dnd 5e – How does a demon possess a creature?

Since 1974, diabolical creatures have evolved, gaining and losing many powers and spells through the centuries. Through all this, the mechanics of possession they are illusory

Note that all editions of D&D have had careful descriptions about possession When necessary, consider the (in) famous ghost. Explain how the living target creature would lose control, what statistics change (or not) and how the ethereal form is transformed into a material body. The mechanics are demanding and have a really effective game usage. That's great.

Contrast this with the demon 5e Shadow: in the writing they claim to have some ability to possess goals, however, it seems that mechanisms for this ability are lacking. Most other demons seem to be devoid of all mind control powers all together. Even the only mental alteration of the almighty Pit Fiend does not extend beyond causing enemies to have a little fear … for six possible seconds. In a failed bran. Once a day. As long as one is not immune otherwise.

It would add a lot to a campaign to have someone, characters, player characters or even the players themselves (open for anything here), possessed by a demon. Keep in mind that StackExchange even presents a brilliant review on how to get rid of a demon once one has been taken over: this is a step by step / & # 39; How-To & # 39 ;. Is very good.

Long story short: How do demons possess (players or not) characters? Where are mechanics listed?

dnd 5e: Can a creature be too stupid to know if the companions of the lovely person are partners?

The effects of the spell are related to "you or your partners", regardless of whether the target realizes that they are your partners.

the charm monster The spell description says (the emphasis is mine):

You try to enchant a creature that you can see within range. You must make a saving shot of Wisdom, and you do it with advantage if you or your partners are fighting. If the saving throw fails, it will be enchanted until the spell ends or until you or your partners do something harmful. The enchanted creature is friendly to you. When the spell ends, the creature knows that it was enchanted by you.

(The Lovely person the spell has an almost identical wording, apart from working only on humanoids, and otherwise it works the same way).

The spell does not say that these things depend on whether the enchanted creature realizes that they are your companions. As such, this means that these effects (advantage in salvation if the partners are fighting against it, and the enchanted condition that ends if your partners do something harmful) apply simply based on whether they are really your partners, regardless of whether the target creature knows that they are.

The spell does not provide an explanation in the universe of how the spell determines that creatures are your companions, so you may have to substitute your own reasoning to explain it in the game. However, out of the game, this is simply how the spell works; It seems reasonable to interpret that "your teammates" refer to the other player characters (and possible allied NPCs) if the pitcher is a player character.

Can a legendary creature use a legendary resistance to pass a hook control?

If a player character fights a legendary creature, can they choose to escape? Technically it is not a saving shot, but a skill test.

dnd 5e: Does the See invisibility spell allow you to see a hidden creature?

Being hidden simply means that other creatures are not aware of the current location of the hidden creature. This is not always based solely on the view, although that is the most widely used method.

Stealth. Do a Dexterity check (Stealth) when you try to hide from enemies, dodge the guards, escape without being noticedor sneak up on someone without being seen or heard. (PHB, p. 177)

If Johnny is in sight and sneaks up from outside Billy's field of vision, stealth checking is not to see if Billy sees them; That is no longer possible since they are not looking in Johnny's direction. The secret in this situation is to see if they can move in silence, without alerting Billy of his presence. If at some point Johnny entered Billy's field of vision, the stealth roll would not matter and Johnny would no longer be hidden.

Similarly, if Billy is under the influence of see invisibility, this would not change the scenario, since Johnny's Stealth is based on defeating Billy's ability to hear him approach.

If Johnny is invisible, even if Billy turns around (possibly because Johnny fails his Stealth control to move silently), Johnny is still not visible. Billy can hear it and try to attack, but Johnny would be an invisible target due to invisibility.

There are particular class characteristics that produce warnings about this, but given the general scope of your question, they are not appropriate to mention at this time.

dnd 3.5e – What happens to creatures swallowed whole by a creature invoked when that creature is fired?

I am a magician and I have a particularly ominous idea. Okay, there are monsters that I can invoke with the "Swallow Whole (Ex)" ability, and then I discard my invocation after the summoned creature has swallowed the desired target (s).

What happens to the unfortunate souls that the creature has eaten?

