dnd 3.5e – Can a lone non-magical human deal with flying targets without projectile/thrown weapons?

Flying mount

Hippogriff (fly speed 100ft, average maneuverability, cost 2,000 to 4,000gp)

Pegasus (fly 120ft, average maneuverability, cost 2,000 to 4,000gp)

Dragonnel (fly 90 ft, average maneuverability, cost 5,000 to 10,000gp – Draconomicon p151)

Grafts

Feathered Wings, 10,000gp (this takes magic to attach, so check with your DM, but this should be considered extraordinary once attached). If you are of good alignment, this may drive you insane. (See Fiend Folio, page 210).

Membranous Wings, 50,000gp (similar to feathered wings, but more expensive and grants energy resistances) (See Fiend Folio, page 211).

Buffeting Wings, 100,000gp (similar to the other two, slower, imposes a Dex penalty, but avoids the alignment issue — see Races of the Dragon p 127-8).

Zelekhut Wings, 100,000gp (no alignment restrictions, unclear who can make/attach them. Dragon #313, p 46, thanks to Zachiel and Hey I Can Chan for finding)

Feats

Starspawn – grants flight (average maneuverability, half base land speed, may use for a number of rounds equal to 1+Con mod)

Dragon Wings – requires you to have a DM that allows you to start the game as a Dragonborn of Bahamut as this is a first level feat, so you are no longer a human, and you lose all your human abilities (this feat grants gliding only)

Improved Dragon Wings – requires Dragon Wings (see above), but at 12 HD, grants at will flight.

Dragon Steed – gain a dragonnel steed/cohort (Draconomicon, p 105)

Wild Cohort – gain essentially an animal companion. At 7th level, you can gain a Dire Bat, which has 40 ft good maneuverability.

Leadership – gain a flying cohort, many of these options are quite good.

Ritual

Becoming a Dragonborn of Bahamut allows you to gain wings without feats. Just choose the Wings option, and by 12 HD, you will be able to fly as if you took Dragon Wings and Improved Dragon Wings.

Class levels

An 8th level Ranger is treated as a 4th level Druid for the purposes of determining animal companions, allowing them to pick up a Dire Bat (fly 40ft, good maneuverability).

A 17th level favored soul grows wings (fly speed of 60ft, good maneuverability). You may be unable to use your magic, but you would have wings. (This may not be possible, as a favored soul is a primary casting class, and you were looking for martial class, but I felt it bore mentioning, as their flight is nonmagical.) (Complete Divine, pp 6-10).

Epic skill checks

Epic balance would allow you to balance on liquid or clouds. You may be able to use this to balance on rain? Very iffy.

Get the enemy to land

Create a mundane disguise of something that would attract the enemy. For instance, you mention a harpy in the comments. Dress as an injured harpy needing aid. Call out to the flying harpy. Ask for help. When they come to assist, have your friends pounce.

dnd 3.5e – Can a non-magical human deal with flying targets without projectile/thrown weapons?

Say that for whatever reason, a martial character can’t use any projectile (sling, bow, etc.) or thrown (javelin, bloodstorm blade’s Throw Anything, etc.) weapons.

The whole region is also covered in a constant antimagic field, so supernatural attacks like the fan the flames maneuver won’t work (not that 30 feet is really going to counter most flying enemies), nor will a potion of fly or a magic sword with some sort of ranged special ability. It would also be a waste to take a spellcasting class and become a dragon disciple, since this is a martial character, and they live in an antimagic field.

And obviously the character isn’t of a race that has a fly speed of its own, because that would make it a non-issue. Let’s say they’re human.

Is there any way for the character to attack flying enemies (especially flying, ranged ones) from the ground, or bring the enemies down to the ground, or bring themselves up to the enemies in the sky (who we can assume are beyond any reasonable jump check and aren’t dumb enough to hang out near climbable walls)?

I’m expecting that this will rely on extraordinary class features or feats (which we’ll say are all available, unless they have a magical/non-human prerequisite), but there could be some other type of solution, I dunno. (Not 100% sure on the tags because I don’t know what sort of features will work)

dnd 3.5e – In this situation, what are the best tactical uses for at-will major creation?

Edit: This question may be moot. Based on the answer to this question: here, I may be deleting this question entirely, as it may be irrelevant. I appreciate everyone who has been thinking about this, but it may not be possible to use major creation tactically at all.

