dnd 5e: What is the extent of a drunken monk's redirect attack?

The sixth level Tipsy balancing characteristic of the states of Drunken Master (emphasis mine):

When a creature misses you with a melee attack roll, you can spend 1 ki as a reaction to make that attack hit a creature of your choice, other than the attacker, that you can see less than 5 feet from you.

Anyone who chooses to attack with their reaction must be within five feet of you (and should be able to see them).

exploit: To what extent is a GUI modifiable with little effort, assuming superuser access?

Assuming that through an exploit you get superuser access to a machine and want to modify the running applications in a subtle way and with the least effort, to what extent is a GUI modifiable?

An example would be to modify a button click to do what you want instead of your default behavior. Another example would be to put an additional button that says "log in using your bank account" and take your credentials.

I specified "under effort" because, of course, you can create another application that looks like the original, except for your changes, but that is a great effort.

I know that the web is quite vulnerable to such modifications (if the user installs a malicious browser extension, that would be the equivalent "superuser access" in that world), and I would like to know how far the software GUI is. vulnerable.

Attack – To what extent does asymmetric cryptography secure bitcoin transactions?

Without asymmetric cryptography, there would be no asymmetry of information: in other words, everyone knows exactly as much as the others. If everyone knows the same thing, there is no way to distinguish a legitimate sender from an evil one.

More specifically, if a symmetric construction such as an HMAC were used to authenticate a transaction, the miners would learn the key to legitimate spending transactions and could, instead, extract a transaction (indistinguishable and also legal) that steals the coins.

dnd 5e – To what extent could a magician combine skills to learn to imitate unknown spells?

Seeking how to give a rogue that I am building a kind of eidetic memory, I found many publications throughout the network about the use of the fabulous Keen Mind as a way for wizards to deny having to worry about that in battle. Having not understood Keen Mind's definition in this way, he made me see the exploits in a new way to see how they could be used.

Sharp mind:

[…] You can remember with precision anything that you have seen or heard inside.
last month

Observer:

[…]If you can see the mouth of a creature while it is speaking a language
you understand, you can interpret what you are saying by reading your
lips.

Actor:

[…]You can imitate the speech of another person or the sounds made by
other creatures. You must have listened to the person speaking, or heard
The creature makes the sound, for at least 1 minute. A successful wisdom
(Insight) check challenged by your Charisma (Deception) check allows a
Listener to determine that the effect is false.

Since the spells are divided into three aspects, Verbal, Stomatics and Material, where the verbal aspect is more of the sound than what is said, Could the three feats listed above be combined to give a magician the ability to replicate any spell he witnesses?

I realize that the spells are more complex, so the magician would have to have the spell slots available, an arcane focus to take care of the material part (limited by the conditions of an arcane focus) and he would have to have some idea of how that the spell caster can sound in advance (you can do this by asking the Magic Guild to show your favorite spells and applying what you learned to similar races / classes), but in general, do I understand correctly how a magician could use these skills? In some way, use the enemy's abilities against them?

legal – To what extent can one game legally resemble another?

Foreword: Everything related to the laws will always be in a gray area, because the outcome of the case ultimately comes from a handful of people.

Others have pointed out that the code of the game and the assets are subject to the copyright law and that the names of the products, companies, etc. they are under the law of registered trademarks.
However, although others have pointed out that you can not protect the mechanics of the game, this is not 100% true.

Let's look at the legal history of Tetris, a game often cloned by new game developers.

In mid-2006, and at the end of 1997, the TTC legal counsel sent cease and desist letters to the websites on the basis of Tetris-type games that infringed the trademark, commercial image and / or copyright of "Tetris". ", and / or the copyright. Around 2009, TTC and Tetris Holding LLC filed legal actions against BioSocia, Inc. because the game "Blockles" of BioSocia infringed the property rights of TTC and Tetris Holding LLC. On September 10, 2009, the legal case against BioSocia was resolved, and BioSocia agreed to stop making the game "Blockles" available to the public. In May 2010, TTC's legal counsel sent cease and desist letters to Google insisting that 35 Tetris clones be removed from the Android Market. A judge of the US District Court UU It ruled in June 2012 that the clone Tetris "Mino" of Xio Interactive infringed the copyright of the Tetris Company by replicating elements such as the dimensions of the playing field and the shapes of the blocks.

Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tetris#The_Tetris_Company

Mino vs Tetris

Tetris and Mino

So, the mechanical games are copyrighted? The answer, as with many legal problems, is perhaps.

Read more about Mino vs. Tetris here.

dnd 5e: To what extent does the incorporation of the "Card Draw Initiative" system by Savage Worlds affect the game in 5e?

In Savage Worlds, the Initiative is determined using a deck of 54 cards (the standard deck of 52 cards, including the Jokers). Each player and enemy receives a card (or a group of enemies, as all the goblins receive a card, the orcs receive another card, etc.). Ace goes first, King second, etc., up to 2 last. At the end of each round, the cards are discarded and a new card game is drawn. This means that, with each round, the possibility of stealing a Joker increases.

If a Joker is stolen, that player / enemy can go whenever he wants; this can be reactionary (although it should not be used in place of a player's reaction); in response to an attack made, or to wait for an opening made by another player, etc. Also, all the rolls that make that round are awarded +2 (attack rolls, skill checks, damage rolls, etc.). At the end of this round, when a Joker is drawn, all cards are shuffled back into the deck.

Players can also gain skills that can modify their draw (for example, their minimum Initiative is 5 cards drawn until they get a card of 5 or higher), however I will omit this in this question, since that opens up a lot of different possibilities.

As mentioned in the comments, to avoid penalizing characters with high Dex modifiers, this can be incorporated into the system. E.g. A player who receives a "2", adds his initiative bonus (+2), so his total is 4.

I have heard of systems that use a Static Initiative system, working flat Dex, instead of using a roll, and others that do restart the Initiative in each round, to create a more variable meeting system.

How much would this Card Initiative system affect the game instead of the standard 5e Initiative system?

To what extent can I customize a demiplane?

For example, let's say I want to launch demiplano and make it zero gravity.
I can do this? The rules say nothing about the demiplanothe gravity
So this seems like it could be valid but I'm not sure.

dnd 5e: To what extent does the mechanics affect the narrative / role play?

I want to share something that happened a few weeks ago, and I still wonder.

There were two events:

At the first time, in a dungeon, we found several creatures similar to an imp in a room with a red blood floor, poisonous on contact. We did not know anything but they were imbeciles. Suddenly, I remember that my cleric secret of the XGtE (that text to give flavor to the characters) was "An imp gives you advice, you try to ignore the creature, but sometimes its advice is useful". So I asked my DM if I could ask him for help, and my imp told us that these creatures were not imbeciles, they oozed out. That saved us a lot of time.

The second time, we won a fight in a coliseum and are rewarded as with a magical item. Since it was my first hammer +1, I wanted to make it special. I am a forge cleric, with a history of clan creator, who gives me a chisel. So I decided to inscribe my deity's emblem on it to show my devotion, even when it would take me a full hour. That night we fought again in the coliseum and I lost the saving throw of the Wisdom of an enemy. I send Spell, releasing my hammer and shield. As I could not afford to spend a complete action to equip the shield again, I decided to equip only the hammer, and then my DM said, "You lose your shield, which was your sacred symbol." Normally, you could not cast spells with a material component, but A few hours ago you asked me to inscribe the symbol of your god on the weapon, so now that hammer also functions as a sacred symbol. " That was great.

Both things do not exist in the rules. There is no rule about how to make a sacred symbol, how to use a chisel, or the mechanical rules of each trait that a character can have, such as a secret imp that gives you advice. All that was improvised by the DM, so my question is: To what extent does narrative, role play or just flavor text affect the mechanics of D & D 5e? D & D 5e (DMG?) Has a rule about ruling on the fly Those things? How can a DM know if he is exceeding the limits or simply applies what the books can not say because that would take too many pages to write?

