Lens – Kodak Retina IIS filter wire

I inherited an IIS Retina, which is the most common fixed lens variant of the IIIS. I have not been able to find a manual for him, although the IIIS manual is fine for almost everything.

What that manual does not let's say it's the lens filter thread, and I want / need a yellow filter to make it a bit more habitable on bright days. The lens is made by Schneider-Kreuznach and describes itself as Retina-Xenar 45mm f / 2.8 and is in a Synchro-Compur shutter. I know that the thread is a little smaller than 30.5 mm because I have a lot of 30.5 mm filters: I suspect it is 30 mm, but I would like to avoid spending money on a 30 mm filter just to find that it is something strange (I guess which is metric since the camera is German, but even that is not certain maybe).

So, does anyone definitely know what the thread is for this camera?

Old lenses: how to mount a Kodak Vest Pocket lens on an EF-M camera?

While I agree that it is fun to adapt "weird" lenses, I also agree with Alan Marcus's implication that there are better lenses to adapt.

  • According to the information on the Wiki page of the camera about Vest Pocket Kodak, which has linked, the lenses used in the camera were approximately 72 mm f / 6.8. That gives a FOV equivalent to approximately 115 mm on a full-frame sensor. Some newer models seem to have faster openings (f / 4.9), but are linked to more complicated mechanisms that would be more difficult to disassemble and adapt.

    This may improve a bit if you use a focal reducer as one of your adapters. That would "convert" the lens into a more reasonable 52mm f / 4.9, which is similar to the long end of a typical kit lens.

  • The parts of the video that were recorded with the adapted lens appear slightly blurred and heavily processed. Another problem with old lenses is the glare of the veil due to the lack or lack of coatings. If you want a character Lens, this is great. Otherwise, it could be disappointing.

If you still want to adapt the lens, depending on what you see in the video, it should be quite simple. The main task is to obtain the correct flange focal length. I don't know what it is for this purpose, but it seems quite long. Here are some components to consider:

  • M42 to EF-Madapter, focal reduceror helical adapter.
  • M42 to M42 helicopter . The video seems to show a 17-31mm Helical A 12-19mm shorter is also available. If you have the lens in your hand, you can estimate the distance with free lenses. This will also serve as your focus helicoid. (Search for "M42 helicoid" at your favorite auction site).

  • M42 cap with a hole of appropriate size drilled in it. Wraprubber bandsor tape around the end of the lens to hold it in place. If you don't want to wait for shipping, the 1L bottle cap of some sports drinks also fits M42.

Another problem is the shutter mechanism.I can't tell by the video if the shutter speed is adjustable. There are two options:

  • Set a long exposure on the camera and use the lens shutter mechanism to expose the image. I would control the exposure by setting the shutter speed on the lens (if adjustable) and selecting an appropriate ISO. You may also be able to adjust the lens aperture (I can't see it in the video).
  • Keep the lens shutter open and use the camera shutter to expose the image. This is the most convenient option. However, I cannot say in the video if the shutter has a bulb mode or if it would have to be removed. Since part of the video was filmed with the adapted lens, it is probably easy enough to solve once you have the lens in your hand.

Here are relevant screenshots of the video:

remove lens 1
remove lens 2
adapter + helicoid + cover + rubber band
trigger

35 mm – Should Kodak Vision 500T film be used with ISO 400 or 800?

The Rem-Jet layer (jet black removable backing) is a dispersion of lamp black (soot) in a cellulosic phthalate acetate binder. This binder is an "acid plastic." It can be softened and washed with an alkaline solution. Machine processing uses a pre-bath to temporarily harden the film, so that it resists better transport in a fast-moving film processor. The pre-bath softens the Rem-Jet and the rotating rollers, just as the paint rollers eliminate the Rem-Jet.

You can make an alkaline solution and polish by hand with a well-washed "T" shirt. This can be done, the film has been processed but before drying. Water 27 to 38 ° C (80 to 100 ° F) 800 ml 800 ml Borax solution 15 g / L use 20 g Sodium sulfate (anhydrous) 100 g Sodium hydroxide 1.0 g Water to make 1 L

The Rem-Jet serves to protect the film from exposure from the rear. Many film cameras with viewfinders through the lens filtered light if the photographer looked away. It serves as an anti-pull back. Protects the film when large rolls are loaded and unloaded in dim light.

Does anyone know if the retreat sentence to the exhibition has an effect on the speed of the movie? If so, why is this?

Should I use Kodak Vision 500T as ISO 400 or 800 ISO?

Vision3 500T hand-rolled, but I would like to know which is the best ISO to use 400 or 800, and why?

Thank you.

I bought a bag of 25 unopened boxes of KODAK Tri-X Pan 620 and 120 in the box film

I would consider doing stand processing on this roll. If it does not develop, now would be an excellent time to start, as laboratories do not offer stand development.

Traditional development is relatively very accurate. That is, traditional development is very sensitive to exposure, temperature and time. Development in this way generally lasts 7 to 15 minutes, while the development tank is stirred every (half a minute) or so.

Stand development is the opposite of traditional development. With the development of the support, use a very diluted developer and simply let the film sit in the tank (usually) for more than an hour, without shaking the tank. Because of this, you have much more exposure margin. This will need it, because the expired movie during this time will not behave as expected, although the rule of 1 stop per decade is definitely a good one to follow.

There is also a semi-stand development, which included minimal agitation.


Links for you to read (general development and stand development:
1. https://www.adorama.com/alc/faq-how-to-develop-film
2. https://pho-tology.com/photo-blog/2018/1/2/developing-film-using-stand-development
3. https://www.digitalrev.com/article/how-to-develop-film-with-the-stand-technique

Old lenses: what adapters would you need to mount a Kodak Vest Pocket lens on an EF-M camera?

Mathieu Stern, the "strange lens guru," recently published this video in which he removed the lens from a Vest Pocket Kodak camera and mounted it on a Sony A7iii. In the description of the video, Stern says only that the lens "was mounted using an m42 adapter (helical) + M42 to C mounting adapter + rubber bands of (one) old bicycle tire."

I am interested in buying one of these old lenses and using it with my Canon EF-M mount camera. Can anyone tell me more specifically what kind of helical adapter would I need? (It is easy to find adapters ranging from M42 lenses to EF-M cameras, so adapting the lens to the M42 mount would effectively answer my question).

How should I adjust the exposure to compensate for the expiration of Kodak ColorPlus 100 (since 2001)?

I shoot the 35mm film for fun.

I received a package of Kodak ColorPlus 100 iso, expiration date 2001. How many stops should I go?

The film remained in good condition (shaded and cooled).

Movie: How can you tell if your Kodak D76 developer can no longer be used?

I do not know a way to know if it is exhausted (maybe it can process small lengths of proof of the film). Rather, it would follow the Kodak guidelines (PDF link), since it is probably more conservative with respect to how much time is preserved and how much film should be processed: the film is much It is more expensive than the developer, and the exposed film is irreplaceable, so losing a bit of development due to insufficient use is much safer than ruining the film.

Movie: How can you tell if your developer Kodak D76 can not be used anymore?

I do not know a way to know if it is exhausted (maybe it can process small lengths of proof of the film). Rather, it would follow the Kodak guidelines (PDF link), since it is probably more conservative with respect to how much time is preserved and how much film should be processed: the film is much It is more expensive than the developer, and the exposed film is irreplaceable, so losing a bit of development due to insufficient use is much safer than ruining the film.

Old cans of Kodak 200 gold film were found

Is there any way to find out if the Kodak 200 Gold cans have been printed (such as the Advantix)? Or maybe, they just did not return the cans, just negative ones?