17 hrs layover at Haneda Airport. Do I need a visa to go to the city. Arrives at 4:45 pm and leaves at 9:35 am? [closed]

I have 17 hrs of layover in Haneda Airport. Do I need a visa to go around the city – Arriving at 4:45 pm and leaves at 9:35 am. Thank you!

uk – Is a 13-hour layover in the middle of the night enough time to go see Buckingham Palace?

As you’ve got to make the journey between airports anyway, I say make the most of it. Sleep on the plane if you can and see the city at night. I’d pack in one backpack (hand luggage strapped on top) and do it on foot, but taxi/bus/night tube (Friday and Saturday) are other options.

The last tube train from Heathrow is at 23:35 (T4) or 23:42 (T5), a few minutes later for T123. So you should have plenty of time to clear immigration, retrieve your luggage and get the tube. There’s also the TFL line train but that goes to Paddington station which is 3 km from Buckingham Palace). You can check for planned/emergency issues online at Transport for London’s website.

If you get the tube, you can go to Hyde Park Corner, less than 1 km away from the Palace.

In the morning I used to quite often get an early train out of London Bridge to Gatwick. Currently that looks to be 05:35, getting in at 06:04. That should be plenty early enough for most flights but you’d need to check.

Assuming you’re happy to walk through the night you can see a lot of London. Here’s a quick 10 km route suggestion I threw together. It takes in Buckingham Palace, Parliament Square (but not Big Ben/Elizabeth Tower which is being repaired), the Embankment, Trafalgar Square, Covent Garden, the Strand (you could night-bus this bit), St Paul’s Cathedral, the Tower of London and Tower Bridge.

Here’s a picture in case I carelessly delete the route
Picture of route on Strava

Night buses from Trafalgar square will get you to many places but they’re not very frequent. I’ve deliberately omitted airport buses in the interest of maximising your time in London. The tube and regional trains aren’t all that expensive, and are much quicker; they’re also less much affected by traffic, though there are rare delays in the middle of the night.

An alternative is to cycle all or part of the route – at least if you have a fairly small backpack. There are several bike hire schemes in London. The official (Santander-sponsored) scheme is well regarded. It has its own sightseeing loop suggestions. I rode a route similar to the walking route I suggest above yesterday (as part of a much longer ride). The most significant difference was probably to make good use of the Embankment cycle path. Cycling in London, at least in my limited weekend experience, compares favourably to many UK cities.

Is there any COVID restriction to do a layover in Paris, France?

A friend from Brasil is coming to Spain and she’s found a flight from Sao Paulo with a layover in Paris Charles de Gaulle. She has the Italian passport too. Will she have to do any test or provide any additional documents whatsoever?

usa – European citizen with layover in United States – what documents do I need?

I’m confused by how the US travel ban apply to layovers.

I have a flight from Papeete (French Polynesia) to Paris on October 4 2020. The flight stops at Los Angeles Airport for 2h30.

I will be travelling with a Belgian passport.

What extra documents do I need?

hotels – Sleeping during a long layover during a travel ban

As a USA citizen, I am not allowed to enter Portugal (due to Covid-19 risk,
regardless of my apparent health).

But I have a 25 hour layover in Lisbon, so I am thinking to search the
international transfers area for a food court bench on which to sleep.
I doubt that I will get more than an hour of sleep, so lack of sleep
will probably make me sick.

Are there any better sleeping options?

I have a flight from Istanbul to Vancouver with overnight layover at Montreal. Where do I need to do my quarantine if I decide to spend night at hotel

I have a flight from Istanbul to Vancouver with long overnight layover at Montreal. Where do I need to do my quarantine if I decide to spend night at hotel? Or can I stay at the airport for a night to wait for my flight? Keeping in mind the covid situation

air travel – What do I need to know to make my connecting flight? First time with a layover

When your first flight lands:

  1. Get off the plane, taking your carry-on luggage with you

  2. Look for a monitor displaying departing flights

  3. Find your second flight and note its gate number

  4. Go to that gate and wait until it is time to board.

You will not need to go back through security nor pick up any checked luggage in Denver. You will get boarding passes for both flights when you check in in PDX (or online). If something happens and you lose your second boarding pass, it can be reprinted at the departure gate of your DEN-BNA flight.

DEN has three gate areas, A, B and C; every gate number includes the area letter (e.g. A31, B17). Most likely your DEN-BNA flight will depart from the same gate area where the PDX-DEN flight arrived, in which case you only need to walk east or west along the concourse in the appropriate direction until you find the gate. If you should need to go to a different gate area, they are connected by an underground train, which can be reached by going to the center of the concourse and taking an escalator or elevator down.

canada – Overnight layover in Toronto as of early June 2020?

I’m considering booking a flight from the US to Germany to tend to a family emergency. The connection that I’m currently looking at has an overnight layover in Toronto. Is it possible to use this connection under current circumstances?

To the extent that it matters, I’m a German citizen with a Canadian work permit living in Canada, but have spent the past few months of lockdown in the US. As a temporary resident, I believe that I would be able to enter Canada under current regulations. But returning travellers to Canada are subject to two weeks of quarantine. However, is transit with an overnight layover still possible?

I’d be spending the night at an airport hotel, or inside the airport if necessary.

Is there a way to find out if I need a transit visa for a layover in the UK?

Why yes there is.

This UK government site will tell you if you need a visa to transit through the UK. You enter your nationality, destination, and any visas you already hold, and it will tell you if you need a transit visa or not. It also includes instructions for applying for one.

