dnd 5e: do simultaneous events get hit and take damage?

I have found this Q / A ("Does Armor of Agathys damage take place before or after a character receives damage from a hitting attack?") And also this Q / A ("What happens if a creature dies between their attack? and damage rolls "), both use the idea of ​​being hit by an attack and take damage from an attack happen at different times.


An example of why this is important is when a characteristic is a reaction when hit by an attack:

the Agathys armor spell states:

If a creature hits you with a melee attack As long as you have these hit points, the creature takes 5 cold damage.

This effect does not require any reaction, it just happens simultaneously with the blow.

The characteristic of the Sun Shield of the Sun Soul Monk says:

If a creature hits you with a melee attack while this light shines, you can use your reaction to do radiant damage to the creature.

This requires your reaction, and we know that reactions (typically) occur after their triggers as supported by this P / R ("Do the reactions interrupt your triggers or not?") For the Sun Shield effect to occur after being hit.

But it is still unclear to me if you can use this reaction before taking to damage.

In other words: do simultaneous events get hit and take damage?
If so, the reaction would occur after the coup and, therefore, after damage.
If not, then the reaction would occur after the coup but before damage.

dnd 5e: Does a reaction occur when hit before or after taking damage?

I have found this Q / A ("Does Armor of Agathys damage take place before or after a character receives damage from a hitting attack?") And also this Q / A ("What happens if a creature dies between their attack? and damage rolls "), both use the idea of ​​being hit by an attack and take damage from an attack happen at different times.
This may not be the case, and being hit by an attack and taking damage are, in fact, simultaneous events, if so, this would also answer my question.

the Agathys armor spell states:

If a creature hits you with a melee attack As long as you have these hit points, the creature takes 5 cold damage.

Notably Agathys armor It doesn't require any kind of reaction, it just happens simultaneously with the blow.
However, there are features, such as the Sun Shield of the Sun Soul Monk, which are reactions to be hit and not things that It only happens when it hits.

The characteristic of the Sun Shield of the Sun Soul Monk says:

If a creature hits you with a melee attack while this light shines, you can use your reaction to do radiant damage to the creature.

The reactions (usually) occur after activation as supported by this question / answer ("Do the reactions interrupt your activations or not?"), So I wonder this question:

Do reactions that trigger when you are hit by an attack occur before or after taking damage?

dnd 5e: do actions with multiple rolls to hit with the help provided gain advantage in all rolls?

Your question: Do actions with multiple rolls to hit with the help provided gain advantage in all rolls?

The Help action has the following description:

Alternatively, you can help a friendly creature attack a creature 5 feet from you. Pretend, distract the target or, in some other way, form a team to make your ally's attack more effective. If your ally attacks the target before your next turn, the first attack roll is made with advantage.

This means, as already said, that a single Helper can only give advantage to the first attack roll.

However, if I had a number of assistants, it is possible that the DM allows everyone to have an action prepared to help using the following type of description: "if they make an attack, then I help them attack" or "if they make two attacks Then I help them attack "etc.

A prepared action interrupts, so they would come into play after the attack that triggered the action but before the next attack. So, the rule of the description of the Help action:

If your ally attacks the target before your next turn, the first attack roll is made with advantage.

would apply to your first attack roll after Help action is taken. You will get as many rolls in advantage as helpers who have properly ordered their actions prepared to help.

Where a DM can reject this is if they feel that an attack action cannot be interrupted "mid-attack." However, an attacker can move between attacks, so it is quite clear that each attack is a separate thing and it would also be possible to have a prepared action based, for example, on launching a Wind Wall if an enemy uses a ranged weapon as one of his multiple attacks and that would interrupt, so I don't see a problem here.

dnd 5e: How many hit points does the Iron Defender of the Battle Smith architect have?

