Exposure: Why did my Canon 80D recommend such a fast shutter speed in near total darkness?

This morning I went out to photograph the sunrise. I left long before dawn, and it's a new moon day, so it was very dark while I was getting ready. I changed the ISO to the maximum setting for composition and focus purposes with aperture in f / 8. The exposure meter recommended a shutter speed of 1 s, which was road too short. I got a discreet but good exposure with a shutter speed of 30 s. This is a difference of approximately 5 stops.

I obtained the same meter readings using the evaluation and average measurement modes.

At this point, I started ignoring the exposure meter and firing a lot of test shots to mark everything (I'm glad I came out so early), but I'm curious why he gave this reading. Once there was enough light to distinguish the characteristics of the landscape with the naked eye, the measurement system began to give healthy results again.

Why did I get such an unstable measurement result in those conditions? Does the camera simply give up and avoid reading in so much darkness?


Bonus Details!

When I first set up, I was still in open priority mode since my last session. I was just trying to get a starting point, so I pressed halfway in this mode, and suggested 1 s, which I already thought would not be enough. I assumed that maybe there was a built-in limit so that Av mode didn't give a slower shutter speed than that, so I switched to manual immediately. But even then, the exposure meter was reading about 0 with a shutter speed of 1 s, and off the bright end of the scale at 30 s, which gave a good image.

Most recent Canon 80D or 250D

I'm looking to get a good second-hand 80D nick for £ 500 (body only). This is a good discount compared to a new 80D, but I wonder how it compares to a 250D. I can get this new one for basically the same price (with a Canon EF-s 18-55mm f / 4-5.6 IS STM lens included).

Main disadvantages that I see of the 250D: slightly smaller sensor (332 mm ^ 2 versus 338 mm ^ 2), continuous shooting with a lower maximum shutter (5 versus 7 p / sec).

This will be my first DSLR. I'm thinking that while the 250D was launched at a lower price category, which makes it look like a cheaper / lower quality camera, the time between releases (3 years) means that the 250D is basically as good as the 80D , but in this case the new brand, can also handle 4K video and is much lighter. (Two main advantages that I see that it has).

Canon EOS 80D live view off

When looking at the menu options in the live view, the screen remains on for only a few seconds. I could not locate how to increase the time.

Canon 80D vs Canon M50

I was about to buy the 80d canon, in any other research I found about the m50 canon. I'd like to have a good video too, but I'm not too worried about that. I'm more interested in photography.

What confused me was the maximum shutter speed, that is, 1 / 8000s in 80d versus 1 / 4000s in m50. Also, with the ISO, that is, 100-16000 (100-25600) in 80d versus 100-25600 (100-51200) in m50.

Therefore, before buying a new camera, could you recommend which one would be better with your experience in case of a better dynamic range, low light performance, lenses, sports, etc.? Or, if you could recommend a better camera in this price range ($ 800 – $ 1000).

Why are there dark corners when using Sigma 85mm F1.4 EX DG HSM with Canon 80D?

This is a known problem with some third party lenses. All you need to do is go to the lens aberration correction menu and turn off the peripheral lighting correction.

This happens because Sigma copies the lens code of another Canon lens. The body of the camera sees this lens code, applies the correction it thinks it should be and gets strange patterns.

How to fix strange visual behavior with your third-party lens

Canon 80D: dark corner in the image with Sigma 85 mm F1.4 EX DG HSM

This is a known problem with some third party lenses. All you need to do is go to the lens aberration correction menu and turn off the peripheral lighting correction.

This happens because Sigma copies the lens code of another Canon lens. The body of the camera sees this lens code, applies the correction it thinks it should be and gets strange patterns.

How to fix strange visual behavior with your third-party lens

lens: Canon 50mm f / 1.2 with Canon EOS 80D is suitable for portraits, landscapes, travel and night photography?

Beyond the fact that 50mm is probably too long for a single lens solution in an APS-C camera for landscape and travel photography:

The EF 50mm f / 1.2 L is designed for a very specific purpose: to take wide-aperture portraits. That is all that is really optimized to do it very well. Some of the design decisions made to achieve this goal make it unsuitable for tasks in which even the much less expensive prime 50mm lenses can do better.

For example, the modest EF 50 mm f / 1.4 is probably a better lens to use in landscapes with medium apertures of around f / 8. So is the EF 50mm f / 1.8 STM! If you can find one, the discontinuous PE 50 mm f / 2.5 discontinuous macro would be much more suitable for performing art reproduction jobs or documents for flat objects (or for shooting flat test frames at short distances).

This is because the simple double Gauss design of f / 1.2 L leaves much of the field curvature of the lens uncorrected. This causes the lens to generate a curved focus field. It also allows the lens to become very soft outside the focus areas, particularly the lights out of focus. That is where this lens shines and why many portraitists are willing to pay the price requested by it.

Although it is a rather expensive lens, that does not mean that it is "better" than any other 50 mm lens less expensive for each purpose in which one wants to use a 50 mm lens. It means that it is a specialized tool that many experienced photographers have trouble learning to use effectively.

If the EF 50 mm f / 1.2 L were a car, it would be an exotic sports car with an unsynchronized manual gear transmission and a relentless suspension of "race tuning". It's great to go very quickly in the hands of an expert on the track. But a Toyota Corolla is more suited to driving in the city's traffic.

Lens: use Canon 50mm f / 1.2 with Canon EOS 80D for portraits, landscapes, travel

I am buying my first DSLR camera (Canon 80d) in a few weeks and I want to use it mainly for portraits, landscapes, travel / nightlife. I found the canon ef 50mm f / 1.2L and I wanted to know if it is a good lens for those types of shots I want to take.

Canon 77D or 80D

I'm new to DSLR. When I look for one with features and price range, I found 77D and 80D. I have seen the differences in technical specifications in both cameras from many sources, but what I did not understand is how it makes a difference in the action. And I also realized that something like the lens is more important than the body (I'm not sure how much is true). Every difference confuses me more in choosing the right one.

I would like to be able to click on a squirrel or a flying sparrow. Since I did not find this anywhere, can anyone suggest which of these (or none of them) has the capacity for that?

The Canon 80D shoe does not trigger triggers constantly

I'm shooting with a practically new Canon 80D. Everything was fine and now my flashes are failing. I'm controlling my Flashpoint 600 with the trigger mounted on the 80D's shoe. For some reason, now it does not fire, when I press the test button on the trigger, it always works. I tried a different trigger from another light and the same. Every once in a while it shoots, so I'm not sure what's happening.