dnd 5e: would you allow the Artificials to exchange a cantrip on a long break?

Context: I am implementing the unearthed Arcana of Variants of class characteristics, which do not include Artificer, for a party with several spellcasters and an Artificer.

This UA allows each "known" caster to replace a spell with another one of its level in prolonged rest, also known as Spell Versatility, and each "prepared" caster (with cantrips) to replace one of its cantrips with another one in the upper level , also known as Cantrip Versatility.

However, the effect of Cantrip Versatility is already inherent in the Artificer class. I have considered allowing the Architect to have Versatility of spells for cantrips. But I'm not sure if this is balanced or not, since it goes beyond what other "ready" pitchers received.

Would you allow the Artificers to exchange a cantrip on a long unbalanced break?

I am open to suggestions for alternative replacements / improvements that make the implementation of this AU more fair for the excluded class.

dnd 5e – Would the exchange of cantrip Artificers on a prolonged break would not be balanced?

https://dnd.wizards.com/articles/unearthed-arcana/class-feature-variants

Context: I am implementing the Arcane unearthed variant of class characteristics, which does not include Artificer, for a party with several spellcasters and an Artificer.

This UA allows each "known" caster to replace a spell with another one of its level in prolonged rest, also known as Spell Versatility, and each "prepared" caster (with cantrips) to replace one of its cantrips with another one in the upper level , also known as Cantrip Versatility.

However, the effect of Cantrip Versatility is already inherent in the Artificer class. I have considered allowing the Architect to have Versatility of spells for cantrips. But I'm not sure if this is balanced or not, since it goes beyond what other "ready" pitchers received.

I am open to suggestions for alternative replacements / improvements that make the implementation of this AU more fair for the excluded class.

dnd 5e – How cantrip infestation interact with poison immunity?

I really like this spell for my druid and I was wondering if the effect of no damage from the spell would still take place, even if a creature has immunity to the Poison its saving throw fails.

The target must succeed in a save shot of the Constitution, or take 1d6 damage per poison and move 5 feet in a random direction if it can move and its speed is at least 5 feet. Roll a d4 for the direction: 1., north; 2, south; 3, this; or 4, west. This movement does not cause attacks of opportunity, and if the rolled direction is blocked, the target does not move.
(XGtE p.158)

Obviously the damage would be zero, but would the affected creature still have to make a Throw of Salvation and, in case of failure, make it move in a "random direction"?

dnd 5e: Is it the blood transfer cantrip that my player came to me with excessive power?

Concerns about this

Note: I guess the intended use of this spell is sacrifice your own HP to save someone else, so any use that does not result in the HP running out of HP is abusive.

1. Duration of THP

Usually, temporary hit points have a finite duration. As written, the THP granted by this spell does not expire, which allows stupid tricks such as using the spell to give someone almost all your hit points, and then rest a lot to recover them. In the morning they will still have THP. Once they discover this, you will have a character that starts every day with a lot of extra HP. (There is a small amount of risk when going to sleep exhausted every night, but that is one of those risks that is easily colored as "DM is bad" if it ever appears).

2. Combining with normal spells / healing effects to create a buffer.

If someone at the party can issue to heal wounds, helpor Crom helps you, healing spirit, they can do a similar trick to turn spell slots into a THP block (and it doesn't even require a long break) The type of Blood Transfer can give you your HP, then go play at the source of healing spirit to recover everything, then (if it is fast) give your HP to another person and recover it again, and so on. And since this only requires a few minutes and a spell space and is fully repeatable, again, expect them to routinely say "we do that Blood Transfer again to get our temporary HP."

Similar problem if it is a druid with Wild Shape and can give you the HP of a body that is not even going to keep.

The only way to really fix this is for Blood Transfer to reduce maximum hit points, such as a vampire bite (which is literally a blood transfer, so there is a precedent). That sounds tough, but combined with a reasonably short duration (such as "until your next short break") really should only block spell abuse.

3. Disciple of life and blessed healer

A vital domain cleric can add 2+ (spell level) to the hit points restored by his spells. This allows them to transfer Blood for a net gain of 2 points, and since it is a cantrip, a pair of Life clerics with this spell can increase arbitrarily high in this way.

There is a similar problem with the Life domain on the 6th level, where such spells restore HP to the caster. They only get 2 HP for it, but again, it is a cantrip, they can simply send it by spam. For the rest, nothing in the spell language prevents them from choosing zero hit points and only have free healing forever.

Both gaps require you to consider that Blood Transfer is a spell that restores hit points, which may not be the case, so I suggest you discard in advance that it is not, just to avoid problems later.

4. This is not harm.

"Sacrifice hit points" is not the language that the game normally uses, but you should make it clear that the loss of the hit point no harm. It cannot be reduced by anything that reduces the damage, does not activate anything that happens when you take damage, you cannot be resistant to it, etc. For greater protection against mischief, it would be advisable to specify that the spell only grants THP equal to the actual value lost in hit points, not the number you would have lost in some hypothetical case.

Spells: Does a level 1 wizard who casts the Ray of Frost cantrip deal damage equal to 1d4 + spell casting modifier?

A level 1 wizard who casts a frost beam inflicts 1d4 + its damage spell modifier.