The interpretation of equations like this is not defined by the rules of the game, so we use the meaning in English. Unfortunately, English (and most other AFAIK languages) is not very good at it, which is a great reason to use symbolic mathematics. As a good rule; Take the simplest reading while scanning. Is all:

$$ 5 times text {Level} + text {Your Int} + text {Defender & # 39; s Con} $$

that for anyone who is not completely comfortable with the order of operations is the same

$$ (5 times text {Level}) + text {Your Int} + text {Defender & # 39; s With} $$

If it were to mean

$$ 5 times ( text {Level} + text {Your Int} + text {Defender & # 39; s Con}) $$

It should (in my opinion) be worded as (italic to emphasize change):

equal to five times the sum of your level in this class + your Intelligence modifier + the Iron Defender Constitution modifier

As additional support, the same problem of having such equations in the D&D rules has appeared for Arcane Ward, where lead designer Jeremy Crawford has intervened on twitter (It is not an official decision, but it gives what is the intended meaning) with the statement that

The room has hit points equal to twice your wizard level + your Intelligence modifier.

It should read as:

Your maximum hit point is equal to your Intelligence modifier plus double your assistant level.

Meaning to be read as

$$ (2 times text {Level}) + text {Int} $$

similar to the previous one.

Mathematics: how do I launch a ballistic projectile to hit a moving target, given: position and launch angle, position and velocity of the target?

I assume that its gravity acts on the vertical axis and that its launch angle is an altitude (measured vertically from the horizon, so 0 ° means to shoot horizontally and 90 ° means to shoot upwards). Our turret can still turn on the azimuth (from side to side) to follow the target and intercept it if it moves laterally.

The first thing we will do is take the absolute objective position $ vec p_T $ and launch position $ vec p_L $ build a relative target position vector $ vec r $, and its projection in the horizontal plane $ vec r_h $ and vertical axis $ r_v $:

$$ begin {align}
vec r & = vec p_T – vec p_L \
r_v & = vec r cdot vec {top} \
vec r_h & = vec r – r_v vec {top}
end {align} $$

This allows us to take the throwing position directly out of the equation. We can apply the second and third steps to the target velocity vector $ vec v $ divide it into a horizontal vector $ vec v_h $ and a vertical component $ v_v $.

Now, if we want to reach the goal at an initially unknown moment $ t $ seconds after launch, we will have to cover the horizontal offset $ vec r_h + vec v_h t $ straight in time $ t $. So, the horizontal component of our launch speed $ vec l_h $ is:

$$ vec l_h = frac { vec r_h + vec v_h t} t $$

Given our desired launch angle $ theta $, we know that the relationship between horizontal and vertical launch speeds is:

$$ begin {align}
tan theta & = frac {l_v} { | vec l_h |} \
tan theta cdot | vec l_h | & = l_v \
tan ^ 2 theta cdot l_h ^ 2 & = l_v ^ 2 \
tan ^ 2 theta left ( frac { vec r_h + vec v_h t} t right) ^ 2 & = l_v ^ 2 \
tan ^ 2 theta left ( frac {r_h ^ 2} {t ^ 2} + 2 frac { vec r_h cdot vec v_h} t + v_h ^ 2 right) & = l_v ^ 2
end {align} $$

Now we want to know if that vertical launch speed will take us to the height of our goal at the end of the arc at the moment $ t $:

$$ begin {align}
l_v t – frac g 2 t ^ 2 & = r_v \
l_v & = frac {r_v} t + frac g 2 t \
l_v ^ 2 & = frac {r_v ^ 2} {t ^ 2} + r_v g + frac {g ^ 2} 4 t ^ 2 \
tan ^ 2 theta left ( frac {r_h ^ 2} {t ^ 2} + 2 frac { vec r_h cdot vec v_h} t + v_h ^ 2 right) & = frac {r_v ^ 2} {t ^ 2} + r_v g + frac {g ^ 2} 4 t ^ 2 \
tan ^ 2 theta left (r_h ^ 2 + 2 vec r_h cdot vec v_h t + v_h ^ 2 t ^ 2 right) & = r_v ^ 2 + r_v gt ^ 2 + frac {g ^ 2 } 4 t ^ 4 \
t ^ 4 left ( frac {g ^ 2} 4 right)
+ t ^ 2 left (r_v g – left ( tan theta right) ^ 2 v_h ^ 2 right)
– t left (2 left ( tan theta right) ^ 2 vec r_h cdot vec v_h right)
– left ( tan theta right) ^ 2 r_h ^ 2
& = 0
end {align} $$

We now have a quantum equation in a variable with known real number coefficients. As described in this answer, you can apply your favorite quantum resolution routine (there is an example in the comments) to find potential values ​​of $ t $ that satisfy the equation In general, there could be up to four solutions. We are only looking for those who are …

  • real numbers (zero imaginary component)
  • greater than zero (negative values ​​correspond to shots objective could have thrown at we to hit us at our launch angle at time 0)

If you have multiple candidate solutions that meet those criteria, you can freely choose between them. Generally, the lower the time value $ t $ The more shallow the arch, but also less time has the goal to change course and dodge. Higher $ t $ The solutions generally correspond to higher arcs (we spend more time flying up and down through the air), giving the target more time to evade.