Will they be left behind, or will they be taken with the creature to its native plane?

dnd 3.5e – Interaction between swallowing whole in a summoned creature and firing said creature

I am a magician and I have a particularly ominous idea. Okay, there are monsters that I can invoke with the "Swallow whole (ex)" ability, and then I discard my invocation after the summoned creature has swallowed the desired targets.

What happens to the unfortunate souls that the creature has eaten?

Will they be left behind, or will they be taken with the creature to its native plane?

-The swallowed creatures are still alive at the time of dismissal.

Does it matter if the creature is dissipated or banished?

dnd 3.5e – How long can a creature run without a constitution score?

As a primary source, the explanation in the Monster Manual (Page 312) for non-disabilities (it is not a zero score, but lacks the ability completely) is:

Disabilities: Some creatures lack certain ability scores. These creatures do not have a skill score of 0, they lack the ability completely. The modifier for a non capacity is +0. Other effects of disabilities are detailed below.

The section detailing the constitution specifically states (My emphasis):

Constitution: any living creature has at least 1 Constitution point.
A creature without a constitution has no body (a spectrum, for example) or metabolism (a golem). It is immune to any effect that requires a Fortress salvation unless the effect works on objects or is harmless. For example, a zombie is not affected by any type of
poison but is susceptible to a disintegrate spell out. The creature is also immune to ability damage, ability drain and energy drain, and automatically verifies Constitution checks. A creature without a constitution cannot get tired and, therefore, can run indefinitely without getting tired (unless the description of the creature indicates that it cannot run).

dnd 3.5e – In D&D 3.5, how long can a creature run without a constitution score?

According to SRD's entry on "non-skills," having a "-" in the constitution means:

A creature without a constitution has no body or metabolism. It is immune to any effect that requires a Fortress salvation unless the effect works on objects or is harmless … A creature without a Constitution cannot get tired and, therefore, can run indefinitely without getting tired (unless the description of the creature indicates that it cannot run).

Then, a creature without a constitution can run indefinitely.

There are at least three valid ways to reconcile this with the Compendium of rules:

  • The Compendium of rules is not a primary source. As such, it does not have the ability to override the basic rules. In this view, the Compendium is simply incorrect.
  • The Compendium of rules describes the rule, but the application is not clear: after the rounds of running NaN, a constitutionally challenged skellington must make a verification as described. The modifier for "-" is +0 (by explicit definition), but there is no reason to treat "-" as zero in general. Since no number is greater than or equal to "-", the fatigue check never appears.
  • The Compendium of rules describes only the general case, and the more specific language of the main books cancels it.

dnd 5e – If a creature is transformed into something, is that thing?

To be affected by the effects, it depends on the creature.

Depending on the creature, the ability to change shape generally describes which statistics are kept and which are not. For more details on what counts as statistics, you can see this question. Statistics are what determine how a creature counts.

For example, the werewolf states that (the emphasis is mine):

The werewolf can use its action to transform itself into a wolf-humanoid hybrid or a wolf, or return to its true form, which is humanoid. Their statistics, in addition to their AC, are the same in each form.

So, in the case of the werewolf, since the statistics block indicates that it is a Medium humanoid (human, shape changer) (This is the type of creature and the labels, part of the statistics), and this is not changed when changing form, you can not use something like mastering the beast in a changed werewolf, a spell that attacks to beasts and affects normal wolves (which are beasts).

Compare this to, for example, an ancient gold Dragon whose ability to change form establishes:

In a new way, the dragon retains its alignment, hit points, hit dice, ability to speak, skills, legendary resistance, den actions and scores of intelligence, wisdom and charisma, as well as this action. Its statistics and capabilities are replaced by those of the new form., except for any class characteristics or legendary actions that way.

In this case, the type of the Dragon changes to whatever is being transformed (humanoid or beast in this case), so it becomes a valid target for the effects that are directed only at those types of creatures.

dnd 5e – If a creature was flying through the Fly spell and dies, does it continue flying?

The Fly spell says:

You touch a willing creature. The target gains a flight speed of 60 feet for the duration. When the spell ends, the target falls if it is still in the air, unless it can stop the fall.

Since the spell does not say that it ends if the creature dies, would the spell continue to keep the deceased creature in the air for the duration of the spell, while the caster remains focused?