dnd 5e – Does the UA Barbarian Path of the Beast Claw Add the Strength Modifier to Damage?

I was looking through the options for the 3rd level Path of Beast feature, Form of the Beast, and I noticed no mention for any damage modifiers on hit.

Claws. Your hands transform into claws, which
deal 1d6 slashing damage on a hit. (UA 2020, Pg. 1)

In comparison to this, the Aarakocra race gives you the Talons, specifically mentioning the damage value + the Strength modifier.

Talons.
Your talons are natural weapons, which you can use to make unarmed strikes. If you hit with them, you deal slashing damage equal to 1d4 + your Strength modifier, instead of the bludgeoning damage normal for an unarmed strike. (DND Beyond)

I am curious about this, because in another question, people have asked about the claws in an attack action, referencing damage values to include the Strength modifier.

—- Take Attack Action —-
attack with Greataxe (1d12+2+STR)
attack with Claw (1d6+2+STR)
attack with Claw (1d6+2+STR)
(From Can you wield a Greataxe and Claws…?)

dnd 5e – Can you wield a Greataxe and Claws with the UA Barbarian Path of the Beast?

The UA Barbarian Path of the Beast has the following option when you rage:

Claws. Your hands transform into claws, which deal 1d6 slashing damage on a hit. When you take the Attack action on your turn and make an attack with your claws, you can make one additional attack using your claws as part of the same action.

Can a level 5 Barbarian attack with a Greataxe or other two-handed weapon then attack twice with their claws?

This would look like this:

—- Take Attack Action —-
attack with Greataxe (1d12+2+STR)
attack with Claw (1d6+2+STR)
attack with Claw (1d6+2+STR)

On one hand it seems that it is allowed by the rules considering nothing is mentioned about only attacking with the claws or that the claws cannot hold a weapon.

On the other hand it seems odd to make two attacks with claws while holding something.

On the third hand (which may or may not be required) the feature makes no mention of the claw attacks needing to be from different hands.

dnd 5e – Can a raging barbarian carry live rabbits to kill them, in order to keep his rage going?

No, that’s not how rage works.

Murdering random rabbits does not fuel rage. A barbarian’s rage works as follows:

It ends early if you are knocked unconscious or if your turn ends and you haven’t attacked a hostile creature since your last turn or taken damage since then.

First of all, if you’re carrying rabbits around and treating them nicely, then the rabbit presumably is not hostile. It may become hostile if the barbarian suddenly attacks it, but by then it will be dead.

Second, this will require the serial killing of many, many rabbits. Eventually you will run out.

By comparison, it would be more efficient for the barbarian to maintain the rage by damaging themselves. This would fulfill the “or taken damage since then” clause. On rounds where they can’t attack an enemy, they smack themselves with an unarmed attack, or use the hilt of their weapon as an improvised weapon. They have resistance to physical damage during a rage, so this probably won’t hurt them very much.

Recommendation: Make attack rolls anyway.

In general, the barbarian should be attacking every round in a rage. If you really need to keep the rage going, then make attack rolls. They don’t have to hit.

For example, the barbarian could carry some spare throwing weapons or some ranged weapon. That way, if your enemies are out of your movement and melee range, then the barbarian can make a thrown or ranged attack each round while moving toward the enemies. Even if these attacks miss the enemy, they will keep the rage going until the barbarian has closed in.

dnd 5e – Can a barbarian maintain rage by attacking a creature that is not present?

Suppose a raging barbarian does not see any opponents on the battlefield but is attempting to maintain rage by attacking a hostile creature, according to the following:

Your rage lasts for 1 minute. It ends early if you are knocked unconscious or if your turn ends and you haven’t attacked a hostile creature since your last turn or taken damage since then.

If there was a successfully hidden opponent on the field, the barbarian would be permitted to attack it by guessing its location. Even if they were incorrect, that would be sufficient to maintain their rage.

But how far ‘off’ is the barbarian allowed to be in their guess and still have the attack count?

Suppose the successfully hidden opponent has actually left the field without the barbarian knowing.
Does the fact that the opponent is not actually there prevent the barbarian from making an attack on an unseen opponent?

If yes, and the rage ends, the player then gains information about the fact that the opponent is not present (which seems to go against the spirit of “If the target isn’t in the location you targeted, you automatically miss, but the DM typically just says that the attack missed, not whether you guessed the target’s location correctly.”)