The party is about to face in battle a beholderkin, an overseer (Lord of Madness 139–40) and its allies:

  • a beholder (Monster Manual 25–7)
  • 2 directors (LoM 137–8)
  • 7 spectators (LoM 140–1)
  • 8 gauths (MM 26)

Additionally, the overseer has has successfully used its dominate person eye ray against a blue thrallherd who commands a small army of goblins. The overseer is aware of the party’s capabilities.

The PCs are tier 4 and level 11 with typical wealth for their level. The PCs include an adept/church inquisitor, a fighter/rogue/master thrower, a ranger/halfling outrider, and a warlock. They will have the assistance of an NPC pirate crew that consists of the captain (an ECL 11 bard/marshal/legendary captain), the first mate (an ECL 11 ninja/scarlet corsair), the big guy (an ECL 8 barbarian/war hulk), the ship’s mage (an ECL 6 warmage), and a handful of other crew members who probably won’t matter in a fight against such creatures.

The PCs plan to suppress temporarily the overseer’s domination of the blue with protection from evil spells and make 11-min.-at-a-time alliances with the blue and its army in hopes that the goblins’ll wreck a few eyeball monsters for the PCs.

As a being of vast intellect (Int 20!), the overseer has likely considered this eventuality and has contingencies for its contingencies for when the goblins eventually revolt. (Some of these contingencies might involve its major creation eye ray? See below.)

I expect that the actual beholder will be slain—perhaps by the overseer itself—in the ensuing goblin-beholder(kin) battle. (The overseer’s plan all along to remove its potential rival anyway.) So after the party dispatches the remaining lesser beholderkin, it’ll be time for the PCs to go mano-a-ojo against the overseer itself.

And it’s for this final battle that I want to maximize the overseer’s tactics. I can do that for everything that the overseer can do (which is a lot) except that I’m struggling with the overseer’s major creation eye ray.

The description of the overseer’s major creation eye ray says that an overseer uses it to create for itself or its minions useful miscellaneous gear. Lords of Madness has some beholder magic items, but it makes no suggestions as to what sort of mundane items an overseer would find useful, be it in battle or just to have sitting around for anywhere from over a day (if vegetable matter) to only 90 seconds (if a rare metal). (Its caster level for its eye rays is 14.)

An RPGNet thread has a list of 101 uses for the major creation spell, but many of those suggestions assume a mundane humanoid is employing the spell rather than an extremely powerful magical tree-eyeball monster.

How would an overseer in this situation employ optimally its major creation eye ray?

Note: an overseer’s major creation eye ray is a supernatural ability which requires a full round action (which replaces the standard 10 minute casting time of the spell). Since the eye rays are supernatural, they cannot be disrupted and never require concentration checks. So, I am mainly looking for uses during combat.

Is this (slightly revised) conversion of a 5e homebrew race in line with the power of “strong” (but still LA+0) 3.5e races?

I found a 5e “Anime Girl” race on dandwiki.com. Realistically most “anime girls” are just humans with plenty of class levels, but for the sake of general memery with some friends, I wanted to try converting the first listed subrace to 3.5e.

The Preface

I have come to understand that if you follow the link and read the name of the subrace I’m trying to convert, it’s a word that may raise some flags. It is not–and was never–my intention to sexualize anyone with the content of this question, nor the plans behind it. My friend group uses that term entirely wholesomely, unlike what (from a quick Google search) appears to be the case for the world at large. Because I use it and hear it used in a non-sexual context, I had forgotten that it even had such a disgusting connotation.

If I had specced more into Wisdom then maybe I would’ve looked more into the word and confirmed its inappropriateness for general use, but it didn’t even cross my mind–however, now I know. I apologize for using it in the previous version of this post, and for any feathers I may have ruffled by doing so. For the rest of the question, I’ll instead refer to the 5e subrace–and, by extension, 3.5e version of the race–as “Short Anime Girl”.

Link to the race/subrace

The Goal

Despite how it may seem not-so-serious, I’d still like for the race to be reasonably well-balanced and completely usable as an actual race–preferably closer to the high-tier options like dwarves and humans, but without being too powerful to be considered LA+0. If it falls a little short, that’s fine, but if it’s like kobolds or half-orcs which receive very little benefit compared to their drawbacks (especially relative to other races), then it could probably stand to be buffed.

Ideally, I want to keep the race as close to the source as possible, so as to just make a “3.5e version” of the 5e race rather than inventing anything too new. The original has seen numerous revisions, so I took the page’s entire history as valid inspiration, but I tried not to add or alter anything unless it was based on something that the 5e version of the race has actually mentioned at some point.

