Will a Nikon AF-S Nikkor 50mm 1: 1.8 G lens work on my Nikon D3100 series camera?

Will an AF-S Nikkor 50mm 1:1.8G work well with my with Nikon D3100?

lens – Will Nikon AF-S “G” lenses autofocus on D3xxx bodies?

When I checked the site of Nikon for D3300 camera, I found following description

Autofocus is available with AF-S and AF-I lenses; Autofocus is not
available with other type G and D lenses, AF lenses (IX NIKKOR and
lenses for the F3AF are not supported) and AI-P lenses; Non-CPU lenses
can be used in mode M but the camera exposure meter will not function
The electronic rangefinder can be used with lenses that have a maximum
aperture of f/5.6 or faster

Source

I am confused with what it means. Does it mean that auto-focus is not supported for following version (for example)

  • Nikon 18-200mm F/3.5-5.6G IF-ED AF-S VR II DX

because it has “G” mentioned in aperture? I am confused because it says that it is auto focus.

I usually choose focal point to focus on subject while taking pictures but I use auto while shooting videos. As now I am planning to shoot more videos so do I have to worry about these properties?

lens – Best solution for under/over waterline shots with Olympus tg-6

I’m looking for a piece of advice. My main camera is a crop sensor entry level DSLR that I rarely end up taking anywhere unless I’m on holiday because of its chunkiness and weight. So a few months back I thought I need a versatile compact one to always have in my bag, just as I used to in my pre-DSLR (and pre-smartphone) days. What I had back then was an Olympus mju 8000 Tough, so naturally I gravitated towards its 2020 counterpart the Olympus TG-6, the key factor being combining portability with underwater and macro features. There was a moment of hesitation between that and the GoPro hero7, but since I felt the GoPro is more video than photo oriented and I’m not quite comfortable with its minimalistic menu as opposed to the Olympus one that I was more or less familiar with, I decided in favour of the latter.

Now I’m looking to get it a dome lens for some nice over/under water footage but I’m only finding third party ones that all connect to additional underwater casing. The cost of both amounts to $650+ which is more than the camera itself. I don’t need the casing as I won’t be diving below 15m anytime soon. So the question is, do you know of any alternatives that can be mounted straight onto the body and/or has anyone tried to do this type of shots with the native FCON-T01 Fisheye Converter. There are much cheaper dome cases for the go so I’m starting to second guess my choice.

lens design – Why there are so few lenses with small minimum focus distance?

The focal length of a lens is a calculation made when the lens is imaging an object at infinity. This is a distance as far “as the eye can see” symbol ∞. As we focus on objects nearer than infinity, we must lengthen the distance, lens to sensor (film). The now elongated distance is called “back focus”. The lens to sensor/film extension becomes large. As we focus to achieve “life-size”, often called “unity” or 1:1 magnification, the lens will be racked forward 1 complete focal length, and the distance object to sensor/film will be 4 times the focal length. What I am trying to tell you is, the amount of mechanical extension to reach magnification 1 (life-size), is one compete focal length.

So, to make a lens close focus and reach unity requires lots of room to rack the lens forward. This is actually not too difficult, but now for the rest of the story. The f/numbers we know and love, that are engraved on the lens, are calculated from the infinity focus position. As we close focus, the engraved position marks for the f/number settings become invalid. At magnification 1 (unity), the error is 2 f/stops. This is a problem because we tend to underexpose when we close focus.

This f/number error is called “bellows factor”. If the camera reads the exposure measuring thru-the-lens, bellows factor is not an issue. If the exposure is determined by an external light meter, it is a big problem. As rule of thumb — most camera makers (lens makers) stop the forward travel of the lens when the bellows factor error approaches 1/3 of an f/stop. The macro lens design is clever in that the lens array portion ahead of the iris diaphragm is a strong magnifier. As we focus close-up the magnification makes the diameter of the aperture opening appear larger. This magnification of the aperture allows more light to transverse the lens. This is how the macro design nullifies the bellows factor error.

Naturally it costs more to incorporate this design; so many lens makers stop the forward movement as the bellows factor approaches 1/3 f/stop.

lens – Best solution for under/over shots with Olympus tg-6

I’m looking for a piece of advice. My main camera is a crop sensor entry level DSLR that I rarely end up taking anywhere unless I’m on holiday because of its chunkiness and weight. So a few months back I thought I need a versatile compact one to always have in my bag, just as I used to in my pre-DSLR (and pre-smartphone) days. What I had back then was an Olympus mju 8000 tough, so naturally I gravitated towards its 2020 counterpart the Olympus tg-6, the key factor being combining portability with underwater and macro features. There was a moment of hesitation between that and the GoPro hero7, but since I felt the go pro is more video than photo oriented and I’m not quite comfortable with its minimalistic menu as opposed to the Olympus one that I was more or less familiar with, I decided in favour of the latter.
Now I’m looking to get it a dome lens for some nice over/under water footage but I’m only finding third party ones that all connect to additional underwater casing. The cost of both amounts to $650+ which is more than the camera itself. I don’t need the casing as I won’t be diving below 15m anytime soon. So the question is, do you know of any alternatives that can be mounted straight onto the body and/or has anyone tried to do this type of shots with the native FCON-T01 Fisheye Converter. There are much cheaper dome cases for the go so I’m starting to second guess my choice.

