indian citizens – How to handle payments while travelling to Indonesia?

You likely can use your Visa debit card in foreign countries, but you should call your bank (or use their website) to notify them that you will be using it in other countries. Otherwise they may automatically block it.

You can also use an Indian ATM card in Indonesia, if it supports a compatible network (look at the card for icons on the back like “Plus” or “Maestro”). But only some ATMs support some networks, so this may be a hassle.

Or you could bring Indian currency directly to Indonesia and change it at a money changer in any city (during business hours only). This will probably get you a better rate than changing to USD at home then from USD to Indonesian currency in Indonesia.

If the amount is less than 1 lakh, it is probably not worth thinking too hard about what is the most efficient way, and just use the most convenient.

usa – Are US citizens obligated to disclose foreign citizenships to US border patrol upon entry?

This question appears to be about Customs and Border Protection immigration inspectors rather than Border Patrol officers. (Border Patrol is a distinct agency, although it is subordinate to CBP in the government’s organizational chart.)

Are US citizens obligated to disclose foreign citizenships to US border patrol upon entry?

No.

I know that US border patrol has the right to determine an individual’s admissibility to the United States.

US citizens cannot be found inadmissible. Grounds of inadmissibility apply only to aliens. See 8 USC 1182.

given that I am a US citizen, could I be arrested/denied entry if I do not wish to disclose my other nationalities for privacy reasons?

You cannot be denied entry. You can be arrested if the arresting officer has a warrant or probable cause to suspect that you have committed a felony. Now it’s possible to imagine circumstances under which your not disclosing additional citizenships might reinforce an officer’s suspicion that you have committed a crime, but by itself it cannot provide that suspicion, because of the fifth amendment.

In practice, of course, an immigration officer can make your life difficult by delaying your entry. While they are not supposed to delay you on immigration grounds once they are convinced that you are a US citizen, they can delay you on customs groundsz and they could probably even manufacture some uncertainty about your US citizenship if they were pressed to do so. For example, they could claim to be looking into whether you had performed any of the statutory “expatriating acts” that could result in your losing US citizenship (but only if you perform the act with the intention of losing your US citizenship, and the government formally presumes that you have no such intention).

Finally, in short, it’s not legal for them to demand an answer to that question, but they can nonetheless make your life difficult if you don’t answer it. There’s no judge looking over the immigration officer’s shoulder, and the only way for you to get the question before a judge is to file suit, a process that takes weeks to years. At the end of a long flight, if you want to get home, your best course of action is probably to answer.

eu citizens – Can I reside in Germany, in case I work for a Belgium company?

I am a Turkish citizen living and working in Germany. I don’t have a Blue Card. My wife is also a Turkish citizen living and working in Germany.
Recently I got an offer from a Belgian company. I want to know if it’s possible for me to get a work permit from Belgium and continue living in Germany with my wife. I’ll visit the company twice in a week, and other 3 days I will work from home.
Since I’m not a EU citizen, I couldn’t find an answer anywhere. So basically is it possible to be a “cross-border commuter” for a non-EU citizen?
https://europa.eu/youreurope/citizens/work/work-abroad/cross-border-commuters/index_en.htm

us citizens – During this travel ban (COVID) can my wife come visit me in the USA? I know I can visit there but not sure about her coming here

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us citizens – During this travel ban (COVID) can my wife come visit me in the USA? I know I can visit there but not sure about her coming here

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us citizens – How to deal with travel restrictions for American traveling to Germany for study

My son (an American) studied in Germany in 2019-2020 as part of the Goethe-Institut’s Studienbrücke program, which is intended to prepare non-German students for a course of study in Germany.

In the spring he came back to the US as the coronavirus pandemic started to heat up.

Now he wishes to return to Germany to continue his studies. For various reasons, he will continue with a year of Studienkolleg, a preparatory year offered by some German universities for students who need further language preparation. Entry into the Studienkolleg is determined by a test he will take upon arrival in Germany.

This means that when he arrives in Germany he will not have definitive proof that he can be a student. He does have proof (a letter from the university) that he is required to be in Germany to take the test, but it makes it clear that it is not a guarantee of admission. We had believed that this would nonetheless be sufficient under the exceptions to German travel restrictions (link), but a German friend called border control in Frankfurt and was told that this was unlikely to be sufficient for entry under the current (late August 2020) travel restrictions.

Meanwhile, we have read (link) that German border control may just generally allow Americans who enter on a flight from Ireland. In fact, the German university itself, when we were discussing the issue with an administrator there, told us that other Americans in a similar situation are planning to enter via Ireland.

I am hoping that someone can offer firmer data about whether that plan would work. In particular, does it matter whether he is staying in Ireland before? Is a layover sufficient, or should he stay in Ireland for a day, or should he self-isolate there for two weeks? Is there anything else he could do to make it more likely he would be admitted to Germany?

borders – Can immigration officers in airports make exceptions for citizens of a Covid-19-struck state who are not resident there?

I hold Israeli citizenship and passport and I am currently residing in Bangkok; I reside here nearly two years already – I didn’t visit Israel since I came here. I don’t hold Israeli residency status (i.e I am “a citizen which isn’t a resident”).

My current Thailand visa is amnesty visa which should end on 26/09/20.

If I won’t be able to obtain a new (non-amnesty) visa, I do plan to stay somewhere in east Asia or in a nearby part of Oceania.

My problem

While Thailand is a Covid-19 safe country with respectively very low number of cases and deaths, a “green country”, Israel is a Covid-19 struck country, a “red country” and currently (17/07/20) Israeli passport holders generally aren’t allowed to enter almost any country.