The Changes

The 5e version currently gives +1 to Charisma from the base race, and +1 to three other ability scores of the player’s choice from the subrace. Previous versions of the subrace only gave Charisma bonuses of varying sizes. Early versions of the race came with a Strength penalty but very large bonuses to other scores. Most versions of the subrace also imposed disadvantage on Strength rolls. All this in mind, I gave the race +2 Charisma, -2 Strength. The DMG says this is a highly-unfavorable set of modifiers, but the general consensus among players seems to be that such weighting is incorrect. The 5e race seems like one of its major benefits is having above-average total ability score bonuses, but aside from stuff like Lesser Planetouched, I think every 3.5e LA+0 race has net-zero ability score modifiers, so that’s the convention I followed.

The subrace has a size of Small, which I kept. Some versions have a walk speed of 25 feet, while others do not modify the race’s 30-foot speed. Specific beats general, and small/slow races in 3.5e tend to have a land speed of 20 feet, so I went with that. Most versions of the subrace have a carrying capacity increased to that of a Large creature, though. This seems like quite a huge jump, considering (or perhaps to counter) the reduced Strength, so I made the target carrying limit that of a Medium creature. 3.5e’s Powerful Build seems to do everything but increase carry limits, so I instead translated this carrying boost into allowing weapons and lifting/carrying limits as if the race were Medium.

Almost every version of the 5e race has had proficiency in Charisma (Persuasion) checks. Most versions of the subrace also gained proficiency in Charisma (Deception) checks as well as advantage on “Charisma and Persuasion checks”, despite having disadvantage on Charisma (Intimidation) checks. The current version replaces all these advantage/disadvantage traits with a limited-uses-per-day advantage on Charisma (Persuasion) checks. All in all, I took the idea of advantage on “Charisma…checks” and went with a +2 racial bonus on Charisma-based skills that involve interaction with intelligent creatures, with the exception of Intimidation, which gets a -2 racial penalty. I don’t know of any other races with racial skill penalties, but +2 to skills is quite common.

Another feature which has been universal among versions of the 5e race is awkward fall. In most versions this has been an action which damages the user and knocks her prone, while forcing the target to make an (untyped) saving throw or also take damage and fall prone. The most recent version clears up the appropriately-awkward wording, but attaches the feature to an optional part of the Attack action. I’m not aware of anything in 3.5e that causes you to take damage based on your own Strength modifier (which all versions of the 5e feature have done, despite the fact that that’s a lot of damage in a system where falling 10 feet deals just 1d6), but there is the bull rush special attack. So I just made an alternative to bull rushing, which knocks the user prone and–if successful–knocks the target prone, as well.

Almost all versions of the 5e race have had a trait which wanted slight reflavoring for the subrace. When the character is dealt bludgeoning damage, the attack “bounces off” and deals damage to the attacker. It’s unclear whether this is meant to negate the attack, but that would be extremely powerful. Instead, I simply gave the race DR 2/piercing or slashing (where 2 is based on the 1d4 recoil damage of the original)

Lastly, many versions of the 5e subrace have had a trait which has some implications that aren’t relevant to the 3.5e short anime girl race–and, if read literally, is far too powerful for any LA+0 racial trait, anyway. The name of the trait has to do with the idea of other creatures breaking rules in a not-okay way, but I figured it might work if I flipped it entirely, so that the trait instead allows the short anime girl herself to “break some rules” in a way that makes sense for the race:

3.5e (unlike 5e, AFAIK) generally requires characters to be adults (which, as with the 5e anime girl race at large, happens at the same age as for humans). However, there are lots of examples of characters–never mind just short girls–in anime becoming adventurers (even in “difficult” professions like wizard or monk) at any age, so it made sense to allow class levels regardless of age. It’s also particularly common for anime characters (short girls included) to live for hundreds or thousands of years. The current version of the 5e race imposes the same lifespan as humans, but earlier versions of the race said they “will live for however long they will”, which isn’t very clear but seems to imply that they can either will themselves to live, or are able to live until killed. Considering either reading of this phrase, getting rid of the maximum age made sense–in which case, it seemed too powerful to allow mental scores to accrue bonuses without penalties (but immortal characters in media seem none the weaker for their age, so physical age penalties didn’t make sense either), so I removed age-related ability score changes entirely, à la the Endless trait from Dragon Magazine. D&D Wiki has another race with many similarities to short anime girls (but which is pretty overpowered and wouldn’t lend itself to being converted to a LA+0 3.5e race) that has a trait which also gives an indefinite lifespan, so I took the new name from that, discarding any of the actual effects/flavor of the 5e subrace’s trait.