If no, and the barbarian is allowed to attack an opponent that is not actually there based on the plausible belief that an opponent is present, then what prevents the barbarian from postulating an opponent who could be there? For example, the barbarian invokes an NPC that has successfully hidden against the party before – is it enough to maintain rage for the barbarian to say that they believe said NPC is present and Hidden and then attempt to attack them as an unseen opponent?

Somewhat related: A barbarian’s belief that they are attacking an opponent is apparently not sufficient to maintain rage if what they are attacking is an illusion. So attacking a not-creature that is there is not enough to maintain rage, but is it enough to attack an actual creature that is not there?

dnd 5e – How do I kill a 20th level raging Zealot Barbarian?

Brute force won’t work, but any other effect will work, provided it is hit point-dependent

At first blush, the 20th level Zealot Barbarian seems unkillable, and this is true if you play the Barbarian’s game by engaging them in direct melee combat. Indeed, by RAW the Barbarian could massacre an entire army of mundane soldiers and continuously maintain their rage until they were able to find any sort of healing to recover the minimum 1 hit point necessary for them to keep on trucking.

However, 5e has a handful magical effects that can be used to reliably handle this situation, though.

  • Sleep: It’s only a 1st level spell, but if you can reduce the
    Zealot’s hit points enough (or upcast the spell high enough), you can
    forcibly end the rage by knocking them unconscious. If you do this
    when the Zealot is at 0 hit points and has failed 3 death saves, they
    will die on the spot.
  • Power word kill: If you can get the Zealot below 100 hit
    points, you have the option to drop them outright with this.

This is a fairly short list that curiously hits both ends of the spellcasting spectrum, but either will stop the Zealot on the spot.

There are a few other options accessed by turning into a creature with true polymorph or some other method to access them. These all require you to reduce the Zealot to 0 hit points, be aware that it can be difficult to do this because the Zealot can make several saves due to Relentless Rage to instead be reduced to just 1 hit point:

  • Shadow Dragon’s Shadow Breath (MM, p. 85) will instantly kill a
    creature reduced to 0 hit points by this attack.
  • Mind Flayer’s Extract Brain (MM, p. 222) will instantly kill a
    creature reduced to 0 hit points by this attack.
  • Phase Spider’s bite attack will paralyze a creature for 1 hour
    if the poison reduces them to 0 hit points, which means that the rage
    will lapse after 1 minute and the Zealot will die.
  • Swarm of Centipedes’ bite attack (MM, p. 338) will paralyze a
    creature for 1 hour if the poison reduces them to 0 hit points, which
    means that the rage will lapse after 1 minute and the Zealot will
    die.

These methods are most viable after you’ve reduced the Zealot to 0 hit points since you won’t trigger their Relentless Rage, which the Zealot can probably reliably make 2-3 times before it starts getting tricky. I’ve avoided effects that rely on trying to reduce the Zealot’s maximum hit points to 0. While they technically would work, you would find yourself spending an absurd number of rounds trying to reduce a feasible 275 maximum hit points.

One last method that would reliably work is:

  • Forcecage: Trapping the Zealot in creates a situation whereby
    you can plink down the Barbarian’s hit points and implement any of
    the other strategies.

dnd 5e – Does the Totem Barbarian feature Aspect of the Beast; Eagle overcome Sunlight Sensitivity?

These features do not interact at all

Aspect of the Eagle removes sight limitations based on distance. It doesn’t say anything about anything else that might impose limitations on sight. It doesn’t give you the ability to ignore Sunlight Sensitivity anymore than it gives you the ability to see in perfect darkness or through walls. To quote the relevant sentence again here:

You can see up to 1 mile away with no difficulty, able to discern even fine details as though looking at something no more than 100 feet away from you.

This is all about making it easier to see things at a distance. You can’t just take take a sub part of one sentence and interpret it however you want while ignoring the context that explains what it means.

For that matter, if you need any more evidence for that just take the next sentence:

Additionally, dim light doesn’t impose disadvantage on your Wisdom (Perception) checks.

If this was meant to give you Superman-vision that can completely ignore anything and everything that could conceivably be considered an obstacle to seeing things then this would be completely redundant with the first sentence, but this is clearly stated to be an additional feature, meaning the author of the second sentence clearly didn’t think the first sentence implied it.

So how does this scenario play out?

