dnd 5e – The desire spell and the repeated casting effects

Ultimately, it depends on the interpretation of your DM.

But I will say that option 1 is out of the question unless you are willing to risk the possibility of 33% of not being able to launch a wish again. This is because you are duplicating ALL the effects of the spell, including the part where you have to cast it in the same place every day for a year for that effect to be performed.

Of the other two possible ways for it to develop, I think that option 2 makes more sense. You are duplicating the effects of the spell as if it were the spell but without requirements.

However, I can understand why a DM can say that, since Wish is technically a different spell, it does not count for it unless the first cast is with Wish (in which case, casting the normal version of the spell would have no effect about it as it is again, a different spell).

Personally though I would say option two

The permanent form is a side effect of the repeated release, so Wish only performs 1 of the 365 necessary launches.

it makes more sense

Raycasting – sfml ray casting question texturizing my walls

I am using SFML 2.4.1 or higher to build my fps raycaster game and I want to texturize my walls instead of using the SFML color class with RGB colors to color the walls. Here is my code if everyone needs the rest of my code I can link it. I have my png images to texturize the walls.

Here is the pic example: enter the description of the image here

My code here:

                sf :: Color color;
switch (worldMap[mapX][mapY])
{
case 1: color = sf :: Color :: Red; break; //Red
case 2: color = sf :: Color :: Green; break; //green
case 3: color = sf :: Color :: Blue; break; //blue
case 4: color = sf :: Color :: White; break; //White
default: color = sf :: Color :: Yellow; break; //yellow
}

// gives the sides x and y different brightness
yes (side == 1) {
color = sf :: Color (color.r / 2, color.g / 2, color.b / 2);
}

// draw the pixels of the strip as a vertical line
// verLine (x, drawStart, drawEnd, color);

sf :: vertex line[2] =
{
sf :: Vertex (sf :: Vector2f (x, drawStart), color),
sf :: Vertex (sf :: Vector2f (x, drawEnd), color)
};
window.draw (line, 2, sf :: Lines);

}

dnd 5e – When casting Eldritch Blast + Agonizing Blast, what is added?

Add the modifier (+2)

How do you say, agonizing explosion allows one to "add your Charisma modifier to the damage [*eldritch blast] it is a blow. "(PHB p.110, emphasis mine)

your Charisma modifier is +2, as can be seen in PHB p.13. (Or many of us end up memorizing the mathematical rule: "subtract ten, divide by two, round down" to move from the score to the modifier).

As a side note: almost everything in the game will refer to your ability modifier instead of your skill Punctuation. The jump distance and the speed of movement in the Astral Plane are the two that occur to me in the head. Multi-class prerequisites and ability to push / pull / drag for those who track weight, armor prerequisites … some other things? Point of being, they are few and far between.

ars magica 5 – Can the ceremonial casting be applied to the magic formula?

No, not by default: on the same page, just after the big header that says "Spontaneous release" is the paragraph that begins: "The following options can only be used when a magician is using spontaneous magic."

Ceremonial casting is one of the options under that heading, and as such it can not be used with the foundry Formula.

Having said that, I am reasonably sure that I remember an option, a benefit of the house, a mysterious cult or something that allowed him to apply ceremonial bonuses to the casting of formulas, however, there are many source books for ArM5 and I do not remember where it could be . If I find it, I will edit this response to reflect that additional option.

dnd 5e – When casting a spell with a long casting time, what happens if you do not pass your action in a turn to continue casting?

Therefore, according to my reading, there are two different ways of interpreting this phrasing:

"You must pass your action every turn by casting the spell. [and if you don’t, the spell fails]"

This is the simplest thing: to continue casting the spell, you must continue to use your Action; If you do not, the spell fails. There is not much more to say about this.

"You must pass your action every turn by casting the spell. [literally. The spell physically compels you to continue casting until the spell is complete; you cannot choose to use your Action to do something else until the spell is complete or until your Concentration is broken]"

This is, in my opinion, a valid interpretation of the literal language as well.

[RegardlessofhowweintendtointeractwithotherrulesofemphasisIhaveseveralreasonstothinkthatthissecondinterpretationis[withoutconsideringintentorhowthisinteractswithotherrulesIshouldstressIhavevariousreasonsforfeelingthissecondinterpretationis[SinconsiderarlaintenciónocómoestointeractúaconotrasreglasdeboenfatizarTengovariasrazonesparasentirqueestasegundainterpretaciónes[withoutconsideringintentorhowthisinteractswithotherrulesIshouldstressIhavevariousreasonsforfeelingthissecondinterpretationisdo not how the rule should be interpreted, but that is a different answer for a different question.]

Basically, we have two meanings of the word & # 39; must & # 39 ;: in one case, indicates obligation: you should Keep using your action or the spell will fail. In the other case, it indicates compulsion: you. should keep using your action; he is not allowed to choose otherwise.

However, regardless of the interpretation, the interpretation of the user who cited, paraphrased below, I think is very unlikely:

"You must pass your action every turn by casting the spell. [but if you can’t or choose not to, the casting of the spell will continue or suspend]"

Only from the design point of view, it does not make much sense for an effect to say that it "must" do something to cause an effect, but it implies that if it does not do that, the effect will occur anyway. Consider the language of a spell as Animate dead:

On higher levels. When you cast this spell using a level 4 or higher spell slot, you animate or reaffirm control over two additional undead creatures for each level of the slot above the 3rd. Each of the creatures must come from a different corpse or pile of bones.