Does a DSLR lens have a shutter speed?

As in comments, lenses don’t really have a maximum shutter time, they just let light through continuously, blocked by the camera’s shutter from hitting the sensor.

Even though the camera’s maximum internally-timed shutter is 30 seconds, it also has two ‘long’ modes, Bulb & Time. These are available in manual mode only.
They are essentially the same thing, but triggered slightly differently.
Bulb will keep the shutter open so long as the release button is held, Time will open on the first press, close on the second.

This would all be made considerably less shaky by using a cheap wired remote from eBay [$£€ 10 or so]. Also using either live view, mirror up or a shutter release delay.

dslr – Shutter speed: Camera vs Lens

I was analysing combination of Nikon D5600 and AF-P DX NIKKOR 10-20MM F/4.5-5.6G VR mainly for Northern lights photo purpose.
Nikkor lens which i am analysing is not a fast lens so i will need use slow shutter. I noticed that D5600 has a 30 second slowest shutter speed but lens has 20 second shutter speed.

In this scenario what will be the shutter speed used while using them in combination, will it be 20 second or 30 second?

maximal detail in extreme low light: longer lens or shorter and faster lens?

Have you considered flash? A cobra-head zooming flash going to 200mm tends to have a guide number of about 70 at that length. Its reach at F2.8 and ISO25600 would be 400m. For full exposure.

When working with a 200mm lens, 400m is actually quite a distance. Though you would want to work with a dark background and a lit subject, so you’ll likely reduce exposure time to your flash duration (typically 1/200s) and possibly dial down ISO a bit.

Birds of prey can sit still a lot better than photographers so you could use longer exposure times, too, but particularly with the longer lenses that would require use of a tripod.

As you can see, with 1/50s and the fastest lens, your best is a washed-out silhouette against a noisy backdrop.

There are of course a number of disadvantages for a flash shot, too: probably the worst is that with a shy subject at a good distance you get to have exactly one shot per opportunity. Another is that structures such as pylons might be equipped with reflectors or reflective signs that basically halve the distance to the camera. While you can edit them out in post, they will mess with any metering (like TTL).

Also autofocus is not going to do an overly convincing job.

And there will be the red-eye equivalent of birds’ eyes, and particularly eyes with good nocturnal vision will be affected.

terminology – What do all those cryptic number and letter codes in a lens name mean?

The top answer covers the decoding of the letters very well. Here are a few comments as to what some of the features actually mean in terms of consequences of the features.

Lenses only for reduced frame DSLRs

Most low- to mid-range DSLRs have a sensor that is smaller than a 35mm film frame — sometimes called “reduced frame” or “cropped sensor”. So using a “full frame” lens will mean lots of extra light around the sensor that isn’t used. You can makes lenses smaller and lighter by reducing the projected image size to fit the sensor size. However using these lenses on a full frame camera would result in the corners of the image being dark — and mostly these lenses won’t fit on a full frame camera.

The “less than full frame” codes are:

  • Canon: EF-S (EF for full frame)
  • Nikon: DX (FX for full frame)
  • Pentax: DA (FA or D FA for full frame)
  • Sigma: DC (DG for full frame)
  • Sony/Minolta: DT
  • Tamron: Di II (Di for full frame)

Image Stabilisation/Vibration Reduction

Image Stabilisation is also called Optical Stabilisation, Optical Image Stabilisation, Optical Steady Shot, Vibration Compensation and Vibration Reduction. Does what it says on the tin basically. (Some camera bodies — notably, Olympus and Pentax — have a form of vibration reduction in the body and so don’t have it in the lens).

  • Canon: IS
  • Fujifilm: OIS
  • Nikon: VR
  • Panasonic: OIS
  • Sigma: OS
  • Sony/Minolta: OSS
  • Tamron: VC

Fast and Quiet Focussing Motors

The focussing motors in some lower end lenses can be quite noisy. The higher end lenses are able to focus more quickly (the movements can be more accurately controlled) and are quieter and use less battery. The acronym for it usually includes “Sonic”:

  • Canon: USM Ultrasonic Motor
  • Nikon: SWM Silent Wave Motor
  • Olympus/Zuiko: SWD Supersonic Wave Drive
  • Pentax: SDM Supersonic Drive Motor or newer DC Direct Current
  • Sigma: HSM Hyper-Sonic Motor
  • Sony/Minolta: SSM Super-Sonic Motor
  • Tamron: USD Ultrasonic Silent Drive

Weather Sealing

  • Pentax: WR Weather Resistant or higher-level, AW All Weather (also found on ★ lenses)

Lens Features

There are a variety of lens features to reduce chromatic abberations (where different colours don’t exactly converge) and other imperfections in lens performance. In particular

  • aspherical lens elements have a more complex surface profile that allows for better image quality in exchange for increased cost.

