dnd 3.5e – Does an Arcane Hierophant without animal companion obtain a companion familiar?

Upon entering the Arcane Hierophant class you obtain a “Companion Familiar”, the feature description says you have to dismiss your familiar but you may retain your animal companion if you have one.

Companion Familiar: Upon becoming an arcane hierophant, you must
dismiss your familiar, if you have one (You do not risk losing XP for
doing so.) You may retain any one animal companion you already
possess. You add your arcane hierophant class level to your druid or
ranger level for purposes of determining your animal companion’s bonus
Hit Dice, natural armor adjustment, and Strength/Dexterity adjustment
(see the sidebar The Druid’s Animal Companion, page 36 of the Player’s
Handbook). For example, a character who is a 4th-level druid/3rd-level
wizard/4th-level arcane hierophant has the animal companion of an
8th-level druid (+4 bonus HD, +4 natural armor, and +2
Strength/Dexterity adjustment, or an animal companion chosen from the
4th-level or 7th-level lists). In addition, your animal companion (if
any) gains many of the abilities that a familiar would normally
possess. You add your arcane hierophant class level to your arcane
spellcasting class level, and determine the Intelligence bonus and
special abilities of your animal companion accordingly (see the
sidebar Familiars, page 53 of the Player’s Handbook). For example, a
4th-level druid/3rd-level wizard/4th-level arcane hierophant has a
familiar companion equal to that of a 7th-level wizard and 8th-level
druid (Intelligence 9, alertness, improved evasion, share spells,
empathic link, deliver touch spells, speak with master, speak with
animals of its kind, devotion). The Hit Dice, hit points, attack
bonus, saving throws, feats, and skills of the familiar companion are
determined as normal for an animal companion. Due to the familiar
companion’s unusual Intelligence score, it may very well have more
skill points than other animals of its kind. The familiar companion is
a magical beast (augmented animal), but you can bestow harmless spells
on your familiar companion as if it were an animal instead of a
magical beast. If your familiar companion is killed or dismissed, you
do not lose XP. You can summon a new familiar companion by performing
a ceremony requiring 24 hours of uninterrupted prayer.

It is not clear to me what happens when you become an AH using classes that don’t have the Animal Companion feature (like a Cleric/Scout/Wizard, for example). Do you still get a companion familiar?

While i reckon it says “if any” in parenthesis, I find it weird the specifics of a class feature to be left to such an expression. Also, unlike the wild shape feature, it doesn’t state you don’t get it if you are not a druid.
On top of that (even if it should be related to the death of an companion familiar, but the wording seems to be vague about this implication) it also tells you how to get a new one by performing a ritual.

Me and my group always end up thinking the AH is a great class but its features are really poorly worded

dnd 5e – Can a willing creature targeted by the Animal Shapes spell choose to return to their normal form before the spell as a whole ends?

No

Nor can the caster “drop” the animal form although they can use an action to transform a target into a new beast. It is a concentration spell so the caster can choose to end it for everyone at any time.

There are no secret rules. If it doesn’t say it, it doesn’t do it.

Becoming unwilling

See Can you make an unwilling creature willing? In other words, what defines “willing”?

This is a DM call as to whether a “willing creature” must be willing only at the time the spell is cast or must remain willing throughout the duration to remain a valid target.

Unlike most other circumstances where a target becomes ineligible, deciding to be willing or not has no cost.

It also seems to treat “willing” as some sort of ‘active’ state that you must consciously remain willing or the spell fails – what if, momentarily, you doubt the sense of being a lobster? Does that momentary doubt make you unwilling and drop you back into your original form?

Similarly, if you are rendered unconscious or go to sleep does the spell end? The designer suggests an unconscious creature is not willing.

As a DM, I would not want to deal with all that and would rule that if you are willing to have the spell cast on you, it doesn’t matter if you change your mind later.

dnd 5e – Can a willing creature targetted by Animal Shapes choose to drop the animal form

No

Nor can the caster “drop” the animal form although they can use an action to transform a target into a new beast. It is a concentration spell so the caster can choose to end it for everyone at any time.

