dnd 5e – If I used Wish to become immune to being seen through Truesight and being in an area of ​​magical darkness, can a creature see me with Truesight?

As the title says, does being in an area of ​​magical darkness, while being immune to detection through truth (not the spell, but the monster's ability) leave me invisible to a creature that has the truth?

On the one hand, the answer could be yes. I am now undetectable by the truth, and the truth is what allows the creature to see me.

On the other hand, the answer could be no. Truesight allows the creature to see through magical darkness and I am not actually invisible.

What is the answer that has the most adherence to the rules as they are written? Or is this a gray area in the rules?

dnd 5e: Does the creature in room 27 of White Plume Mountain use its magic items?

Yes. It is a reasonable assumption.

DMG p 138

Smart monsters often use magic items in their possession, while
others may hide them to make sure they are not lost or stolen.
For example, if a tribe of goblins has a longsword + l and an alchemy
jug in his treasure, the warlord of the tribe could wield the sword,
while the jar is kept in a safe place.

Too.

Ogre Magi or Oni, as they are now called, are the most intelligent and magical Asian counterpart of the stupid legendary western ogre.

It is also reasonable to assume that you do not use the other item in your possession because:

He was assigned to protect him or he might know what it really is and he doesn't know how many souls he would reasonably have access to and he doesn't want to waste his life doing it.

As for the RC tuning, I have two thoughts about it.

  1. Most of the modules they translated from previous editions were essentially copy / paste without much thought as to whether the old mechanics and challenges translated well in the new edition.

  2. Those two elements in particular don't really increase hardness that much in my opinion. Maybe by 1. If the last element had different things within maybe higher.

dnd 5e: Is a creature in the area of ​​a Water Wall spell trapped in ice when hit by the Ray of Frost cantrip?

This is a great combination! The rules for casting two spells with one bonus action and one action simply state (PHB, 202):

A spell cast with a bonus action is especially fast. You must use a bonus action on your turn to cast the spell, as long as you haven't taken a bonus action this turn. You cannot cast another spell during the same turn, except for a cantrip with a cast time of 1 action.

In your example, you have used your Bonus Action through Metamagic to launch Wall of Water. There is no exception for the water wall; it only creates control aspects of the battlefield within its area.

If you cast it in a space that contains a creature, that creature would be inside the Wall (though note that the Wall is only 1 'thick). Also note that only the 5 & # 39; section of the wall on which they are located (see below) turned into ice (and if it is destroyed, it is not filled with water).

The creature is now in 1 & # 39; of water and Ray of Frost's Cantrip tracking action interacts wonderfully with Wall of Water's response to cold damage:

Cold damage spells that pierce the wall cause the area of ​​the wall they traverse to freeze (at least one 5-square-foot section is frozen). Each 5 square foot frozen section has AC 5 and 15 hit points.

You would now have a Wall of Water with a frozen section containing a creature in its 5 'space (but only 1' thick ice).

But what can a frozen creature do?

This will probably depend on the table. There are no rules regarding being on ice. and what conditions it imposes (such as Restricted or Grappled).

How would i rule

It would probably give a Skill save to avoid ice (DC set by the caster, just like with Wall of Stone trying to catch someone) and then, in case of failure, give them restricted status.

dnd 5e: Is a creature in a wall of water trapped in ice when struck by Ray of Frost?

This is a great combination! The rules for casting two spells with one bonus action and one action simply state (PHB, 202):

A spell cast with a bonus action is especially fast. You must use a bonus action on your turn to cast the spell, as long as you haven't taken a bonus action this turn. You cannot cast another spell during the same turn, except for a cantrip with a cast time of 1 action.

In your example, you have used your Bonus Action through Metamagic to launch Wall of Water. There is no exception for the water wall; it only creates control aspects of the battlefield within its area.

If you cast it in a space that contains a creature, that creature would be inside the Wall (though note that the Wall is only 1 'thick). Also note that only the 5 & # 39; section the wall they are on (see below) is turned into ice (and if it is destroyed, it is not filled with water).

The creature is now in 1 & # 39; of water and Ray of Frost's Cantrip tracking action interacts wonderfully with Wall of Water's response to cold damage:

Cold damage spells that pierce the wall cause the area of ​​the wall they traverse to freeze (at least one 5-square-foot section is frozen). Each 5 square foot frozen section has AC 5 and 15 hit points.

You would now have a Wall of Water with a frozen section containing a creature in its 5 'space (but only 1' thick ice).

But what can a frozen creature do?

This will probably depend on the table. There are no rules regarding being on ice. and what conditions it imposes (such as Restricted or Grappled).

How would i rule

It would probably give a Skill save to avoid ice (DC set by the caster, just like with Wall of Stone trying to catch someone) and then, in case of failure, give them restricted status.

dnd 5e – Is a creature standing in an anti-magic field subject to the effects produced by Control Weather?