As for the last bits that all 3.5e races require: Common and “Senpai”(Japanese) are Automatic Languages, just like the 5e race. In 5e, Senpai can be traded out depending on the character’s appearance, but I don’t know of any 3.5e races that allow such language options. The race has any normal Bonus Languages to match the 5e version’s freely-chosen extra language. Also, any class can be a Favored Class, since 5e doesn’t have multiclass penalties.

The Result

Short Anime Girl Traits

• +2 Charisma, -2 Strength.

• Small: As a Small creature, a short anime girl gains a +1 size bonus to Armor Class, a +1 size bonus on attack rolls, and a +4 size bonus on Hide checks. However, short anime girls can use weapons designed for creatures one size larger without penalty, and their lifting and carrying limits are treated as if they were one size larger.

• Short anime girl base land speed is 20 feet.

• +2 racial bonus on Bluff, Diplomacy, Disguise, Gather Information, and Perform checks.

• -2 racial penalty on Intimidate checks.

• Awkward Fall: When a short anime girl performs a bull rush, she can choose to turn the action into an awkward fall, gaining a +4 bonus on the Strength check. If the awkward fall attempt is successful, the defender moves back a maximum of 5 feet and falls prone. Regardless of the result, the short anime girl then falls prone.

• Protective Softness: Short anime girl have damage reduction 2/piercing or slashing.

• Limited Immortality: Short anime girls can take class levels at any age. They receive no bonuses or penalties due to age, and won’t die of old age.

• Automatic Languages: Common and Senpai. Bonus Languages: Any (other than secret languages, such as Druidic).

• Favored Class: Any. When determining whether a multiclass short anime girl takes an experience point penalty, her highest-level class does not count.

The… Problems?

Most of these features seem relatively minor to me, but many of them are things which don’t really have much precedent that I’m aware of when it comes to LA+0 races.

As such, I can’t decide if the race is super weak (the ability score modifiers are supposedly quite poor and no number of years will further increase Charisma, awkward fall is largely inconsequential–especially for a Small race, which also has to deal with reduced speed, and the race doesn’t have too many useful features going for it) or super strong (Small size but with Medium weapons/carrying gives powerful bonuses at little cost, the wide range of skill bonuses are very useful in urban adventures, inflicting prone every turn is too dominant or synergizes too well with some particular Feat, damage reduction increases survivability too much or is out-of-line with anything any other race receives, or there’s some unforeseen consequence to being able to adventure at any age).

So, as boring a phrase as I’m sure this may sound here… “Is this race balanced?”

dnd 3.5e – Beholderkin Overseer’s Major Creation: Can it be used offensively?

According to Lords of Madness, the Beholderkin Overseer’s Major Creation eye ray requires a full round action to use (instead of the standard 10 minute casting time). It has a range of 180 ft. (instead of the standard Close range). But, it says that, “It has no offensive function”.

Does this mean the overseer should not use the eye ray offensively? Or does it mean it cannot use it offensively? For example, the overseer could create 14 cubic feet of platinum 180 feet in the air above an enemy. Since it is a supernatural ability to create, it cannot be prevented except by killing the overseer. At the end of the round, 18,000 lbs of platinum appears in midair and begins falling. Was this possible? Is this an “offensive function” that the overseer cannot make use of?

Can the overseer create mundane weapons? Or would that be considered an “offensive function”? For instance, in combat, could the overseer create an Adamantine weapon and use its telekinesis to sunder every weapon the party has?

I am not looking for RAI, as this creature is too open to make that determination. By an RAW reading, should I assume that any offensive purpose is somehow impossible for the overseer? What about creating traps out of combat? Or is that simply fluff text, and the creators never really gave it enough thought to realize it has a ton of offensive potential?

This question is related to, but a separate question from this one: here.

dnd 3.5e – Wildshape (3.5) interaction with craven & rend?

Rend is really weird: despite being a kind of “bonus damage,” it is worded as though it was a separate attack, albeit one that doesn’t involve an attack roll. It even says “This attack” to refer to itself in the description.