As a summary (but check for exceptions):

  • You must arrive and depart by air, and your outbound flight must be booked and confirmed.
  • You don’t need a transit visa if you would not need a visa for a tourist visit to the UK.
  • A transit visa comes in two forms: Direct Airside Transit Visa (DATV) which is limited to 24 hours and you must remain ‘airside’ (i.e. cannot pass through immigration) and a Visitor in Transit Visa, which is valid for 48 hours and allows you to change airports (and terminals at airports where you can’t do that airside).
  • You must have all the necessary documentation for your final destination, including any visas.
  • You are exempt from needing a transit visa under certain conditions. These can be found at https://www.gov.uk/check-uk-visa. As of 26 September 2018, the conditions are:

Exemptions

You don’t need a visa if you have one of the following:

  • a visa for Canada, New Zealand, Australia or the USA (this can be used for travel to any country)
  • a residence permit issued by Australia or New Zealand
  • a common format residence permit issued by an European Economic Area (EEA) country or Switzerland
  • a resident permit issued by Canada after 28 June 2002
  • a uniform format category D visa for entry into a country in the European Economic Area (EEA) or Switzerland
  • an Irish biometric visa (marked ‘BC’ or ‘BC BIVS’ in the ‘Remarks’ section)
  • a Schengen Approved Destination Scheme (ADS) group tourism visa where the holder is travelling to the Schengen country that issued the visa
  • a flight ticket from the Schengen area, if you can prove that you entered the Schengen area in the previous 30 days on the basis of a valid Schengen ADS visa
  • a valid USA I-551 Temporary Immigrant visa issued by the USA (a wet-ink stamp version will not be accepted)
  • a valid USA permanent residence card issued by the USA on or after 21 April 1998
  • an expired USA I-551 Permanent Residence card issued by the USA on or after 21 April 1998, with a valid I-797 letter authorising extension
  • a valid standalone US Immigration Form 155A/155B issued by the USA (attached to a sealed brown envelope)

All visas and residence permits must be valid.


You might be eligible for ‘transit without visa’ if:

Transiting without a visa

You might be eligible for ‘transit without visa’ if:

  • you arrive and depart by air (and)
  • have a confirmed onward flight that leaves on the day you arrive or before midnight on the day after you arrive (and)
  • have the right documents for your destination (eg a visa for that country)

One of the following must also apply:

  • you’re travelling to (or on part of a reasonable journey to) Australia, Canada, New Zealand or the USA and have a valid visa for that country
  • you’re travelling from (or on part of a reasonable journey from) Australia, Canada, New Zealand or the USA and have a valid visa for that country
  • you’re travelling from (or on part of a reasonable journey from) Australia, Canada, New Zealand or the USA and it’s less than 6 months since you last entered that country with a valid entry visa
  • you have a residence permit issued by Australia or New Zealand
  • you have a common format residence permit issued by an European Economic Area (EEA) country or Switzerland
  • you have a residence permit issued by Canada issued after 28 June 2002
  • you have a uniform format category D visa for entry to a country in the EEA or Switzerland
  • you have an Irish biometric visa (marked ‘BC’ or ‘BC BIVS’ in the ‘Remarks’ section) and an onward flight ticket to the Republic of Ireland
  • you’re travelling from the Republic of Ireland and it’s less than 3 months since you were last given permission, on the basis of holding a valid Irish biometric visa, to land or be in Ireland
  • you have a valid USA permanent residence card issued by the USA on or after 21 April 1998
  • you have a valid USA I-551 Temporary Immigrant visa issued by the USA (a wet-ink stamp version will not be accepted)
  • you have an expired USA I-551 Permanent Residence card issued by the USA on or after 21 April 1998, with a valid I-797 letter authorising extension
  • you have a valid standalone US Immigration Form 155A/155B issued by the USA (attached to a sealed brown envelope)

You won’t be able to transit without a visa if a Border Force officer decides you don’t qualify under the immigration rules. You can apply for a transit visa before you travel if you’re unsure whether you qualify for transiting without a visa.

E-visas or e-residence permits are not acceptable for transiting through immigration control without a visa.

All visas and residence permits must be valid.

Australian paper confirmation slips are not accepted.

If you need more information than is provided by this website you will need to check with your airline or contact the UKVI. The Home Office’s Charging Procedures – A Guide for Carriers also provides some guidance on the subtler points of the rules (it’s intended for professionals, not passengers, but does explain in great details when a visa is or is not required).

Transiting airside

In London Heathrow, London Gatwick and Manchester, if you fly from outside the UK or Ireland and leave to another country (neither UK nor Ireland), it is possible to transit without entering the UK and going through UK Border Control, you can stay airside. There is no hotel airside, and the transit areas close overnight, so if you have an overnight stopover, you have to go through UK Border Control. There is a detailed guide available on Heathrow airport website.

People on any kind of valid UK visa that is senior to a transit visa do not need an additional visa. It means the person can transit on a category “C” (visitor), category “D” (PBS), and so on.

The policy is not available on the net. I wrote to the policy unit using my lawyer hat and got this reply…

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They are thinking about including this in the written guidance. Maybe they will, maybe they won’t.

19-hour layover at haneda airport without a japan visa

My flight from Detroit to Haneda Airport to Manila, do I need to obtain a transit visa, because my stopover at Haneda Airport is 19 hours.