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raindog308’s Journeys: Secure Your Data With a Dragon at SecureDragon


A long time ago in a galaxy…well, in Florida, there was a company called BackupDragon.  They provided backup VPSes, in a time when these were not yet common.  Today, “storage VPSes” are all over the marketplace but a decade ago, there were few players who specialized in the “high storage, low other resources” offering.

BackupDragon evolved into SecureDragon, a very well-run provider owned by Joe Dougherty (@KuJoe on LET).

Joe has been in the hosting game since forever.  In fact, he used to be an admin on FreeWebHostingTalk (when it still existed – it since has been folded into WHT).  He quite literally wrote the book on free web hosting.  As you might imagine for a book copyright 2010, its information is archaic today but it was an excellent book that talked about many practical aspects of free web hosting.

So when you buy services from SecureDragon, you know you’re benefitting from the experience of someone who’s been around the block.  SecureDragon offers OpenVZ, KVM, backup service, Storage VMs, and cPanel hosting.

What’s neat about SD is that they’ve continued to innovate.  Instead of chasing the bottom of the price ladder, they’ve added features to keep their business sustainable.  Some examples:

  • They have a custom control panel called Wyvern that includes features not seen at other providers.  For example, you can live-migrate your OpenVZ containers to any of their 8 locations.  This panel has been professionally audited for security.
  • They continue to offer a backup service separate from their storage servers.  So if you want space for backups but don’t want to admin a VPS, you can just get a backup account.
  • They’ve continually focused on transparency, including server status, frequent announcements, and published average ticket response times.

I’ve always had a good experience at SD.  They’re generally not the cheapest (though watch LET for occasional deals!) but they always work hard to earn your business.

Now read more to see some pricing!

All prices current as of this posting.

KVM 512

  • 512MB
  • 10GB Disk
  • 1 Core
  • 1000GB Bandwidth
  • 1Gbps Port
  • 1 ipv4
  • /64 ipv6
  • Tampa, FL
  • $3.99/mo
  • (ORDER)

KVM 1GB

  • 1GB
  • 20GB Disk
  • 2 Cores
  • 2000GB Bandwidth
  • 1Gbps Port
  • 1 ipv4
  • /64 ipv6
  • Tampa, FL
  • $4.99/mo
  • (ORDER)

KVM 2GB

  • 2GB
  • 40GB Disk
  • 4 Cores
  • 4000GB Bandwidth
  • 1Gbps Port
  • 1 ipv4
  • /64 ipv6
  • Tampa, FL
  • $9.99/mo
  • (ORDER)

OpenVZ 96MB

  • 96MB RAM
  • 3GB Disk
  • 2 Cores
  • 250GB Bandwidth
  • 1Gbps Port
  • 1 ipv4
  • /64 ipv6
  • 9 US Locations
  • $11.99/year
  • (ORDER)

OpenVZ 512MB

  • 1GB RAM
  • 25GB Disk
  • 4 Cores
  • 2000GB Bandwidth
  • 1Gbps Port
  • 1 ipv4
  • /64 ipv6
  • 9 US Locations
  • $5.99/mo
  • (ORDER)

OpenVZ 2GB

  • 2GB RAM
  • 35GB Disk
  • 4 Cores
  • 3000GB Bandwidth
  • 1Gbps Port
  • 1 ipv4
  • /64 ipv6
  • 9 US Locations
  • $12.99/mo
  • (ORDER)

Related posts:

raindog308’s Journeys: BuyVM, Pony-Powered in the LowEnd Market for 10+ Years!

raindog308

I’m Andrew, techno polymath and long-time LowEndTalk community Moderator. My technical interests include all things Unix, perl, python, shell scripting, and relational database systems. I enjoy writing technical articles here on LowEndBox to help people get more out of their VPSes.

raindog308’s Journeys: BuyVM, Pony-Powered in the LowEnd Market for 10+ Years!


Most of the companies appearing on LowEndBox submit offers requesting publication.  From time to time, we bring you other companies that our staff has discovered over the years.  Our goal is to provide a full range of options for you to consider in the vast LowEnd marketplace.  Enjoy!

Remember the first few Apple iPhones?  People stood in line – sometimes all night – outside Apple stores in order to be one of the first to lay their hands on them.  Believe it or not, there was a time when 128MB OpenVZ VMs were the same.

