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readability: to what extent is the blank text on a medium to light gray background objectively a bad practice?

I made the mistake of openly criticizing a web page because they asked me for an opinion. I ruled negatively. To what extent is the designer guilty of my unfavorable criticism?

Legibility judged objectively?

Here intrinsic and external factors intervene, such as monitors and eyes.

The small text, from 8 to 10px, white, in a solid tone of gray, which is somewhere between 10 and 35%, still made me fall a "star" … probably because the LCD helped me. The viewing angle of the screen, the density of pixels, maybe even the reflection of the screen could have influenced me. However, am I to blame or is this supposed to be avoided?

Since I have a slight astigmatism, I should not appreciate small sources that are too thin or light. But actually I use this configuration at this time for my desktop environment, with supbixel processing enabled as a necessity to render the font correctly, it is very thin. I'm not blind

Is it sustainable that one should not have to weigh such external factors, if one adheres to good practices, as a greater contrast between the text and the fund?

There was also no real need to choose such a clear gray. What finally gave me the impression of being careless, while the author could have tried to keep things warm and cozy with his choice of colors.

Relevance issues

The thing is that the user is not reading a poem with this configuration. I'm talking about the menu items that will only be read really until the user learns instinctively in the third word of the row.

Personally, I think readability is important. But good practices are not rules and I can not penalize the author because he violated Article X. Is this still somehow objectively A misstep from a UX perspective or is it rather that I was prone to simply "finding fault" subjectively, frustrated by not being able to read some words at a glance? To what extent is the white text on a light gray background objectively a bad practice?

Bonus question in the same line:

This menu was also hidden unnecessarily from the view, until it was invoked by a click. This superfluity made me fall another star, since it gets in the way of efficient interaction. Except, it's just an additional click. However, making a furore in the dynamics for the sake of having dynamics can be done without getting in the way.

The same question. Did I hold a valid resentment? Should the author get it or rather be offended?

The mid-2013 MacBook Air is charging well but the cable light is off

I tried restarting the SMC since I saw that this was suggested repeatedly as the solution, but this did nothing. The computer charges well, but there is no light on the cable. Any other suggestions? Am I damaging the computer using it with the light off?

mid 2013 mac air charging fine, but the cable light is off

I tried restarting the SMC since I saw that this was suggested repeatedly as the solution, but this did nothing. The computer charges well, but there is no light on the cable. Any other suggestions? Am I damaging the computer using it with the light off?

Team recommendation: Will upgrading from T3i to T7i be a significant improvement for low light photography in the jungle of Costa Rica?

I recently got into photography (a few months), I feel like I'm progressing fast and I have a firm knowledge of camera settings, although I'm working on the experience.

I'm getting closer, but I'm still not in a position to take photos as well as my phone's camera: Pixel 2 (My phone takes low-light photos of moving animals in ~ 50 iso, IDK if I can compete with that! )

My main objective is to be able to take pictures of wildlife (mostly mammals) from a distance. After a lot of reading, I'm worried that on my trip to Costa Rica, where I keep reading that the canopy of the jungle leads to necessarily high ISO levels, that my camera does not keep up.

I am currently using a Canon T3i legacy and I am thinking of upgrading to a T7i for that reason (higher ISO tolerances), as well as the 16% resolution increase.

I plan to mainly use a 55-250 IS STM lens, as well as my "ingenious 50". I have a flash with a diffuser and a tripod.
I read that spending money on a lens is probably a better option, but I wonder because of the low light conditions that, in this case, it would be better to update the body. I am not too interested in additional functions, etc., I just want good photos that I will not regret.

Thanks for the advice!

autofocus: the best setting for focusing in low light and low contrast conditions

I've been filming for several years in northern Canada and I realize that I do not get a really high percentage of goalkeepers when I use my Canon 100-400 Mk II or 70-200 F2.8 Mk II with 5DIV or 1DX2.

Even after a careful calibration of the lens, I often get a 50 cm to 100 cm (20 to 40 inch) approach that is problematic when shooting at a dog's face, for example. In this case, they usually come at 10-15 miles per hour, which I try to capture in something like:

  • 1 / 800sec – F5.6 – 400mm – ISO 1600 to 3200
  • The subject is usually at a distance of 50 to 20 m (150 feet-60 feet)
  • Speed ​​10-20 mph
  • temperatures around -20c to -45c (0F to -45F) which makes the camera a bit slow to respond.
  • Subject with very low contrast.

What would be the best way to achieve the approach:

  • 1 Would you use only one focus point or would you use an extended area approach?
  • 2 One Shot AF to avoid using tracking that does not seem to work
    Anyway or AI Servo?
  • 3 What point would you use? I usually use the lowest points but
    Looking at the image below that might not be optimal? a little
    confused with that figure.

Type of focus point from https://snapshot.canon-asia.com/article/en/12-powerful-new-features-of-the-eos-5d-mark-iv

  • A: Cross-over: f / 4 horizontal + f / 5.6 or f / 8 vertical
  • B: f / 5.6 or f / 8 vertical focus
  • C: Cross-over: f / 5.6 or f / 8 vertical + f / 5.6 or f / 8
    horizontal
  • D: Double cross-type approach: f / 2.8 right diagonal + f / 2.8 left
    diagonal f / 5.6 or f / 8 vertical + f / 5.6 or f / 8 horizontal

At that point I would take any advice! Maybe I'm just not using tracking correctly … I'm not sure! Also keep in mind that the cold condition makes it difficult to keep the small points in the subject, which is why I usually end up using an extended area approach that could be more difficult for the camera's focus.

Thanks for your contribution!

Tip for autofocus in low light conditions and low contrast

I've been filming for several years in northern Canada and I realize that I do not get a really high percentage of goalkeepers when I use my Canon 100-400 Mk II or 70-200 F2.8 Mk II with 5DIV or 1DX2.