  • low dispersion glass is more free of chromatic aberration.

  • apochromatic denotes a lens which is highly corrected for color, bringing three colors (usually red, green, and blue) into equal focus.

  • Canon: DO Diffractive Optics (Canon does not include information in a lens’ name regarding any fluorite, aspherical, low dispersion, or apochromatic lens elements that may be included in the lens’ optical formula.)

  • Nikon: ED Extra-low Dispersion Glass, ASP Aspherical Lens Element

  • Olympus/Zuiko: ED Extra-low dispersion glass

  • Pentax: ED Extra-low dispersion glass, AL Aspherical Lens Element

  • Sigma: ASP Aspherical lens element, APO Aphochromatic (low-dispersion) lens element

  • Sony/Minolta: AD Anomalous Dispersion, APO Apochromatic correction using AD elements, HS-APO High-Speed APO

  • Tamron: Aspherical or ASL aspherical lens element, AD Anomalous Dispersion, ADH AD + ASL hybrid lens element, HID High Index, High Dispersion Glass, LD Low Dispersion, LAH LD + ASL hybrid lens element, XLD Extra Low Dispersion, XR Extra Refractive Index Glass

  • Tokina: AS Aspherical lens element, F&R Advanced Aspherical lens element, HLD High-Refraction, Low Dispersion, SD Super Low Dispersion

Lens Coatings

There are a variety of lens coatings used to reduce internal reflections and other possible problems. Internal reflections can end up producing ghost images or adding to lens flare. Not all lens manufacturers specify the lens coatings they use.

  • Nikon: NIC Nikon Integrated Coating, SIC Super Integrated Coating
  • Fujifilm: EBC Electron Beam Coating, Nano GI Nanotechnology Gradient Index
  • Pentax: SMC Super Multi Coating, SP Special Protect, HD High Definition
  • Zeiss: T* (pronounced “T-Star”) High-performance Coating
  • Tokina: MC Multi-Coating
  • Yashica: DSB Single-Coating, ML (later MC) Multi-Layer (later Multi-coating)

Macro

Macro lenses can focus very close to the end of the lens, providing (at least) a 1:1 ratio between the size of the object and the size of the image on the sensor. In plain english, you can take very close up shots of flowers, insects and so on. They are just called Macro (or occasionally Micro), making life easy for once.

Focusing

This includes Internal/Inner Focusing (IF) and (Internal) Rear Focusing (RF or IRF). Both of these reduce the number of individual lenses moving inside the lens. They also mean that the front of the lens will not move in or out, or rotate, during focusing. The lack of rotation can be important if, say, you have a circular polarizing filter, or a graduated ND filter fitted to the lens. And the front not moving in or out can be important if the lens is very close to the subject.

Aperture Control Ring

Now that most camera bodies can control the lens’s aperture, some manufacturers have special designation for whether a particular lens has an aperture control ring:

  • Nikon: G lenses (having the letter “G” immediately after the maximum aperture designation) do not have an aperture control ring on the lens.
  • Fujifilm: R lenses (having the letter “R” immediately after the maximum aperture designation) have an aperture control ring on the lens.

High End Lenses

Some manufacturers have a code to indicate their high end lenses:

  • Canon: L Luxury
  • Fujifilm: XF with red badge
  • Pentax: ★ and Limited
  • Sigma: EX Professional EXternal lens body finishing. “Global Vision” lenses are badged A (Art), S (Sport), or C (Contemporary). A and S lenses are considered premium.
  • Sony/Minolta: G Gold Series, GM G-Master Series – a newer (Sony-only) higher-end series
  • Tamron: SP Super Performance

Apodization filters

Some manufacturers include an apodization filter in the lens to improve bokeh:

  • Minolta/Sony: STF (lit., Smooth Transition Focus)
  • Fujifilm: APD

Miscellaneous

Other codes might indicate the mount type (which will indicate whether it will fit your body), whether it will work with a Teleconverter or whether the lens needs the camera body to provide the motor for auto-focussing.

Can Snapbridge, with a Nikon D3500, let you see what the camera lens sees?

Probably not, unless Nikon has changed the way they do the D3x00 series. We’ve got a number of related questions that all deal with the D3x00 series of cameras not having the ability to do tethered shooting. Even Nikon cameras that are capable of tethered shooting don’t give real time Live Views off camera with the major tethering software applications. There are some other apps that claim they can do it with upper tier Nikon cameras, such as the D7x00 series or the three digit (D850, D300, etc.) and single digit (D5, D4,etc.) models.

Is there a way to replicate Nikon D3100 live view on my laptop screen?
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how could I duplicate my Nikon D5300 live view on both my PC and camera itself?
Can I live view my Nikon D3200 via laptop/ tablet etc?
Is Nikon D3200 compatible with external monitor?
How can I use live view while tethering a Nikon D810 to LightRoom 5 CC?
Are there any free Windows programs to get a live view for a Nikon D700 in tethered capture mode?
Nikon D3200 Android USB control