The spell says:

When you cast the spell, you change the current weather conditions (…)

Anti-magic zones, including the one produced by antimagic field, do not protect you from the weather. There is no mention in the control the weather spells that this climate becomes magical, only that you change the current climatic conditions.

One way to look at it is that you could be changing the weather conditions using your magic, but you are only changing the weather that was already there into something that the weather might have been (or could become) at some point. It is the difference between using magic fire versus non-magic fire to forge a worldly sword.

Another way of saying it: control the weather It doesn't say it creates a magical climate, so it doesn't. Also, it has a Self range, so it applies a magic effect only to the caster. This is what it says in PHB 202.

(…) Other spells, like the to protect spell, only affects you. These spells have a range of self.

The following is my own opinion now.

Given the:

  1. The weather changes with a magic spell; Y,
  2. The antimagic zones protect you from magic; Y,
  3. Spell range is a terrible indicator of who experiences magical effects; and especially
  4. It's more epic to see hail, wind and weather disappear around you.

So I would say that someone inside an anti-magic zone, like one produced by a antimagic field, it is perfectly safe from the weather caused by control the weather.

dnd 5e – If the Kill Words of Power spell is cast on a polymorphized creature, what happens?

PWK claims that

If the creature you choose has 100 life points or less, dies.

And Polymorph says that

The transformation lasts for the duration, or until the target drops to 0 hit points. or die.

Since, from the SRD,

A creature that has died he cannot recover life points until magic such as the revive spell has brought him back to life.

The creature then returns to its original form, but remains dead and unable to gain hit points.

This may sound like a broken combo, but it will waste your precious ninth level space and take a few turns while burning the target's legendary resistors to work (in case the target misses the very common WIS saving throw). From experience, decent martial fighters will get a creature within the 100 HP range almost as fast as a group of launchers that burn the target's resistances, and they will do it more efficiently.

dnd 5e: Can a creature take turns normally if it is inside an antimagic field while another creature casts Time Stop?

Time stop it is a spell that stops time for other creatures, allowing one creature to take several turns in a row. He says:

You briefly stop the flow of time for everyone but yourself. No time passes for other creatures, while taking 1d4 + 1 turns in a row, during which you can use actions and move normally.

This is certainly a magical effect. The spell causes the flow of time to stop for other creatures, and While You are taking multiple shifts, there is no time for them. I imagine antimagic field can beat it. The relevant text says:

Spells Any active spell or other magical effect on a creature or object on the sphere is removed while the creature or object is on it.

So, imagine a match between Annie, Tim and Charlie. Typically, the initiative might look like this:

Annie → Charlie → Tim

Suppose Annie casts time stop and rolled a 1 on his d4. Therefore, they take 2 turns in a row. The initiative would look like this:

Annie → Annie → Charlie → Tim

Now imagine that Tim threw antimagic field, and after her turn, Annie throws time stop. Suppose they roll a 1 on their d4 so they can take 2 turns in a row. What would the initiative order be like?

Here are some possible resolutions I can think of, but none of them totally satisfy me:

  1. Time stop defeats antimagic field. The order of the initiative is: Annie → Annie → Charlie → Tim. The reason this is not satisfactory is that time stop it doesn't seem to prevail because it's a spell, and antimagic field defeat spells.

  2. Time stop cannot be launched while there is an asset antimagic field, because there are some creatures for which you cannot stop time. The reason this is unsatisfactory is that there is no rule preventing these two spells from being active at the same time. Also, since there are things like viewers, it is not irrational to say that there is almost always an active anti-magic area somewhere in the world, and that means time stop it can hardly ever be used.

  3. The launcher time stop Y antimagic field they take turns normally while everyone else is frozen on time. Thematic and narrative, this seems the most logical. So we reviewed the turn order, treating each turn Alice would have taken as a full round. For this scenario, since Alice takes two turns in a row, we can imagine two rounds going by. Usually everyone except Alice takes a turn, but now we unfreeze anyone within an anti-magic area. So the initiative would be: Annie (time stop begins) → Charlie (frozen in time) → Tim (thawed) → Annie (time stop ends) → Charlie → Tim. The reason this is not satisfactory is because we are making progress on the "round count" now, possibly triggering things like den actions that are triggered by a certain count of initiatives. However, it has the side effect of allowing Tim to act normally, affecting other creatures if he wishes, because he is not bound by time stop And Annie isn't the one who breaks the spell rules.

  4. There is no answer to this question, and this is solidly in the DM allotment zone. This is unsatisfactory because, well, all questions answered that way tend to be unsatisfactory.

Then what is? Or is it an option that I haven't listed here? Can Tim take turns normally while inside a antimagic field if annie casts time stop?

dnd 5e – How does shipping work with a creature that doesn't speak any language?

I'm a wizard with a family owl (created by find familiar) that I wish to send on a long-distance delivery mission, requiring you to be away from me for several days. I would like to be able to verify my relative to make sure that he has not been attacked or has not been able to deliver. I hope I can do this using the sending spell, but I'm not sure how exactly the spell would work when communicating with a creature that doesn't speak a language. I am sure my family member would receive my message, as the spell says:

The spell allows creatures with intelligence scores of at least 1 to understand the meaning of its message.