Your kobold can see well up to a mile into the distance with no trouble making out details. If they (or what they are looking at? I don’t remember if this applies to Kobold’s sunlight sensitivity as well) is in sunlight, Sunlight Sensitivity kicks in and imposes disadvantage anyway (if the DM decides that the situation calls for a perception roll, which is not necessarily the case! If for example you were making out facial features of a statue a mile away you should be able to see it as well as if it was 100 feet away; Sunlight or not, I personally would not ask for a perception roll to be able to see obvious non-hidden things at such short distances). The two features are completely orthogonal that way.

dnd 5e – Unarmored Defense (Barbarian plus sorcerer plus monk)

Waaaaiiittt what about level 3 draconic sorcerer, with another level in barbarian for unarmored defense, and another level in monk… (Total level 5 character) Would that make it Base AC=13 + con + dex + wis? And then running a warforged would add +1 to AC, Plus 2 to con, and +1 to int, str, or wis… Could a Level five character do that in the first place? and if it can, would the unarmored defense work like that?

dnd 5e – Can a Wild Magic Barbarian restore a 7th(+) Level Warlock’s spell slots?

The first dot point is correct. The feature says the creature “regains one expended spell slot, the level of which equals the number rolled or lower”; the Warlock in question has no expended spell slots that meet the level requirement, so they cannot regain them. The feature doesn’t say it grants new spell slots, so the warlock gets none at all.

This is functionally the same as a wizard who has only used a third level spell slot who is the target of the feature when a 1 or 2 is rolled. They have no applicable expended spell slots, and so they regain none.

Despite the comma, I think it’s clear the level of the spell slot is a restriction on what spell slot can be recovered, not assigning a level to it after the fact. The wording of the wizard’s Arcane Recovery feature is similar:

Once per day when you finish a short rest, you can choose expended spell slots to recover. The spell slots can have a combined level that is equal to or less than half your wizard level (rounded up), and none of the slots can be 6th level or higher.

The levels of the spell slots here are described in a separate sentence, but again I think it is clear this is a restriction on which spell slots can be recovered, not an alteration of them.

dnd 5e – Can a Path of the Totem Warrior barbarian have different totems chosen for each subclass feature at the same time?

I was creating a goliath Path of the Totem Warrior barbarian (PHB, p. 50), and had chosen the Bear totem for his 3rd-level Totem Spirit feature. The 6th-level Aspect of the Beast feature, however, felt like overkill for a Bear totem/goliath combination, since the combination would double his carrying capacity twice. I wondered if I could choose a different totem at 6th level.

I did notice the following language for each subsequent totem choice after the first (at levels 6 and 14):

At ___ level, you gain a magical benefit based on the totem animal of
your choice. You can choose the same animal you selected at 3rd level
or a different one.

My first assumption was that this is like swapping out spells known when you level in some spell casting classes, such as the bard (i.e. if you choose Wolf at 6th level, your abilities switch over to a Wolf Totem barbarian). After all, in online discussions, people often refer to a Bear Totem barbarian, or a Wolf Totem barbarian, but never do I see reference to a multi-totemed Barbarian. However, I wanted the 6th-level Wolf ability, but didn’t want to give up the 3rd level Bear ability.

Can a Path of the Totem Warrior barbarian have multiple totems? That is, can they have different totems chosen for each subclass feature at the same time?

dnd 5e – At level 6, can a Totem Warrior barbarian choose a second option from the Totem Spirit feature in place of the Aspect of the Beast feature?

The Path of the Totem Warrior barbarian’s 6th-level Aspect of the Beast feature says (PHB, p. 50):

At 6th level, you gain a magical benefit based on the totem animal of your choice. You can choose the same animal you selected at 3rd level or a different one.

This means that it’s possible for a Barbarian who selected the bear totem spirit for the Totem Spirit feature at level 3 (which grants resistance to all damage types except psychic while raging) to, e.g., select the eagle totem spirit at level 6 (which enhances their eyesight).

However, is it possible for a Totem Warrior barbarian, when they reach 6th level, to select another totem spirit option from the 3rd-level Totem Spirit Feature instead of selecting one of the options from the 6th-level Aspect of the Beast feature?

For instance, if a Totem Warrior barbarian has selected the bear totem at level 3, can they choose to gain the eagle totem’s 3rd-level benefit (while raging, you can Dash as a bonus action) when they reach 6th-level?

As the 3rd-level Totem Spirit feature is “lower” in some terms, I wouldn’t mind allowing it. This would create a 6th-level barbarian with extra resistances who is able to Dash as a bonus action, a pretty fast tank character (for example).

The same question also extends to the Totemic Attunement feature at 14th level. When a Totem Warrior barbarian hits level 14, can they select another (not yet selected) totem from the previous levels?