Even after a careful calibration of the lens, I often get a 50 cm to 100 cm (20 to 40 inch) approach that is problematic when shooting at a dog's face, for example. In this case, they usually come at 10-15 miles per hour, which I try to capture in something like:

  • 1 / 800sec – F5.6 – 400mm – ISO 1600 to 3200
  • The subject is usually at a distance of 50 to 20 m (150 feet-60 feet)
  • Speed ​​10-20 mph
  • temperatures around -20c to -45c (0F to -45F) which makes the camera a bit slow to respond.
  • Subject with very low contrast.

What would be the best way to achieve the approach:

  • 1 Would you use only one focus point or would you use an extended area approach?
  • 2 One Shot AF to avoid using tracking that does not seem to work
    Anyway or AI Servo?
  • 3 What point would you use? I usually use the lowest points but
    Looking at the image below that might not be optimal? a little
    confused with that figure.

Type of focus point from https://snapshot.canon-asia.com/article/en/12-powerful-new-features-of-the-eos-5d-mark-iv

  • A: Cross-over: f / 4 horizontal + f / 5.6 or f / 8 vertical
  • B: f / 5.6 or f / 8 vertical focus
  • C: Cross-over: f / 5.6 or f / 8 vertical + f / 5.6 or f / 8
    horizontal
  • D: Double cross-type approach: f / 2.8 right diagonal + f / 2.8 left
    diagonal f / 5.6 or f / 8 vertical + f / 5.6 or f / 8 horizontal

At that point I would take any advice! Maybe I'm just not using tracking correctly … I'm not sure! Also keep in mind that the cold condition makes it difficult to keep the small points in the subject, which is why I usually end up using an extended area approach that could be more difficult for the camera's focus.

Thanks for your contribution!

I want to take a picture of a white light interferogram.

I can see a clear pattern of interference by "eyeball". But my iPhone can not deal with the dynamic range, yes, I know that our vision system is great. But what type of camera imitates our vision system?

Non-dynamic light particles in the unit.

I know Unity has an advanced system for managing complex dynamic particle systems with a few thousand elements (Shuriken).

Does Unity have a lighter way of creating a very, very large particle system (several million on stage) that is basically a large cloud of poster points oriented to the camera that is created, then simply sits on the scene (recalculate) the normal ones as needed in a non-blocking manner as the camera moves, but doing nothing) until it is destroyed and replaced in its entirety one minute later.

The specific application that I have in mind is to show the weather radar. The weather radar consists of multiple sweeps of 360 degrees, each with different inclinations. The collection of scans performed in a single round is called Volume Scan. What I'm trying to do is render the volume scan for a whole radar site, in a way that allows someone to move the camera and look at it from different points of view, by seeing the structure of the storm in 3D.

The important thing to remember is that the scene represented by the camera must be able to change with an acceptable frame rate as the user looks around and moves it, but the underlying point cloud that is being represented by the particles changes as sumo every 60 seconds. . The only thing that could really be considered "dynamic" could be to recalculate the normals for each point as the camera moves.

Similarly, assuming that the normal recalculation for a particle system of more than 4 million is not instantaneous, at least I hope it can be done nonblocking (I prefer to get 60 fps with most of the particles facing it incorrectly) at any time, then have them adjust gradually to the camera once it stops, so that the world stops completely while the Unit recalculates the normal ones).

I'm pretty sure OpenGL in the rough and OpenGL ES can do this with acceptable performance, but I'm trying to stick to Unity by keeping my application somewhat portable (initially targeting "normal Android" by having something that you can not really make money immediately, but eventually it extends to support Android VR, Oculus, Magic Leap, HoloLens, etc. (even if only by having portfolio projects to show).

So … Unity has something like this? At this time, I do not necessarily need step-by-step instructions … more like some suggestions on what to look for, or where to look for documentation, since almost everything related to particles I have found for Unity so far seems to be totally focused on Shuriken.

news and weather – best light laptops

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List of the 5 best lightweight laptops in India (2019)
The best ultrabooks of this season, 2019, which can be combined with the prices, of course, on the slightly higher but worthy side and in general availability. There are some top 5 more Lightweight laptops in India Those who like everyone.

Microsoft Surface notebook
In the fifth area is the Microsoft Surface notebook, which is a complete classic notebook designed by Microsoft. Italian imported fabric decorated the computer keyboard in impressive 13.5 inches and 3.2
On the PixelSense screen, there are many things that I like about surface laptops in terms of design and aesthetics. When you spend a little more time using this machine, you will find a computer that is much more competent than Apple's most expensive 12-inch MacBook.
You'll find at least one Intel Core i5 chip, 4 gigabytes of RAM, Intel HD 620 images along with a 128-gigabyte SSD. The only complaint about this surface laptop is the fact that it is Windows 10S, which certainly limits the amount of things it can actually do in this system.
Reaching a fourth place, we have Asus Zenbook 3, which is just another computer that will make you think of a 12-inch MacBook. One of the thinnest and lightest laptops on the market, it actually has a pretty decent bump where you'll find an Intel Core i5 or i7 chip, 16 gigabytes of RAM along with 512 gigabytes of storage.
The screen looks pretty good with a 12.5-inch Full HD screen. There are only a couple of concessions that you will receive with this laptop instead of the computer keyboard. Asus is trying to imitate what Apple did with the butterfly mechanism for the keys, however, they definitely were not very successful and the keyboard only has an effective feeling machine, but the use of a fingerprint scanner for this laptop in particular is in the upper right corner of this trackpad.
However, in general, if you are in the market for a notebook as thin as it is light, it will be fine with some concessions that really are not that bad.