If rend is a separate attack, and the rend damage is applied to a character denied their Dexterity bonus to AC, then sudden strike or sneak attack damage should apply: both say that “the attack” deals the extra damage in this circumstance (sneak attack says the attack also gets this bonus when flanking). There’s nothing about needing an attack roll for this.

And if you are adding your extra damage from sudden strike or sneak attack, you should be increasing that damage by your level if you have Craven.

Is this reasonable? By definition, when you trigger rend, you have already struck (and applied your extra damage) multiple times already. Narratively, rend seems much more like bonus damage than it does a separate attack, particularly given the absence of an attack roll.

On the other hand, this is a character who has potentially nerfed their druid spellcasting and wild shape forms getting sudden strike, and who has equally nerfed their sudden strike damage getting wild shape. Sudden strike, in particular, is a really poor form of bonus damage, being difficult to trigger. This does not seem like a particularly high-optimization approach, which might encourage me to throw the character a bone and let rend apply sudden strike (and Craven) again. But you know your table better than we ever can, and my recommendation is (as always) that you do whatever is best for your game. If another application of sudden strike and Craven is going to chew through monsters too quickly/make this character too dominant/let them have too much spotlight, then don’t allow it.


Is the answer any different if he had sneak attack instead of sudden strike?

Well, the obvious difference is that the damage would trigger while flanking, instead of only when the target is denied Dexterity to AC.

Beyond that, strictly speaking, sudden strike doesn’t qualify for or trigger the use of Craven, because Complete Adventurer and Complete Scoundrel say

For the purpose of qualifying for feats, prestige classes, and similar options that require a minimum number of extra damage dice, treat the ninja’s sudden strike ability as the equivalent of sneak attack.

(Complete Adventurer pg. 8, Complete Scoundrel pg. 25)

Craven doesn’t require a certain number of extra damage dice, it just requires “sneak attack class feature.” Since that’s not a minimum number of extra damage dice, this rule doesn’t apply. This is stupid and an oversight, and should be ignored by any reasonable DM, but you asked.

Is this conversion of a 5e homebrew race in line with the power of “strong” (but still LA+0) 3.5e races?

I found this 5e “Anime Girl” race. Realistically most “anime girls” are just humans with plenty of class levels, but for the sake of general memery, I wanted to try converting the loli subrace to 3.5e.

The Goal

Despite how it may seem not-so-serious, I’d still like for the race to be reasonably well-balanced and completely usable as an actual race–preferably closer to the high-tier options like dwarves and humans, but without being too powerful to be considered LA+0. If it falls a little short, that’s fine, but if it’s like kobolds or half-orcs which receive very little benefit compared to their drawbacks (especially relative to other races), then it could probably stand to be buffed.

Ideally, I want to keep the race as close to the source as possible, so as to just make a “3.5e version” of the 5e race rather than inventing anything too new. The original has seen numerous revisions, so I took the page’s entire history as valid inspiration, but I tried not to add or alter anything unless it was based on something that the 5e version of the race has actually mentioned at some point.

The Changes

The 5e version currently gives +1 to Charisma from the base race, and +1 to three other ability scores of the player’s choice from the subrace. Previous versions of the subrace only gave Charisma bonuses of varying sizes. Early versions of the race came with a Strength penalty but very large bonuses to other scores. Most versions of the subrace also imposed disadvantage on Strength rolls. All this in mind, I gave the race +2 Charisma, -2 Strength. The DMG says this is a highly-unfavorable set of modifiers, but the general consensus among players seems to be that such weighting is incorrect. The 5e race seems like one of its major benefits is having above-average total ability score bonuses, but aside from stuff like Lesser Planetouched, I think every 3.5e LA+0 race has net-zero ability score modifiers, so that’s the convention I followed.

The subrace has a size of Small, which I kept. Some versions have a walk speed of 25 feet, while others do not modify the race’s 30-foot speed. Specific beats general, and small races in 3.5e generally have a land speed of 20 feet, so I went with that. Most versions of the subrace have a carrying capacity increased to that of a Large creature, though. This seems like quite a huge jump, considering (or perhaps to counter) the reduced Strength, so I made the target carrying limit that of a Medium creature. 3.5e’s Powerful Build seems to do everything but increase carry limits, so I instead translated this carrying boost into allowing weapons and lifting/carrying limits as if the race were Medium.