Ten years ago, if you wanted a 128 from BuyVM, you had to get up at 2am and wait until Fran (BuyVM’s owner, Francisco Dias) released stock.  There were web sites tracking BuyVM stock and people would wait to pounce on on a free server.

The $15/year 128MB was an early BuyVM innovation.  They also specialized in storage servers before they were popular.  Since their beginning, they’ve added innovations regularly, including

  • DDoS protection in the LowEnd market.  More common now, but it wasn’t when they started.  Many people offering DDoS-protected VPS today are just OVH resellers, but BuyVM has their own contracted DDoS protection.
  • Block storage volumes (“slabs” in their parlance)
  • Anycast VPSes
  • Offloaded SQL.  This was a cool add-on which allowed you to purchase a modest VPS (such as one of their 128s) and then offload your SQL to a much beefier dedicated SQL box.  They still offer this service for $1/mo.
  • Custom control panel.  Their panel – called Stallion – is completely home-developed, giving them a platform to continue innovating.

The company has had hiccups over the years, but has always responded well.  A large power failure in Las Vegas once knocked a lot of VMs offline but the company responded with full transparency is a case study in how to handle such issues.  There’s been some drama over BuyVM’s commitment to free speech – usually when someone in the mainstream media discovers they’re hosting something that particular media source doesn’t like (or BuyVM’s TOR Exit-friendly policies cause people to jump to wrong conclusions).  But these minor problems aside, they’ve been a solid provider for more than a decade.

With service in Las Vegas (NV), New York (NY), and Luxembourg, BuyVM continues to grow and move from strength to strength.  And the odds are to get a VM, you won’t need to get up at 2am to wait in line!

Now read more to see some offers!

Pricing current as of the date of this post.

Slice 512

  • 1 Core @ 3.50+ GHz
  • Fair Share CPU Usage
  • 512 MB Memory
  • 10 GB SSD Storage
  • Unmetered Bandwidth
  • 1 IPv4 Address
  • $2.00 per month
  • (ORDER)

Slice 1024

  • 1 Core @ 3.50+ GHz
  • Fair Share CPU Usage
  • 1024 MB Memory
  • 20 GB SSD Storage
  • Unmetered Bandwidth
  • 1 IPv4 Address
  • $3.50 per month
  • (ORDER)

Slice 2048

  • 1 Core @ 3.50+ GHz
  • Fair Share CPU Usage
  • 2048 MB Memory
  • 40 GB SSD Storage
  • Unmetered Bandwidth
  • 1 IPv4 Address
  • $7.00 per month
  • (ORDER)

Slice 4096

  • 1 Core @ 3.50+ GHz
  • Dedicated CPU Usage
  • 4096 MB Memory
  • 80 GB SSD Storage
  • Unmetered Bandwidth
  • 1 IPv4 Address
  • $15.00 per month
  • (ORDER)

All plans include a free DirectAdmin license!

See their Wiki for more information on available addons!

raindog308

I’m Andrew, techno polymath and long-time LowEndTalk community Moderator. My technical interests include all things Unix, perl, python, shell scripting, and relational database systems. I enjoy writing technical articles here on LowEndBox to help people get more out of their VPSes.

national rail – How to find the best-priced UK train ticket combos for not-quite-round trip journeys?

I do a lot of walking and hiking in the UK. Frequently, I need to find the best combination of tickets that will get me to the start of the walk and then bring me home. This is simple if the walk starts and ends on the same train line, but gets tricky otherwise.

For example, if I start at Vauxhall, and I wanted to walk from Salfords to Chilworth, I think it’s Contactless from Vauxhall to Salfords, and a single Chilworth to Vauxhall.

If I wanted to walk from Chilworth to Brookwood, it seems like the cheapest combination would be a return ticket from Vauxhall to Chilworth and a single from Brookwood to Woking.

I found these by painstaking trial and error, and there must be a better way to search for these in general. Do any of the “split ticket” search engines have this as an option? If I instead of Chilworth to Brookwood, I wanted to walk all the way to Sunningdale, I don’t think that Sunningdale to Weybridge would cover me for the return trip, but what would the best combination be, and how to find these in general?