There are no secret rules. If it doesn’t say it, it doesn’t do it.

Becoming unwilling

See Can you make an unwilling creature willing? In other words, what defines “willing”?

This is a DM call as to whether a “willing creature” must be willing only at the time the spell is cast or must remain willing throughout the duration to remain a valid target.

Unlike most other circumstances where a target becomes ineligible, deciding to be willing or not has no cost.

It also seems to treat “willing” as some sort of ‘active’ state that you must consciously remain willing or the spell fails – what if, momentarily, you doubt the sense of being a lobster? Does that momentary doubt make you unwilling and drop you back into your original form?

Similarly, if you are rendered unconscious or go to sleep does the spell end? The designer suggests an unconscious creature is not willing.

As a DM, I would not want to deal with all that and would rule that if you are willing to have the spell cast on you, it doesn’t matter if you change your mind later.

r – Error creating ltraj (animal movement path)

I am trying to create an ltraj object (AdehabitatLT package), but I get this strange error message (sorry, it appears in Italian): "Error in x1 $ x – x2 $ x: argomento non numerico transform in binary operatore".

This is the code I am using:

real = read.csv ("ELKwinter_demo2.csv", sep = ",", strings = F)
da <- as.character (elkdf $ date)
head (da)
gives <- as.POSIXct (strptime (as.character (real $ date), format = "% d /% m /% Y% H:% M"))
Name <- as.factor ($ actual path)
xy = real (, c ("x", "y"))

data <- as.ltraj (xy, date = da, id = Name)

head (real)
X x y date date 2 hour
1 1 652,336.97 552,610.92 01/27/2016 18:00 01/27/2016 18:00
2 2 652,942.26 552,536.50 01/28/2016 07:00 01/28/2016 07:00
3 3 653,000.66 552,392.38 01/28/2016 8:00 PM 1/28/2016 8:00 PM
4 4 65,259.87 552,333.74 01/29/2016 09:00 01/29/2016 09:00
5 5 652,509.83 552,366.96 01/29/2016 10:00 PM 01/29/2016 10:00 PM
6 6 65,265.76 552,353.26 01/30/2016 11:00 01/30/2016 11:00
id path cycle_id
1 EV001_20588 EV001 20588
2 EV001_20588 EV001 20588
3 EV001_20588 EV001 20588
4 EV001_20588 EV001 20588
5 EV001_20588 EV001 20588
6 EV001_20588 EV001 20588

Can anyone help me understand what the problem is?

Thanks in advance

dnd 5e – Does this home turtle break as an animal companion to the UA's Revised Ranger (Beast Conclave)?

The ranger player in my party asked me the other day if I could make him a snapping turtle for a pet (he's using the UA's Revised Ranger, the Beast Conclave). After looking in the Monster Manual And online, I couldn't find anything that really worked for me.

I made the following stat block for a possible animal turtle companion:

Snapping turtle

Medium beast, any alignment


Armor class 14 (natural armor)
Hit points 30 (4d8 + 12)
Speed 15 feet, swim 30 feet


begin {array} {cccccc}
text {STR} and text {DEX} and text {CON} and text {INT} and text {WIS} and text {CHA} \
16 ; (+ 3) & 8 ; (- 1) & 16 ; (+ 3) & 2 ; (- 4) & 12 ; (+ 1) & 6 ; (- two)
end {array}


Shot savings Str +5
Senses Passive perception 11
Languages
Challenge 1/2 (100 XP)


Hold your breath. The snapping turtle can hold its breath for 1 hour.

Behavior

Snap. Melee Weapon Attack: +5 to hit, reach 5 feet, one target. Hit: 6 (1d6 + 3) penetrating damage.

Header Melee Weapon Attack: +5 to hit, reach 5 feet, one target. Hit: 8 (1d10 + 3) blunt damage. Deals 2 (1d4) recoil damage to the turtle. Critical failure results in 5 (2d4) damage to the turtle.