Almost every version of the 5e race has had proficiency in Charisma (Persuasion) checks. Most versions of the subrace also gained proficiency in Charisma (Deception) checks as well as advantage on “Charisma and Persuasion checks”, despite having disadvantage on Charisma (Intimidation) checks. The current version replaces all these advantage/disadvantage traits with a limited-uses-per-day advantage on Charisma (Persuasion) checks. All in all, I took the idea of advantage on “Charisma…checks” and went with a +2 racial bonus on Charisma-based skills that involve interaction with intelligent creatures, with the exception of Intimidation, which gets a -2 racial penalty.

Another feature which has been universal among versions of the 5e race is awkward fall. In most versions this has been an action which damages the user and knocks her prone, while forcing the target to make an (untyped) saving throw or also take damage and fall prone. The most recent version clears up the appropriately-awkward wording, but attaches the feature to an optional part of the Attack action. I’m not aware of anything in 3.5e that causes you to take damage based on your own Strength modifier (which all versions of the 5e feature have done, despite the fact that that’s a lot of damage in a system where falling 10 feet deals just 1d6), but there is the bull rush special attack. So I just made an alternative to bull rushing, which knocks the user prone and–if successful–knocks the target prone, as well.

Almost all versions of the 5e race have had a trait which wanted slight reflavoring for the subrace. When the character is dealt bludgeoning damage, the attack “bounces off” and deals damage to the attacker. It’s unclear whether this is meant to negate the attack, but that would be extremely powerful. Instead, I simply gave the race DR 2/piercing or slashing (where 2 is based on the 1d4 recoil damage of the original)

Lastly, many versions of the subrace have had a trait which probably existed mostly as a joke, but has the potential to be incredibly powerful if played straight: while in a city, any creature that feels sexually attracted to the character is “instantly” arrested. Gating in a zelekhut would be pretty funny, but doesn’t seem reasonable for a racial trait. Seeing as how the trait is called “Illegal”, I retooled its effects, so as to bypass a couple 3.5e systems in a way that I thought made sense: The character can ignore most things in the Random Starting Ages and Aging Effects tables. 3.5e (unlike 5e, AFAIK) generally requires characters to be adults, but lolis in media are frequently not adults, so it made sense to waive that restriction. The hundred-(or thousand-)year-old loli is also a common trope, and earlier versions of the 5e race said they “will live for however long they will”, which isn’t very clear but seems to imply that they can either will themselves to live, or are able to live until killed. Either way, getting rid of the maximum age made sense for that–in which case, it seemed too powerful to allow mental scores to accrue bonuses without penalties (but immortal lolis in media seem none the weaker for their age, so physical age penalties didn’t make sense either), so I removed age-related ability score changes entirely, à la the Endless trait from Dragon Magazine.

As for the last bits that all 3.5e races require: Common and “Senpai”(Japanese) are Automatic Languages, just like the 5e race. In 5e, Senpai can be traded out depending on the character’s appearance, but I don’t know of any 3.5e races that allow such language options. The race has any normal Bonus Languages to match the 5e version’s freely-chosen extra language. Also, any class can be a Favored Class, since 5e doesn’t have multiclass penalties.

The Result

Loli Traits

• +2 Charisma, -2 Strength.

• Small: As a Small creature, a loli gains a +1 size bonus to Armor Class, a +1 size bonus on attack rolls, and a +4 size bonus on Hide checks. However, lolis can use weapons designed for creatures one size larger without penalty, and their lifting and carrying limits are treated as if they were one size larger.

• Loli base land speed is 20 feet.

• +2 racial bonus on Bluff, Diplomacy, Disguise, Gather Information, and Perform checks.

• -2 racial penalty on Intimidate checks.

• Awkward Fall: When a loli performs a bull rush, she can choose to turn the action into an awkward fall, gaining a +4 bonus on the Strength check. If the awkward fall attempt is successful, the defender moves back a maximum of 5 feet and falls prone. Regardless of the result, the loli then falls prone.

• Protective Softness: Lolis have damage reduction 2/piercing or slashing.

• Illegal (or Not): Lolis can take class levels at any age, even before reaching adulthood. If a loli reaches adulthood, she becomes a legal loli and will receive no bonuses or penalties due to age, and won’t die of old age.

• Automatic Languages: Common and Senpai. Bonus Languages: Any (other than secret languages, such as Druidic).

• Favored Class: Any. When determining whether a multiclass loli takes an experience point penalty, her highest-level class does not count.

The… Problems?

Most of these features seem relatively minor to me, but many of them are things which don’t really have much precedent that I’m aware of when it comes to LA+0 races.