As noted, a cantrip automatically rises to half the wizard's level, rounded up. Therefore, a level 1 assistant can increase somewhat to 0.5 * 1, rounded. 0.5 * 1 = 1. Therefore, the cantrip can only be cast as a level 1 spell (it is the minimum level). As a level 1 spell, frost beam deals 1d4 damage plus its spell casting modifier.

A different way of thinking about this (but that comes to the same conclusion) is that the frost beam is a level 1 cantrip. A cantrip is a spell. Since the highest level spell slot your level 1 assistant has is also level 1, there is no real chance of increasing the spell. The Cantrips page he linked to says it this way:

For a typical spellcaster, this means that its level is equal to the highest level of spell space it has.

dnd 5e – Would the Prestidigitation cantrip taste mask a food / drink that would otherwise not be edible?

If something were rejected only for its flavor, then yes, prestidigitation can prevent that

the prestidigitation spell states:

[…] Cool, heat or season up to 1 cubic foot of non-living material for 1 hour […]

Actually, we don't learn if too eliminate other flavors but at least, Some The combination of flavor could eliminate existing ones and also add what you would like. Or rather, if there were any thing that was being mechanically rejected by a creature only for its taste, then yes, prestidigitation I could avoid this because it changes the taste of what would be rejected.

But that is everybody The spell does, does not change the chemical composition of the article, or anything except its taste. If the body rejects it for some other reason, this spell will not help you.

dnd 5e: Can the Prestidigitation cantrip turn swamp water into cocktails?

This question was inspired by "Can the spell purify food and drink?
Make ocean / sea water drinkable?
".

Prestidigitation can do the following (among other things):

• Instantly cleans or dirties an object no larger than 1 cubic
foot.

• Cool, heat or season up to 1 cubic foot of non-living material
for 1 hour.

• You create a non-magic trinket or an illusory image that can fit in your hand and lasts until the end of your next turn.

Let's say I launch Prestidigitation to make a trinket, this trinket is a glass.

I use the glass and fill it with swamp water.

I launch Prestidigitation to instantly clean the object (glass full of water) and I have clean water.

I cast Prestidigitation to flavor the water, let's make it with the flavor of pina colada.

I launch Prestidigitation to cool clean water with a taste of pina colada.

Bam: a delicious pina colada made of swamp water and magic.

Would the actions listed above work? Did I just invent the most profitable tavern in history?

dnd 5e – As DM, what are the important changes in the play caused by Detect Magic that are no longer a 5tr cantrip?

In D&D 3.5 and Pathfinder 1, Detect Magic was a cantrip. That meant it was possible to launch it many times a day, and get useful information in 1 to 3 rounds.

In 5e, it is a first level spell, but a ritual. It means that it can still be used quickly, or it can be used an indefinite number of times per day, but not both.

Since I DM worlds are usually rich in magic, what changes in the game should I expect? How can I use this change in Detect Magic for the benefit of the story?

I'm not looking for an essay, just to main points that came with your experience in DMing 5 adventures with significant magic to be detected or to remain hidden.

dnd 5e: What exactly is the verbal component of the cantrip prestridigitation?

the prestidigitation Cantrip can be among the most versatile spells in the entire game, and the effects that can be created vary widely.

Since the spell requires verbal and somatic components, we should probably assume that this applies to all these different effects. However, if for example you want to use it to fool someone or create a distraction, the verbal component could completely ruin your plan.

Has there been any clarification on what the verbal component is and how it can vary depending on the desired effect?

dnd 5e – Cantrip of "healing" damage elimination

The DMG directly states that a cantrip should not offer healing. The obvious problem with a healing cantrip is that the party could heal after each encounter. But what if the cantrip were only usable during fights, p. By demanding that the healed damage be dealt in the last round?

It is felt that this could be balanced considering that if a character spends its healing action, it is not causing harm. Therefore, the monster dies more slowly, causing more damage to the party. If healing cancels that damage, we are at hand. For example, suppose a monster deals 10dmg / round and dies in 3 rounds if the 4 players hit it. With 3 players, he dies in 4 rounds, causing additional damage of 10. Extending this over 5 pitches (4 rounds + 1 extra after the fight ends), a cantrip that heals 2 sounds reasonable.

I ran some numbers using the recommended HP / DMG statistics per CR and the players dealt 1d10 + 4 (scaled on 11/5/17) and hit rates of 0.65 and 0.4 for players and monsters and it seems that the cantrip should heal 3.6hp, then 1d6 (scaled to 2d6 / 3d6 / 4d6 on 05/11/17). Something like:

Within a round after someone receives damage, you try to repair their wounds and reverse up to 1d6 of damage (no more than the damage inflicted). This is not considered a hit point restore effect. Higher levels: avoid 2/3 / 4d6 at the 11/5/17 level.

At low levels, it is balanced against Healing wounds, which heals more than twice, then becomes obsolete (but so do damage spells). Another possibility would be to have a medical check-up, possibly based on the monster's DC salvation and increase healing a bit.

Does this sound reasonable? Am I missing something? Obviously the fights will take (a little) more time, but that's acceptable. I am more concerned about the balance of intended use (only during combat, when spending an action to launch it is significant), rather than a feat to obtain unlimited healing.