dnd 5e – Can I use a Forgotten Realms Adventure League Character in an Eberron AL Game?

Getting reading for GenCon and I’ve got a Lvl 5 Lizardfolk Paladin that I’d like to use in a series of Eberron games at GenCon. Other than some cursory googling, I don’t know much about Eberron besides that it’s pulpy, steam-punk DnD. I’ve been looking for something different and this sounds right up my alley.

I wonder if this particular character is the best fit for the setting though. From what I’ve read, deities work differently in Eberron. Would there be any reason, thematically and/or rules-wise, that a GM wouldn’t let me use this character?

dnd 5e – How can I prepare for DMing the Curse of Strahd adventure effectively?

Prep one session around your players

After a few sessions of LMoP, you will have a good idea of how far your party can get in a day. Even though CoS is somewhat sandboxy, there’s no way they’re going to end up in

Vallaki, Kresk, The Winery, the Amber Temple, or the castle

in the first session. Travel takes time as well, and you can throw some combat encounters at them along the way to cities that you haven’t fully prepped to finish out the rest of a session. Both inside and outside the cities, there’s a hierarchy of things that do not need to be fully ready to go as soon as the characters reach the city.

Choose your session end point carefully

If your players are in a particular city with multiple things to do and see, and they choose a path you didn’t anticipate, leave them on a cliffhanger. Obviously this doesn’t work if you literally just sat down, but if you choose your end point such that a particular action on their part is unresolved, you know what they are going to do first next time. End the session when they, exhausted after a rough day of travel, finally see the gates of the next location. You then know that they will need an intro to a particular city at the start of the next session.

Steal

Many other DM’s have run CoS and written it up, on blogs of their own, reddit, and here. They’ve all fleshed various things out, emphasized the bits they or their groups found important or compelling, and can help direct your prep a little.

Withhold information from your players

Don’t give the players a reason to leave

Vallaki or Kresk

before you’ve fully prepared the next area. You should know where they are likely to go next, based on the hooks you’ve provided, and maybe all their investigative efforts until you’ve prepped what comes next point to things inside the city, or the questgivers could indicate that what they are asking for is a very dangerous endeavor. Or,

the Baron catches them on the way out and directly asks them to participate in that days festival, and we all know how much the Baron loves festivals. I had a festival ready to go that required the players participation and had to use it to keep them in town for the remainder of the session.

You’re the DM. There are so many tools at your disposal to keep them away from parts of the adventure you’re not ready for them to experience. Remember,

Strahd has his eyes and ears everywhere, and knows the players movements even before they do sometimes. If they try to go to the castle, Strahd could send them a message, or ambush them. The woods are fraught with peril and the Vistani and wolves are under Strahd’s influence.

product identification – Need help remembering the name of an adventure (Shadowrun)

I played and later GMed this adventure sometime between 2000 to 2003 and we were playing a hybrid of Shadowrun 2 and Shadowrun 3 (not all the 3rd ed books were out yet).

The adventure focused around a simsense star (or similar celebrity) the players have to protect.

I think in the start the players had to fake a kidnapping (for publicity) and someone else actually tries a real kidnapping at the same time (can’t remember if this was real or added by the GM).

Later in the adventure she is kidnapped by an insect shaman(?) and was/is to be used as a host for an insect spirit queen. The players are kitted up by the megacorp who wanted the star back and they enter and fight their way through the hive. The megacorp bugged all the gear the players borrows with simsense recording gear and in the epilogue the star dies and the megacorp turns the player’s hive fight into a simsense film.

dnd 5e – What official adventure awards the “Home Sweet Home” story award?

The module in question is CCC-BMG-18 ELMW1-3 The Battle of Elmwood, the third part of the Misaligned Trilogy by Baldman Games.

Characters that successfully completed this adventure earn the story reward “Home Sweet Home”. (…)

This character has been given a plot of land in Elmwood by the Elmwood Council to use as their permanent residence. This plot of land can be either sized for a comfortably large house in the main area of the town of Elmwood OR about an acre of bare land out in the farmlands for some crops or a ranch, a barn, and a farmhouse. Future Elmwood adventures will have more information about how to upgrade this residence.