As such, I can’t decide if the race is super weak (the ability score modifiers are supposedly quite poor and no number of years will further increase Charisma, awkward fall is largely inconsequential–especially for a Small race, which also has to deal with reduced speed, and the race doesn’t have too many useful features going for it) or super strong (Small size but with Medium weapons/carrying gives powerful bonuses at little cost, the wide range of skill bonuses are very useful in urban adventures, inflicting prone every turn is too dominant or synergizes too well with some particular Feat, damage reduction increases survivability too much or is out-of-line with anything any other race receives, or there’s some unforeseen consequence to being able to adventure at any age).

So, as boring a phrase as I’m sure this may sound here… “Is this race balanced?”

dnd 5e – Are these homebrew attempts at recreating some blast shape invocations from 3.5e balanced for 5e?

In D&D 3.5e, there were various “blast shape” invocations available to warlocks, five of which were included in the video game Neverwinter Nights 2 (which is based on 3.5e and is all I really know of 3.5e): Hideous Blow, Eldritch Spear, Eldritch Chain, Eldritch Cone and Eldritch Doom.

Now, I know that warlock invocations worked differently in 3.5e to 5e (primarily based on how they’re implemented in the video game compared to how I know they work in 5e), but I wanted to convert some of these into 5e Eldritch Invocations.

Arguably, Hideous Blow could be thought of as being roughly equivalent to Eldritch Smite from 5e (XGtE, p. 56; even though it doesn’t actually modify eldritch blast), and Eldritch Spear already exists in 5e (as a way to increase the range of eldritch blast), so the remaining three are the ones I have attempted to convert.

Here are my attempts at each of the three invocations, with some commentary below each one to explain my thought process and design decisions.


Eldritch Chain

Prerequisite: 5th level, eldritch blast cantrip

This blast shape invocation allows you to improve your eldritch blast by turning it into an arc of energy that “jumps” from the first target to others. When you cast eldritch blast, on a hit, you can choose to target an additional creature of your choice within 30 feet of the target with the same beam. Make a ranged attack roll against the additional creature, which takes half of the damage dealt to the target on a hit. You can only use this invocation once per turn with one beam, although you may choose to do so after you know whether a beam hits its target.

When you reach 11th level, your chain can target two additional creatures, both of whom take half of the damage dealt to the original target on a hit, and when you reach 17th level, your chain can target three additional creatures, all of whom take half of the damage dealt to the original target on a hit. You choose the targets in succession, and each subsequent target must be within 30 feet of the previous target of the chain (not the original target). The chain cannot target the same creature more than once (although it can target a creature hit with a different beam that turn), and on a miss, the chain ends and you cannot target any further creatures with the chain.

In NWN2 (and presumably 3.5e), Eldritch Blast only ever fired one beam, and Eldritch Chain was a way of making that hit more enemies, but each additional enemy only took half damage. Considering that eldritch blast in 5e can target multiple creatures already, I wanted to come up with something that felt unique.

I considered having each beam jump to only one addition target to deal half damage, but then a level 17 warlock could hit eight creatures with this thing, which seemed overpowered (and wouldn’t “look right” compared to what it looked like in NWN2, where the one beam would jump to different targets, not four different beams that each jump to one other target).

In the end, I decided to have it target a few additional creatures, but for half damage (Agonizing Blast would be taken into consideration for the original target’s damage, so isn’t added again to each of the chain’s targets), which is the same as in 3.5e, but only on one of the beams, not each beam. Yes, this still increases the number of creatures you can hit each turn, and therefore increases the damage output of eldritch blast, but hopefully the half damage mitigates that somewhat; also, you’ve still got to roll to hit them, so there’s a chance that you’ll simply miss and then it’s no different to not having the invocation at all.

That said, it’s still a clear improvement on RAW eldritch blast, so if it needs to be nerfed further, I could reduce the range to 10 feet or something, although unless the targets are spread out, this won’t really matter. Losing the second paragraph when you reach higher levels is also something that can be dropped, but hopefully not since that would also nerf the look/flavour of Eldritch Chain. I’d still like to keep it as an “at-will” ability, but increasing the damage output of a cantrip is pretty big, so another way to nerf it is to say that you must use it or Agonizing Blast (per beam, so your non-chain beams can still use Agonizing Blast). Depends on how powerful it is as-written above…

Also, I did in fact mean “spell attack”, as Cubic’s answer points out (I would update the above, but then the Q and A are out of sync, but for any future answers, yes, I did mean “spell attack”).