Shell defense. The snapping turtle can retreat to its shell as an action. Until it emerges, gain a +4 bonus to AC and have an advantage on Strength and Constitution save throws. While in its shell, the turtle is prone, its speed is 0 and cannot be increased, it has a disadvantage on Dexterity saving throws and cannot react. The only action you can take is an additional action that emerges from your shell.

Is this Snapping Home Turtle balanced as a companion animal for the UA's Revised Ranger (Conclave of the Beast)?

dnd 5e: create a companion animal for my UA ranger. Too much OP?

So my ranger asked me the other day if I could make him a snapping turtle for a pet (he's using the UA's revised Beast Conclave). After searching the Monster Manuel / Online, I did not find anything that really worked for me. I made the following stat block for a possible turtle.

Snapping turtle

Medium beast, any alignment


Armor class 14 (natural armor)
Hit points 30 (4d8 + 12)
Speed 15 feet, swim 30 feet


begin {array} {cccccc}
text {STR} and text {DEX} and text {CON} and text {INT} and text {WIS} and text {CHA} \
16 ; (+ 3) & 8 ; (- 1) & 16 ; (+ 3) & 2 ; (- 4) & 12 ; (+ 1) & 6 ; (- two)
end {array}


Shot savings Str +5
Senses Passive perception 11
Languages
Challenge 1/2 (100 XP)


Hold your breath. The snapping turtle can hold its breath for 1 hour.

Behavior

Snap. Melee Weapon Attack: +5 to hit, reach 5 feet, one target. Hit: 6 (1d6 + 3) penetrating damage.

Header Melee Weapon Attack: +5 to hit, reach 5 feet, one target. Hit: 8 (1d10 + 3) blunt damage. Deals 2 (1d4) recoil damage to the turtle. Critical failure results in 5 (2d4) damage to the turtle.

Reactions

Remove. When attacked by an enemy, as a reaction, the turtle can completely withdraw within its shell. While in its shell, the animal gains +5 AC against enemy attack.

Is this too overpowered?

Dungeons and Dragons: How did the role of animal companions change between different D&D editions and which classes had access to them?

In D&D 3.5, druids had animal companions. In D&D 5e, only the Beast Master Ranger subclass seems to have one. This made me wonder about the history of this feature in general.

What classes had access to pets in which D&D editions and how did their skills differ?

dungeons and dragons: how did the role of animal companions change between different editions of DND and what classes had access to them?

In DnD 3.5, the Druids had fellow animals. In DnD 5e, only one Ranger (Beastmaster) seems to get one. This made me wonder about the history of this feature in general.

What classes had access to pets in which edition of DnD and how do their skills differ?

dnd 3.5e – How do I effectively control a new companion animal in a way that does not slow down the party?

It is rare for a druid to have to push his animal companion. They receive many bonuses for Handle Animal, and it is generally assumed that the Druid has had a lot of time with the companion animal, much to teach him many tricks.

Total tricks: not only 1

A pet starts with one extra trick, above the previous ones, that animal could be taught if it were not a companion animal. See bonus tricks:

The value given in this column is the total number of "bonus" tricks that the animal knows in addition to anyone the druid can choose to teach him (see the ability to handle animal). These bonus tricks do not require any training time or Handle Animal controls, and They do not count against the normal limit of tricks known to the animal. The druid selects these bonus tricks, and once selected, they cannot be changed.

and handle animals:

An animal with an intelligence score of 1 can learn a maximum of three tricks, while an animal with an intelligence score of 2 can learn a maximum of six tricks.

So, your animal companion really knows four or seven tricks, depending on your intelligence.

Link: manage animal bonuses for your animal companion

In addition, Druids receive substantial bonuses for handling their pet:

Link (Ex)

A druid can handle his animal companion as a free action or push it as a moving action, even if she doesn't have any rank in the Animal Handle ability. The druid wins a Bonus of +4 circumstances in all wild empathy controls and Handling animals performed with respect to a companion animal.

