especially one that gives you control over exposure.


Spot meters are very useful, but they are not magical devices that will instantly improve your photography. Like other measurement options, their value comes from a careful understanding of their function and how to use them.

If you do not see yourself being able to discuss the merits of where the reflections, midtones, shadows and blacks are It should be Even before taking a photo, it is unlikely that you will find great value on most point meters. However, if you read about topics like The Zone Metering System [based on the work of Ansel Adams and Fred Archer, not the modern digital meter modes found on some cameras] really clicks with you, then a point meter can Easily become your best friend.


Finally, consider your options when it comes to than Meter that buys.

Ideally, you will want a 1 degree meter. Wider gauges may be useful, but they may be more difficult to use well for clean and accurate work, and they run the risk of "murky" results.

You can also find that a solution & # 39; all in one & # 39; It may not be the most effective for you. Personally, I use a small thing from Gossen that fits in my hand for measuring incidents and flash, and I have an old Capital Digital SP II point meter that I picked up cheaply from a distributor of used cameras online. [I find that they have less & # 39; violin points & # 39; with which you can fool, especially the Digital Capital, which has two buttons: one to measure the light and another to block the reading if it is fluttering …]


Possibly a personal bias, but if a light meter does not contain a dial scale that allows you to see all your options for f / stops and shutter speeds for a given exposure, then it is not a & # 39; real & # 39; …

What combinations of wide-angle lens and camera are considered particularly resistant to artifacts from street light sources?

I am looking to make a project that involves filming night scenes with many streetlights in the frame and I would like to minimize the flash, ghosts and halos ("solar stars" are expected unless you have found a way to eliminate them too). )

Nikon: my camera responds slowly to my external flash. How can I synchronize my flash light response with my Canon 4000D?

I bought a flash for my Canon 4000D camera. A Canon "Digitalmart" flash to be precise. Fortunately, they work hand in hand, both devices interact with each other. The camera reads that a flash is connected and the flash also reads the camera information.

The problem I face is that, the Flash responds to the camera shutter, but the image is still dark. In the sense that the camera does not read the flash fast enough. Then, when the flash is turned on, the camera does not respond quickly to the light or the camera responds too quickly before the light turns on. Either way, take dark images. What could I fix then? Could it be a stage? I have problems loading images, so I would simply write my flash settings to the camera.

External flash enabled
Flash mode: E-TLL II
Shutter Sync – First Curtain
FEB – 2
Flash exp. Com – +2
E TLL II Meter – Evaluate
Zoom: 24 mm

External flash settings
E TLL
F5.6
24mm

I heard that it is possible to edit questions. If someone understands my point, do it to amend my question.
I have an invitation to cover Wednesday and I didn't expect this to happen now. Your answers and opinions will be greatly appreciated.

dnd 5e – Do moonless nights cause dim light to turn dark and bright light (for example, from torches) to become dim light?

The absence of a light source does not affect the brightness of another

The brightness of a torch does not depend on the superposition of its light with some source of backlight, such as moonlight. This is evident from the fact that a torch works just as well underground in a dark cavern (where there is certainly no moonlight) than on an illuminated night (or without a moon) on the surface.

In addition, moonlight is normally considered darkness, as explained in the description of darkness in the Vision and Light section of the rules (emphasis added):

Darkness creates a very obscured area. The characters face the dark outdoors at night (even most moon nights), within the confines of a dull dungeon or an underground vault, or in an area of ​​magical darkness.

Therefore, there is generally no mechanical difference between a moonlit night and a moonless night anyway.

I can't find anything in the rules that explicitly explains how lighting from multiple light sources is combined, but the most logical rule that comes to mind is: the brightest light source prevails. That is, if an object is illuminated by a bright light and a dim light, that object is brightly illuminated. If another object is illuminated by two dim light sources, it is dimly illuminated.

However, your DM can set new rules

Despite the above, the DM can implement any rule that it wishes. It is possible that the "non-magical" darkness of this moonless night is just a different kind of magic. The Compendium of wise advice explains:

You may be thinking: "Dragons seem pretty magical to me." And yes, they are extraordinary! Their description even says they are magical. But our game makes a distinction between two types of magic:

  • the background magic that is part of the physics of the D&D multiverse and the physiology of many D&D creatures
  • The concentrated magical energy contained in a magical or channeled object to create a spell or other focused magic effect

In D&D, the first type of magic is part of nature. It is no more dissipable than the wind. A monster like a dragon exists because of that improved magical nature. The second type of magic is what concerns the rules. When a rule refers to something being magical, it refers to that second type.

Given this, it would not be unreasonable for the DM to decide that in the world they are building, the darkness of a night without moonlight is not a mere absence of light, but also has a slight supernatural advantage that makes all light a bit dimmer This would be especially appropriate in a terror themed campaign.

dnd 5e – A torch in the dark: what is the level of light?

The absence of a light source does not affect the brightness of another

The brightness of a torch does not depend on the superposition of its light with some source of backlight, such as moonlight. This is evident from the fact that a torch works just as well underground in a dark cavern (where there is certainly no moonlight) than on an illuminated night (or without a moon) on the surface. In addition, the moonlight is normally considered darkness, as explained in the description of Darkness in the Vision and Light section of the rules (emphasis added):

Darkness creates a very obscured area. The characters face the dark outdoors at night (even most moon nights), within the confines of a dull dungeon or an underground vault, or in an area of ​​magical darkness.

Therefore, there is generally no mechanical difference between a moonlit night and a moonless night anyway.

I can't find anything in the rules that explicitly explains how lighting from multiple light sources is combined, but the most logical rule that comes to mind is: the brightest light source prevails. That is, if an object is illuminated by a bright light and a dim light, that object is brightly illuminated. If another object is illuminated by two dim light sources, it is dimly illuminated.

However, your DM can set new rules

Despite the above, the DM can implement any rule that it wishes. It is possible that the "non-magical" darkness of this moonless night is just a different kind of magic. The Compendium of wise advice explains:

You may be thinking: "Dragons seem pretty magical to me." And yes, they are extraordinary! Their description even says they are magical. But our game makes a distinction between two types of magic:

  • the background magic that is part of the physics of the D&D multiverse and the physiology of many D&D creatures
  • The concentrated magical energy contained in a magical or channeled object to create a spell or other focused magic effect

In D&D, the first type of magic is part of nature. It is no more dissipable than the wind. A monster like a dragon exists because of that improved magical nature. The second type of magic is what concerns the rules. When a rule refers to something being magical, it refers to that second type.

Given this, it would not be unreasonable for the DM to decide that in the world they are building, the darkness of a night without moonlight is not a mere absence of light, but also has a slight supernatural advantage that makes all light a bit dimmer This would be especially appropriate in a terror themed campaign.