dnd 5e – How much fire damage does igniting Grease deal?

I think there’s only one reasonable interpretation of “spells only do what they say they do” in this case. The idea that this means that the grease can’t be ignited puts a weird privilege on the property “flammable”. In the real world, pretty much most things can be lit aflame, and grease is usually one of them.

Saying “the grease spell doesn’t say the substance is flammable, so it is fireproof” is like saying “wall of stone doesn’t say that the wall is visible, only that it’s solid, so you can’t see it”. That’s…. a route to madness. We use a common sense, English language interpretation of what “stone” is, and the same should apply to “grease”.

Now, it may be that “flammable” is special, and there is a non-written rule that this is a property that nothing has unless otherwise stated. But, that seems to be exactly what Crawford is cautioning about in this tweet“There aren’t secret rules.” There definitely isn’t a written rule about this.

So, what’s the reasonable interpretation? The grease may indeed be flammable, but it’s not so specially flammable as to cause significant extra fire damage — if it were, it would say so. I’d rule that it either burns in a flash that does no damage, or minimal damage like the non-magical damage from a lit torch as a weapon — save or take 1 point of fire damage.

dnd 5e – Grease spell: Can a creature with 10 strength or more jump over the greased area?

Strict RAW, with STR 10, you cover only 10′, not 10′ + one step. If you keep just jumping, you advance 10′ per jump, which includes the space taken by your feet.

When you make a long jump, you cover a number of feet up to your Strength score if you move at least 10 feet on foot immediately before the jump.

So you’d have to either jump from or land at the greasy area, and while you might avoid the difficult terrain (because you don’t actually spend movement walking in the grease), you’d at least need to make a DEX saving throw. With this reading, you’d need 1 (or even 2, one at both sides) extra foot, in other words STR 11 (or 12), to avoid the grease completely by jumping.

RAI, hard to say. The rule could be interpreted meaning, you can jump past an obstacle of that many feet, and a DM could reasonably rule it that way. The argument for this interpretation is, that the rules don’t say how many extra feet of jump distance you need to get over an obstacle like this, so the reasonable ruling is, that no extra feet are needed.

dnd 5e – Can you use a large creature’s dead body as a means to walk over a grease spell so that you are unaffected by that spell?

Here’s the spell description:

Slick grease covers the ground in a 10-foot square centered on a point within range and turns it into difficult terrain for the duration.

When the grease appears, each creature standing in its area must succeed on a Dexterity saving throw or fall prone. A creature that enters the area or ends its turn there must also succeed on a Dexterity saving throw or fall prone.

There is no rule “grease spell effect is negated when a large creature is lying upon” in any official source book. We on the internet can only tell you that spells do based on their description only, because we are not DMing your game. We cannot change or expand upon the rules and say “this is part of how the spell works”. We do not have that authority; the DM of the game does, and we aren’t that.

The Grease spell covers 10-foot square, and a large creature does not cover 10-foot square:

A creature’s space is the area in feet that it effectively controls in combat, not an expression of its physical dimensions. (PHB p. 191)

You can try to walk over it, but the result will depend on the situation — how exactly the creature is lying, what body does that creature have, et cetera. This is the DMs job to adjudicate such things, so it becomes exactly the “ask your DM” type of question.

One thing we can say though — there is no “fluff” ignorable text in that description. It says “slick grease covers the ground”, therefore this slick grease is the exact reason why a walking creature “must succeed on a Dexterity saving throw or fall prone”. If you completely cover the grease with something big and heavy enough to be a sound surface, it probably negates the spell effect (but still, ask your DM).

dnd 5e – Is this improved Grease spell balanced?

Grease is a very underwhelming spell as it currently stands due to its size and shape (10 ft square) and because the effect is easily overcome. I think this could be a great low level control spell that would still be useful even at higher levels, but it needs some changing. Control spells at 1st level that effect multiple targets typically have an additional or stronger effect: Earth Tremor deals damage, Entangle restrains the target instead of keeping them prone, among other spells having similar improved effects. See below for my alternative Grease spell.

Grease
1st level conjuration

Casting Time: 1 action
Range: 60 feet
Components: V S M (A bit of pork rind or butter)
Duration: 1 minute
Classes: Wizard

Slick grease covers the ground in and turns it into difficult terrain for the duration. You make a line up to 5 feet wide, and 30 feet long; alternatively, you can make a square up to 15 feet across.
When the grease appears, each creature standing in its area must succeed on a Dexterity saving throw or fall prone. A creature that enters the area, stands up from prone while in the area, or ends its turn there must also succeed on a Dexterity saving throw or fall prone.