Keep in mind that if you are riding your mount, you are probably not using your movement action at all: your mount is making the move, after all. Therefore, using your movement action to push your animal companion will not slow you down unless you fail. DC 25 is quite high on the first level, even with +4, but on some levels it will be quite easy. And he shouldn't have to press his animal companion frequently.

Training: usually takes-10

Among that, the four classify you should you have, you easily have a +8 bonus to Handle Animal on the first level. Maybe +7 or even +6 if you threw Charisma, but you could also have +9 or +10 if you invested in it. Anyway, +5 is enough to take-10 to train many tricks, and +10 will give you any of them. Since you don't need to use Handle Animal for bonus tricks, you can use the bonus trick to get one of the DC 20 tricks (for example, Attack or Defend), and get DC 15 tricks for those in which you actually train the animal.

For level 3 or so, you should have up to +10 and, therefore, be able to take 10 in any trick training you want to do.

Background story: this is usually where training occurs

Keep in mind that most druids start the game with an animal companion, instead of acquiring one during the game. Usually, they have been with the animal companion for quite some time when the game begins, and therefore they have had time to train the animal companion in all its tricks. They may have even had time to train without taking 10, since you can continue testing Animal Handling controls until you succeed (each failure takes half the time for successful trick training).

Therefore, training should not, in most cases, slow down the party. However, your backstory or the nature of the game can avoid that; Talk to your DM about it.

dnd 5e – HP calculation for UA beast master animal companion

I am a very new DM in DnD 5e, and one of my players is a ranger. While browsing the publications here and there, we decided to use the UA, since everyone says that the RAW Ranger is mediocre. She got her wolf in a small parallel story, and I would like to establish statistics for her partner. I read through the UA, and it says:

For each level you earn after the 3rd, your animal
the partner wins an additional hit die and increases his hit points
in consecuense.

Now this confuses me a lot, and by continuing to investigate how HP is calculated, I don't even understand the statistics of the simple Wolf enemy.

So, in the Monster Manual, the HP of the wolf is 11 (2d8 + 2).

First question: How is this calculated? The average of 2d8 should be 10. 10 + 2 is 12.

Second question: What is the blow of a wolf? If it is 1d8, in case the wolf is in "level 1", its HP should be 10 (maximum hit + modifier with). If it is considered to be level 2, your HP should be 17 (Max hit die + avg hit die + with modifier). What am i missing?

Third question: I found a post on a reddit DnD site where someone calculates the statistics of a wolf in case the ranger is at level 7. It goes like this:

Wolf

Medium beast, your alignment

Class 17 armor

Hit points 35 (6d8 + 6)

Speed ​​40 feet.

STR 12 (+1)

DEX 17 (+3)

WITH 12 (+1)

INT 3 (-4)

WIS 12 (+1)

CHA 6 (-2)

Competition Bonus +3

Skills: Perception +4, Stealth +6, Choice Skill, Choice Skill

Savings: Str +4, Dex +6, With +4, Int -1, Wis +4, Cha +1

Senses: Passive Perception 14

Stock bite. Melee weapon attack: +6 to hit, reach 5 feet, one target. Impact: 11 (2d4 + 6) of penetrating damage. If the target is a creature, it must succeed in a Force 12 DC save throw or be knocked down.

I think I could solve everything except HP.

My first assumption was to start with the base 11 HP given as a level 3 partner. That in level 4, he gains an additional 7 (5 hit dice + con modifier). And the same goes for levels 5, 6 and 7, for a total of 11 + 4 * 7, totaling 39.

If I start from 2d8 + 2, and I only add a hit die every time the ranger levels up, I can understand the 6d8 mentioned in the post, but I don't get the +6 modifier. Shouldn't it be +10? Base modifier +2 at level 3 and +2 for every 4 levels totaling +10. And now the problem is that averaging this value leads to 40, not 39, this problem comes from my first question.

I am completely lost here.

One last question. the Bite attack says +6 to hit. I can explain this since the DEX modifier became +3, and the competition bonus also became +3, however, I don't understand the reason why the DEX modifier is used for the Bite attack instead of STR.

Thank you very much for the reply!