My question

Because I plan to stay as near as to Thailand as I can (for 3-6 months), I ask:

In general, can immigration officers in airports make exceptions for citizens which aren’t residents of Covid-19 struck states?

In other words, if a border officer examines my passport and can understand that indeed I didn’t visit Israel for almost two years but the government of that person’s state generally prohibits Israeli citizens from entering, do such officers, in general, have the authority to make an exception as I described?

Update

I think I shouldn’t ask several different questions each one almost identical but about another state; I would want to know about Vietnam, Laos, Philippines, Hong Kong and Singapore.

borders – In general, can immigration officers in airports make exceptions for citizens which aren’t residents of Covid-19 struck states?

I hold Israeli citizenship and passport and I am currently residing in Bangkok; I reside here nearly two years already – I didn’t visit Israel since I came here. I don’t hold Israeli residency status (i.e I am “a citizen which isn’t a resident”).

My current Thailand visa is amnesty visa which should end on 26/08/20.

If I won’t be able to obtain a new (non-amnesty) visa, I do plan to stay somewhere in east Asia or in a nearby part of Oceania.

My problem

While Thailand is a Covid-19 safe country with respectively very low number of cases and deaths, a “green country”, Israel is a Covid-19 struck country, a “red country” and currently (17/07/20) Israeli passport holders generally aren’t allowed to enter almost any country.

My question

Because I plan to stay as near as to Thailand as I can (for 3-6 months), I ask:

In general, can immigration officers in airports make exceptions for citizens which aren’t residents of Covid-19 struck states?

In other words, if a border officer examines my passport and can understand that indeed I didn’t visit Israel for almost two years but the government of that person’s state generally prohibits Israeli citizens from entering, do such officers, in general, have the authority to make an exception as I described?

Can French citizens flying from Bangkok BKK to SFO do an international, cross-terminal transit in Manila Airport (MNL) with the COVID-19 restrictions?

Ninoy Aquino International Airport (NAIA) a.k.a. Manila Airport (MNL) has 4 passenger terminals (mirror), 3 of them serving international flights:

  • NAIA Terminal 1: NAIA Terminal 1 serves almost all the international flights. It has west gates 1-7 and east gates 9-15.
  • NAIA Terminal 2: NAIA Terminal 2 houses international and domestic flights of the country’s flag carrier, Philippine Airlines or PAL.
  • NAIA Terminal 3: NAIA Terminal 3 serves the international flights which are not handled in NAIA – Terminal 1 as well as some domestic
    flights.
  • NAIA Terminal 4: NAIA Terminal 4 hosts flights from local and regional carriers.

I read on http://cms.olympicair.com/timatic/webdocsI/countryinfo.html (Philippines -> Visa -> TWOV) (thanks Crazydre for pointing me to it):

Philippines (PH): TWOV (Transit Without Visa):

  • Passengers with a confirmed onward ticket for a flight to a third country within 24 hours. They must stay in the international transit area of the airport and have documents required for the next destination.
  • TWOV does not apply when transiting between terminals. A visa and an airline escort are required.
  • TWOV does not apply to refugees and stateless persons.

This “TWOV does not apply when transiting between terminals” causes me concern, as I am considering taking the flight BKK -> PR 731 -> MNL -> PR 104 -> SFO, and PR 731 lands at MNL on Terminal 2 whereas PR 104 departs from MNL on Terminal 1.

Can French citizens flying from Bangkok (BKK) to San Francisco airport (SFO) do an international, cross-terminal transit in Manila Airport (MNL) with the ongoing COVID-19 travel restriction? Will I need a transit visa, and if so, can I get one on arrival or prior to departure?

Assume:

  • the French citizen has no tie and no visa/paperwork with Philippines;
  • “international transit” in Manila Airport (MNL) means that the route is: outside Philippines -> MNL -> outside Philippines;
  • “cross-terminal transit” means transit between two different terminals do the same airport.

Details regarding the flight information:

Flight PR 731 (mirror):

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Flight PR 104 (mirror):

enter image description here

Flight BKK -> PR 731 -> MNL -> PR 104 -> SFO (mirror):

enter image description here


The IATA information about Philippines says nothing about transit and transit visas aside from “Suspension of all visa exemptions and visa on arrival facilities”, which leaves the door open for obtaining a transit visa prior to departure if that’s possible:

Philippines (Published 06.08.2020)

  1. Passengers are not allowed to enter. This does not apply to:
  • nationals of the Philippines;
  • spouses or children of nationals of the Philippines traveling together or traveling to join the national of Philippines;
  • merchant seamen with a 9(c) visa issued by the Philippines;
  • nationals of India with a Temporary Resident Visa;
  • nationals of China (People’s Rep.) with a Permanent Resident Visa who is spouse of a national of the Philippines;
  • passengers with a 13(a), 13(b), 13(c), 13(d), 13(e), 13(g), RA 7919, EO324 or Native-born visa issued by the Philippines.
  1. Suspension of all visa exemptions and visa on arrival facilities.
  • This does not apply to spouses or children of a national of the Philippines.
  • This does not apply to parents of a minor who is a national of the Philippines.
  1. Passengers are subject to a Coronavirus (COVID-19) test at their own expense, they are subject to quarantine and must present a
    completed Case Investigation Form.
  2. Passengers traveling to Davao (DVO) must have a medical certificate with a negative Coronavirus (COVID-19) test result issued at most 72
    hours before departure.

uk citizens – What happens if a UK digital passport photo is rejected?

My situation: I’ve applied online for a replacement UK passport after losing my passport.

For various (irrelevant) reasons I’m convinced that the digital photo I used will be rejected. What happens if that’s the case? Will I need to restart the entire procedure? Will it be as simple as changing my photo?