Animate dead, Player's manual, p. 212

It does not expressly tell us what happens if the creatures come from the same stack, but it is still clear from the context that the effect does not work if this is the case. Other effects in this game are written very similarly: if a condition is specified for what the pitcher "must" do, those conditions must be met. The absence of an explicitly stated consequence for not doing so is not necessary for such a consequence to exist.

Therefore, regardless of the interpretation I quoted is correct, the user who quoted is almost wrong. If the spell caster does not use his Action in a given turn to continue casting his spell, for whatever reason, the spell will fail. I have already indicated in my answer to the linked question that under certain circumstances (the Surprised condition, for example) Personally, at my table, I would ignore this rule, but as a general principle of the written rules, this is how the rule works.

dnd 5e: What happens if a pitcher is surprised to cast a spell with a long casting time?

Casting a spell with a long cast time requires that the caster use his action each time he casts the spell:

You must pass your action each turn by casting the spell.

However, what if, when casting a long casting spell (out of combat), a caster is suddenly attacked and surprised?

Surprised, the caster can not use his action during his turn to continue casting the spell, so the spell is forcibly lost? If it is lost, is it still considered that the caster is focused on him until his turn arrives?

This is important, in particular, for Pock, who is a war magic sorcerer of level 12, which is the ritual of throwing a hut when his group is ambushed. He would like to keep the spell cast as long as possible (or at least until he can actually take an action) to benefit from Durable Magic.

Thorn Whip Cantrip vs enemy Casting Dimension Door

Is it possible, as a reaction to the Warcaster feat using a Warlock / Druid, to launch the cantrip? thorn whip to drive an enemy away from his / her Dimension door spell out?

dnd 5e – Can I cast reaction spells like Shield or Counterspell when I am in the middle of a spell with a long casting time and I do not stop casting it?

Yes, you can use your reaction to cast another spell as long as it does not require concentration.

When casting a spell with a casting time longer than one action, you must concentrate on the casting process and use your action in each round to continue casting the spell:

When you cast a spell with a casting time longer than an action or reaction, you must pass your action every turn to cast the spell and you must maintain your concentration while doing it. If your concentration is broken, the spell fails …

Then, your throw is interrupted if, for any reason, you do not use or you can not use your action on your turn to continue throwing, or your concentration is broken. Assuming you continue to use your action, you only have to worry about your concentration being broken, which can be caused by a handful of effects, but the most important thing is that:

  • Cast another spell that requires concentration. You lose concentration in a spell if you cast another spell that requires concentration. You can not focus on two spells at a time.

Notably, casting a different spell is not enough to break your concentration; It must be a spell that requires concentration by itself.

This means that you can cast other spells while casting a spell with a long casting time, as long as you do not have to use your action to do so, and they are not concentration spells.

dnd 5e – Can I cast reaction spells like Shield or Counterspell when I am in the middle of a spell with a long casting time and I do not stop casting it?

Yes, you can use your reaction to cast another spell as long as it does not require concentration.

When casting a spell with a casting time longer than one action, you must concentrate on the casting process and use your action in each round to continue casting the spell:

When you cast a spell with a casting time longer than an action or reaction, you must pass your action every turn to cast the spell and you must maintain your concentration while doing it. If your concentration is broken, the spell fails …

Then, your throw is interrupted if, for any reason, you do not use or you can not use your action on your turn to continue throwing, or your concentration is broken. Assuming you continue to use your action, you only have to worry about your concentration being broken, which can be caused by a handful of effects, but the most important thing is that:

  • Cast another spell that requires concentration. You lose concentration in a spell if you cast another spell that requires concentration. You can not focus on two spells at a time.

Notably, casting a different spell is not enough to break your concentration; It must be a spell that requires concentration by itself.

This means that you can cast other spells while casting a spell with a long casting time, as long as you do not have to use your action to do so, and they are not concentration spells.

dnd 5e – Can I use reaction spells like Shield or Counterspell when I'm casting long casting spells and I keep casting them?

Yes, you can use your reaction to cast another spell as long as it does not require concentration.

When casting a spell with a casting time longer than one action, you must concentrate on the casting process and use your action in each round to continue casting the spell:

When you cast a spell with a casting time longer than an action or reaction, you must pass your action every turn to cast the spell and you must maintain your concentration while doing it. If your concentration is broken, the spell fails …

Then, your throw is interrupted if, for any reason, you do not use or you can not use your action on your turn to continue throwing, or your concentration is broken. Assuming you continue to use your action, you only have to worry about your concentration being broken, which can be caused by a handful of effects, but the most important thing is that:

  • Cast another spell that requires concentration. You lose concentration in a spell if you cast another spell that requires concentration. You can not focus on two spells at a time.

Notably, casting a different spell is not enough to break your concentration; It must be a spell that requires concentration by itself.

This means that you can cast other spells while casting a spell with a long casting time, as long as you do not have to use your action to do so, and they are not concentration spells. You can cast other spells using your reaction or even using additional action on your turn without interrupting the casting of the longest spell.