However, it is unclear if my family member can respond, and if so, how. The spell says:

You send a short message of twenty-five words or less to a creature you are familiar with. The creature hears the message in its mind, recognizes you as the sender if it knows you, and can respond the same way right away.

So the spell says my relative can "respond in a similar way," that is, in "a short message of 25 words or less." However, my relative (an owl) does not speak a language, and it is not clear to me whether it is possible to respond without a language. On the other hand, if a creature can understand my message without needing to understand a language, it seems logical that it can also respond. So, RAW, is my relative capable of responding to me sending spell out? If so, what form does that response take? If not, can I know if my message was received (that is, if I can know if my relative is still alive to receive the message)?

dnd 5e: If an enemy is just below a 10-foot ceiling, is it within the melee range of a creature on the ground?

We came across a Vampire Spawn in the 10-foot-high basement of an old church. The first blow was mine, after which the creature attacked my ally and retreated to the ceiling when the thunderous roar of my Booming Blade punished its retreat. Still inexperienced and unsure about my range, after a brief consultation with my mind, I decided to spend my turn switching to my trusty crossbow and do some distance.

However, this turned out to be a mistake, as right after, the creature was on my face trying to rip my eyes out. Due to my agility I managed to avoid his attacks. Regretting my previous choice to switch weapons, I was left with the options to switch weapons and lose another turn, attack at a disadvantage, or use my crossbow as a makeshift melee weapon and rely on the Booming Blade to hold the enemy in place after disconnecting.

Maybe I should have changed weapons, but I decided that 1d4 (makeshift weapon) + 1 (magic ring) + 1d8 (booming blade) was good enough. I got lost

On the plus side, it was the lightning bolt assisted by my crossbow sniper attack that ultimately killed the Vampire by piercing his heart.


In this situation, would it have been possible to simply attack upwards instead of switching to the crossbow?

In the session, this was something to be looked up later and decided against, but I haven't come across any rules about attacking in 3D.

At over 5 feet tall and my melee range considered 5 feet, I should have been able to reach the ceiling, not to mention the Vampire Spawn hanging from it.


As for the exact measurements (read this part only if you like to analyze things unnecessarily):

My character is 5 ft 6 in / 5.5 ft, giving an estimated 7 ft 4 in / 7.3 ft foot reach (for a human, my character is a Kenku), a short sword blade measures 12 to 20 inches / 1 to 1.6 feet. This should give me a height of 8.3 to 8.9 feet of foot statically.

When testing it in real life, my estimated and standing reach matches less than 0.2 inches from the estimate on site and I'm not afraid to reach my standing ceiling statically. As a test, I tried to move as if it was attacking my ceiling, and based on where my hand could feel touching the ceiling, my finger length and how far I was to reach my ceiling, I estimate approximately 0.4 feet of additional height. Considering that I'm taller than my character, let's say he gives 0.3 feet, which increases the height to 8.6 – 9.2 feet and that remains unchanged in the way you hold the sword handle. Also, just lying on the floor, my torso and legs are approximately 0.6 feet.

Since my Kenku is not a human, just a humanoid, it is impossible to estimate the length of the arm that influences the foot range, however, considering that birds generally have a high wingspan and long legs, I think it is It is reasonable to suppose that the arms should be as long, if not longer, than that of a human.


So that would require the Vampire Spawn to be flat against the ceiling with no part hanging more than 0.2 to 0.8 feet to be out of my reach. I consider it unlikely.

What are the actual rules for this type of scenario or how do you handle it in your group? Should I allow melee attack on an enemy on the roof or in the air?

dnd 5e: Are there any balance issues with the familiar of the Find Familiar spell to be the elemental creature type (instead of celestial, fey, or demon)?

The spell find familiar allows a character to summon a familiar, who is a celestial, fey, or demon creature type spirit. From the spell description (PHB, p. 240):

You get the service of a relative, a spirit that takes the form of an animal (…) the relative has the statistics of the chosen form, although it is a heavenly, fey or demon (you choose) instead of a beast

Would there be any balance issues in allowing the relative to be the elemental creature type instead (ie adjust the description above to read "celestial, elemental, fairy, or demon (your choice)"instead)?

Elemental creatures are affected in the same way as celestial / fairy / demon creatures by other spells like protection against evil and good, prohibitionY exile (being permanently banished to his home plane instead of being trapped in a demiplane for 1 minute), etc., so being an elemental shouldn't allow the creature to avoid what would affect a RAW find familiar family.

That would have been the main thing I would suspect could affect balance, but I can't think of a spell that affects only celestials, demons and fairies, but no Elementals And I also don't think the concept of an elemental spirit creature summoned as a relative goes against the narrative theme of the spell.

Is there some strange interaction with an elemental relative that can make him more or less powerful than, say, a heavenly relative? My intention is that this does not affect balance at all.