With the chosen time $ t $ In your hand, you can substitute it in the previous equations to find your horizontal and vertical launch speed components, and combine them into the final speed.

[ Family ] Open question: Did I hit my dad and feel horrible?

I have never hit my father, but I did it today and I feel very bad. I don't even remember what happened exactly because it was so trivial, but my father asked me to do something and I got angry because he was pressing me and he pressed me. He hit me with his sock, I activated it and kicked him (he was in a bad mood), he was surprised, my mom was also there and told me not to do it in a serious tone and then they left. But my father is super old and he has had leg problems and has given me luck, I kicked him in the leg that hurt me and I heard him talk to my mother about his leg hurting again (he was better this morning ) and guilt just kills me. I tried to face him for that, but he just says he doesn't want to talk about it and I don't know what to do, there's an awkward tension of & # 39; let's not talk & # 39 ;, so I just stay in my room for now. . He doesn't even hit me, he just screams, is that why this time I got so active that he? What do I do now … (tagsToTranslate) yahoo (t) answer (t) questions (t) Family and relationships (t) Family

[ Movies ] Open question: Sylvester Stallone has hit three black men and a communist in the "Rocky" movies. Is it an apology in order?

[Movies] Open question: Sylvester Stallone has hit three black men and a communist in the "Rocky" movies. Is it an apology in order? .

I hit 1K in the mixer!

A couple of days before my birthday I reached 1,000 followers on Mixer.com :]

dnd 5e: What rules turn any attack that hits a certain target into a critical hit?

Paralyzed and unconscious produce automatic crits.

However, with the caveat that you have to be within short range.

From the players manual.

Page 291

Paralyzed

A paralyzed creature is incapacitated (see the condition) and cannot move or speak. • The creature automatically fails the throws of salvation Strength and Dexterity. • Attack rolls against the creature have an advantage. • Any attack that hits the creature is a critical hit if the attacker is 5 feet from the creature..

Page 292

Unconscious

• An unconscious creature is incapacitated (see the condition), cannot move or speak, and is not aware of its surroundings. • The creature drops everything it has and falls prone. • The creature automatically fails the throws of salvation Strength and Dexterity. • Attack rolls against the creature have an advantage. • Any attack that hits the creature is a critical hit if the attacker is 5 feet from the creature.

dnd 5e – Does a creature in flight hit by the spell Hurry when the spell ends?

The final prayer of the spell Prisa says:

When the spell ends, the target. can not move or take Actions until after his next turn, while a wave of lethargy sweeps him. (PBH p 250)

If a creature like a wyvern, pegasus, griffon, etc. it is flying while hurried on (ie, under the effect of the Haste spell), does it fall when the spell Haste ends because at that moment the affected creature "can not move"?

A superficial reading of the paragraph under Movement of flight in the PHB seems to suggest that it would fall:

If a flying creature is knocked down, its speed is reduced to 0, or if not Deprived of the ability to move, the creature falls, unless you have the ability to float or it is held high by magic, as by the spell of the fly. (PHB page 191)

But I'm not sure that he has not lost some subtle nuances in the writing of the rules that would argue otherwise.

The Compendium of wise advice 2019 has this paragraph:

Can a flying creature without the floating feature stay in one place while it is in the air, or does it need to move each round? A steering wheel that lacks the floating feature. can Hold high without moving each round.

The language in the description of the spell of Prisa does not impose any formal condition (as Disabled, Stunnedor Restrained), nor does it say that the creature speed It is reduced to 0 feet. So I wonder if the words "can not move" in this context are enough to establish that a creature in flight must begin to fall immediately (as a wave of lethargy sweeps over it) or if there are reasonable grounds to argue that according to RAW or RAI it can remain high without "moving".