For example, using the hammer as a sacred symbol does not affect the rules much (I think) because I will continue using the shield, I want that CA bonus. But if instead of inscribing a sacred symbol on a hammer, an enchanted magic sword will encrust the gem of your wand to a short sword, and then use two weapons that fight with another short sword while making a sword sword would be quite powerful. that?). So there are limits on what you can and can not afford. I want to know about that.

The question may be in the limit of a style of quality control, if you think I passed it and this is too general or too broad, just let me know in the comments and I will delete it as soon as you read the comment.

legal – To what extent can one game legally resemble another?

Foreword: Everything related to the laws will always be in a gray area, because the outcome of the case ultimately comes from a handful of people.

Others have pointed out that the code and the assets of the game are under the copyright law and that the names of the products, companies, etc. they are under the law of registered trademarks.
However, although others have pointed out that you can not protect the mechanics of the game, this is not 100% true.

Let's look at the legal history of Tetris, a game often cloned by new game developers.

In mid-2006 and at the end of 1997, the TTC legal counsel sent cease and desist letters to the websites based on Tetris-type games that infringe the trademark, commercial image and / or copyright of "Tetris" , and / or "copyright". Around 2009, TTC and Tetris Holding LLC filed legal actions against BioSocia, Inc. because the game "Blockles" of BioSocia infringed the property rights of TTC and Tetris Holding LLC. On September 10, 2009, the legal case against BioSocia was resolved, and BioSocia agreed to stop making the game "Blockles" available to the public. In May 2010, TTC's legal counsel sent cease and desist letters to Google insisting that 35 Tetris clones be removed from the Android Market. A judge of the US District Court UU It ruled in June 2012 that the clone Tetris "Mino" of Xio Interactive infringed the copyright of the Tetris Company by replicating elements such as the dimensions of the playing field and the shapes of the blocks.

Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tetris#The_Tetris_Company

Mino vs Tetris

Tetris and Mino

So, the mechanical games are copyrighted? The answer, as with many legal issues, is perhaps.

Read more about Mino vs. Tetris here.

readability: to what extent is the blank text on a medium to light gray background objectively a bad practice?

I made the mistake of openly criticizing a web page because they asked me for an opinion. I ruled negatively. To what extent is the designer guilty of my unfavorable criticism?

Legibility judged objectively?

Here intrinsic and external factors intervene, such as monitors and eyes.

The small text, from 8 to 10px, white, in a solid tone of gray, which is somewhere between 10 and 35%, still made me fall a "star" … probably because the LCD helped me. The viewing angle of the screen, the density of pixels, maybe even the reflection of the screen could have influenced me. However, am I to blame or is this supposed to be avoided?

Since I have a slight astigmatism, I should not appreciate small sources that are too thin or light. But actually I use this configuration at this time for my desktop environment, with supbixel processing enabled as a necessity to render the font correctly, it is very thin. I'm not blind

Is it sustainable that one should not have to weigh such external factors, if one adheres to good practices, as a greater contrast between the text and the fund?

There was also no real need to choose such a clear gray. What finally gave me the impression of being careless, while the author could have tried to keep things warm and cozy with his choice of colors.

Relevance issues

The thing is that the user is not reading a poem with this configuration. I'm talking about the menu items that will only be read really until the user learns instinctively in the third word of the row.

Personally, I think readability is important. But good practices are not rules and I can not penalize the author because he violated Article X. Is this still somehow objectively A misstep from a UX perspective or is it rather that I was prone to simply "finding fault" subjectively, frustrated by not being able to read some words at a glance? To what extent is the white text on a light gray background objectively a bad practice?

Bonus question in the same line:

This menu was also hidden unnecessarily from the view, until it was invoked by a click. This superfluity made me fall another star, since it gets in the way of efficient interaction. Except, it's just an additional click. However, making a furore in the dynamics for the sake of having dynamics can be done without getting in the way.

The same question. Did I hold a valid resentment? Should the author get it or rather be offended?