The module includes a player handout depicting the deed/title.

The grateful town of Elmwood

A module in the subsequent series, CCC-BMG-34 ELM 2-1 Tendrils in the Fog, offers a small benefit (a free potion) to characters who have “Home Sweet Home”, but no information about upgrading the residence is included in the ELM2 trilogy. There is no third series I’m aware of.

dnd 5e – How to make the Observant feat worthwhile, but not boring, in a 1:1 adventure?

I’ve started DMing a one-on-one D&D 5e adventure. The PC took the Observant feat and as a result, has really high Passive Perception and Investigation (20 and 18 at level 1!). If I use the rules from this question (“if passive perception is higher than the DC, the PC doesn’t have to make a roll to succeed”), then essentially every single perception and investigation check in the scenario I’m running is an automatic success.

In a group setting, that’d be OK: this makes the PC better at scouting, which is rewarding and fun, and it’s generally nice to be the only/first one in the group noticing things. In a solo adventure, however, I’m afraid that it’s going to be somewhat boring. There’s less of a “wow” effect to noticing small, hidden details when there aren’t people around to be impressed by it.

Should I just stop worrying about it, and simply be OK with my player basically automatically succeeding in every perception/investigation check without thinking twice about it? Or is there a way to tweak the mechanics somehow to make it cooler or more interesting?

dnd 5e – What official adventure gives this particular story award?

A while ago (last spring) I played a 5e AL adventure and received a story award, I believe it was called ‘home sweet home’, in which each adventurer recieved a home in the city the adventure took place in – but I don’t remember what the name of the city or adventure was.

Does anyone know, or know how to find out?

dungeons and dragons – Looking for a late 80’s (or possibly early 90’s) D&D one-shot adventure based around a bar room brawl

In “The Best of White Dwarf – Scenarios Vol. 1”, published in 1980, pages 26 and 28-29 (27 was an advertisement) feature the adventure “A Bar-Room Brawl – D&D Style” by Lew Pulsipher.

Further reading of the adventure includes details of numerous characters to interact with, a hex map of a bar room, and rules for using objects in the environment like tables, chairs, or “small cauldrons of hot stew.”

On a related note, a resource that I sometimes use to find old adventures is AdventureLookup.com, which is an offshoot of a Matt Colville project and recently received a big update (at time of writing). It doesn’t seem to feature old White Dwarf articles, but it does provide an index of adventures (and where to legally obtain them) from multiple publishers across various editions of D&D and Pathfinder.

dungeons and dragons – Looking for a late 80’s possibly early 90’s D&D adventure based around a bar room brawl

In “The Best of White Dwarf – Scenarios Vol. 1”, published in 1980, pages 26 and 28-29 (27 was an advertisement) feature the adventure “A Bar-Room Brawl – D&D Style” by Lew Pulsipher.

Further reading of the adventure includes details of numerous characters to interact with, a hex map of a bar room, and rules for using objects in the environment like tables, chairs, or “small cauldrons of hot stew.”

On a related note, a resource that I sometimes use to find old adventures is AdventureLookup.com, which is an offshoot of a Matt Colville project and recently received a big update (at time of writing). It doesn’t seem to feature old White Dwarf articles, but it does provide an index of adventures (and where to legally obtain them) from multiple publishers across various editions of D&D and Pathfinder.

gm techniques – How do I run an adventure with the party in competition with an NPC party in a race for the MacGuffin?

I’m looking at the next leg of our campaign being a “race for the MacGuffin” scenario. The PCs (Rolemaster) have been chasing an evil sorceress for a while now. I want to let them catch up but put them in a position where they can’t actually kill her. She’s working for someone powerful who will come after them if they kill her. But it’s in a mercenary role so if they can get the MacGuffin for him he won’t care what happens to her after that.

The problem: I’ve never run or even read an adventure with competing adventuring parties. Can someone point me to some good resources?

I’m looking for published adventures (from any system), blog posts with adventure design ideas, direct advice from the folks here, and/or anything else that can help me figure out how to pit one party against another without having it be a straight up brawl.

The best list of spell magicians in the second level of adventure [closed]

Which is the best spell magician in the second level and why?