The first change her is the spells area of effect. By changing the spell to be a line, this gives the caster the option to force enemies to cross its area; they may not be in the grease for as long, but they are much more likely to spend time in it. Increasing the size of the spell to 15 feet makes it to a creature moving through the terrain with average movement (30 feet) will have to spend all there movement to get from one side to the other.
The second change adds standing up from prone requiring a dexterity saving throw. This makes it much more difficult to overcome the prone feature of the spell, and may mean the effected creature needs to crawl out of the area in order to end its effect.

An additional change I considered, but probably would be too powerful for the spell being 1st level, was the grease being flammable. this is something that a lot of players ask for and DMs I’ve played with typically allow. Here’s my interpretation of how the effects would look:

A creature that falls prone in the spells area is soaked in grease: this makes the creature vulnerable to the next fire damage they take before the spell ends, unless they are already resistant or immune, in which case this has no effect. Any fire damage that is dealt to the grease area or a creature soaked in grease while still within the area causes the entire area to erupt in flame, cancelling out the prone effects of the spell. Any creature in the area must make a dexterity saving throw, taking 1d6 fire damage on a failure. The grease is completely burned up in 1 round.

I think this addition is a bit more complex than most things in 5e, and likely too strong for 1st level. The vulnerability to fire damage would be close to everyone in the area of the spell, which is why the damage is so small. I think boosting the spell to 2nd level be appropriate, and adding concentration to the spells duration.

dnd 5e – Can I cast the Grease spell on ropes to make people who climb on them fall?

The rules for the spell establish that the ground is covered by a slippery substance and confers Saving Throws against falls prone to creatures in the area. It says nothing about being applied to objects or, according to your example, the ropes used to climb, nor the fact of being prone to be hit has an effect on creatures that cling to a rope.

Slippery fat covers the ground in a 10-foot square centered on a point within the range and makes it difficult terrain for the duration.

When fat appears, every creature in your area must succeed in a Dexterity save roll or a prone fall. A creature that enters the area or ends its turn there must also succeed in a Dexterity save roll or a prone fall.

Grease, Player Manual, p. 246

Personally, as DM, I don't think I would approve of simply saying "nothing happens." This is an intelligent use of a spell in a way that the rules are not designed to adapt, so I think it is appropriate to allow it to have some kind of effect. In this context, it is likely to allow 10 & # 39; of rope to be covered with grease, and for creatures attempting to climb through it, it would force them to make Skillful Saving Sparks so that they remain attached to the rope.

But that is ultimately a DM call, and there is no distortion of the rules as written to allow this type of use.

[ Hamburg ] Open question: True or false: do you have 6 packages ……. under layers and layers of grease?

[ Hamburg ] Open question: True or false: do you have 6 packages ……. under layers and layers of grease? .

dnd 5e – How many gallons of mayonnaise do you need to pour into the gound to replicate the Grease spell?

*(May can not allow it)

Surprisingly, the spell does not say what kind of equivalence based on the seasoning would be necessary to achieve the same effect (or even if it could). Therefore, this type of situation would be entirely from your DM.

It is worth noting that there would be almost no way to adjudicate this based on knowledge of the real world. The spell effect is not related to the amount of oil in the ground, it is a spell effect. And even if it was related, there is no way to know how much May might even try to replicate the effect.

In the end, it is unlikely to matter in any case, except in the situation where this becomes a common occurrence, so that it is beating the spellcasting competition (or a related skill). In which case, since it adversely affects fun at the table, the DM must adjust accordingly.

As someone who has tried (as DM) and has caused (as a player) hijinks (May-hem?) Based on extravagant Maya, the best method is to go with any sound that is fun at that time and keep it consistent unless the problem arisesone


1 – Tip: if you do not want scams based on materials, do not give your player a jar of alchemy. It's the first thing that every player I've given one has done with this and really the only way to make it applicable to most campaigns.

dnd 5e – What is the DC effect of a Grease effect implemented by the Oil of Slipperiness?

Slip oil states:

Alternatively, the oil can be poured into the soil as an action, where it covers a 10-foot square, doubling the effect of the grease spell in that area for 8 hours.

The Fat spell states:

The slippery grease covers the floor in a 10-foot square centered on a point within the range and makes it a difficult terrain for duration. When the fat appears, each creature in its area must succeed in a Dexterity saving throw or in a prone fall. A creature that enters the area or ends its turn there must also be successful in a Dexterity saving throw or in a prone fall.

What is the DC spell save of a grease placed in its place by a slip oil?