Eldritch Cone

Prerequisite: 12th level, eldritch blast cantrip

This blast shape invocation allows you to invoke your eldritch blast as a 15-foot cone. Each creature within the cone must make a Dexterity saving throw. A creature takes 1d10 force damage on a failed save, or half as much damage on a successful one.

For Eldritch Cone, I’ve simply used the standard cone spell implementation, like burning hands, but it only does the same amount of damage as one beam, to balance out the fact that you can hit multiple enemies with it. My intention is for Agonizing Blast to be included in this damage, so it’s actually 1d10 + 5 force damage for an optimised warlock.

I originally had it as a 30-foot cone that did 3d10 force damage, same as the normal damage output for eldritch blast (which would have increased to 4d10), but that was so powerful that I could only justify that as being once per rest or something, and I’d prefer to keep these as being something that can be used “at-will” to keep that 3.5e feel, so hopefully having a cone shaped cantrip is useful enough to justify only dealing 1d10 damage in a 15-foot cone to be balanced; I’m not sure if even having a cone cantrip is inherently overpowered, or whether the small damage and range somehow makes it underpowered, but hopefully it’s balanced.


Eldritch Doom

Prerequisite: 18th level, eldritch blast cantrip

This blast shape invocation allows you to invoke your eldritch blast as the dreaded eldritch doom. This causes bolts of mystical power to lash out and savage all targets within a 20 foot area originating from a point you can see within 120 feet of you. Each creature within that area must make a Dexterity saving throw. A creature takes 1d10 force damage on a failed save, or half as much damage on a successful one.

For Eldritch Doom, I’ve implemented it as basically a force fireball, dealing the same damage as a single beam. As above, my intention is for Agonizing Blast to be included in this damage, so it’s actually 1d10 + 5 force damage for an optimised warlock.

I originally had it at 4d10, same as all four beams combined, and had the range at 30-feet, but this would be massively overpowered without a “once per rest” cap on it, but these caps kinda go against what blast shape invocations were about, so as before, I hope that the AOE shape alone is worth an invocation, since you now have a weak at-will force fireball, but without that being inherently overpowered.


Are these three invocations balanced when compared to the other Eldritch Invocations? Specifically, do they make eldritch blast overpowered in a way that dealing reduced damage and taking up a choice of an Eldritch Invocation doesn’t counterbalance?

dnd 3.5e – Looking for a 3.5 reference to a Monster Harvester’s Handbook

Back in the day, someone had created a handbook for harvesting parts from monsters. They went through every monster in the SRD and chose parts (and fairly reasonable prices for those parts). I was wondering if anyone knew of a link to the old material. I can only find links to 5e versions, which is not what I am looking for.

I believe there were multiple versions, and the one I vaguely recollect was a Word document. I also think there was an Excel version, IIRC, I was not as fond of that one (I do not recall why, as this was many years ago).

dnd 3.5e – How does the spell Siphon work for a caster who is both spontaneous and able to cast prepared spells?

The description of the 3rd-level Sor/Wiz spell siphon (trans) (Complete Scoundrel 103) makes no mention of any restrictions on what spells it can replace due to the source of the siphon spell’s casting. That is, the spell doesn’t seem to care if it were cast as a prepared spell or if it were cast without preparation. Instead, the description says that the siphon spell effect can replace only expended arcane prepared spells (like those of a wizard) and expended arcane spell slots of a caster that casts spells without preparation (like those of a bard or sorcerer).

Further, with the spell’s description including tightly knit language that accommodates casters whose spells are both prepared and not prepared, it seems reasonable to allow a multiclass caster who’s capable of both kinds of casting to pick to allocate the spell’s effect appropriately however she wants. For example, I’d have no problem in my campaign allowing a sorcerer/wizard to cast the spell siphon and use appropriately the effect to replace expended prepared spells, expended spell slots, or both in some combination.

Were the spell to check the caster’s magic style—with or without preparation—, activating a wand of siphon would be complicated as the spell’s effect would then possibly be contingent upon the creator of the wand of siphon instead of the effect being contingent upon the spell itself. Under such a reading, a typical wand of siphon would default to creation by a wizard—as that would give it the lowest caster level—, so a sorcerer could still activate such a wand but receive no benefit. That’d be weird and would perhaps make the siphon spell unique among 3.5‘s official spells.