Python – Minimum main program?

I was recently reviewing the CPython source code and noticed something quite intriguing:

/ * Minimum main program - everything is loaded from the library * /

#include "Python.h"
#include "pycore_pylifecycle.h"

#ifdef MS_WINDOWS
In t
wmain (int argc, wchar_t ** argv)
{
returns Py_Main (argc, argv);
}
#plus
In t
main (int argc, char ** argv)
{
returns _Py_UnixMain (argc, argv);
}
#determinate if

The main function simply calls a different function as indicated in the previous comment

Minimum main program

And those two functions that were called (Py_Main Y _Py_UnixMain) neither do they seem to perform drastically different or very complex operations, and eventually they call the same function (pymain_main):

In t
Py_Main (int argc, wchar_t ** argv)
{
_PyMain pymain = _PyMain_INIT;
pymain.use_bytes_argv = 0;
pymain.argc = argc;
pymain.wchar_argv = argv;

return pymain_main (& pymain);
}

In t
_Py_UnixMain (int argc, char ** argv)
{
_PyMain pymain = _PyMain_INIT;
pymain.use_bytes_argv = 1;
pymain.argc = argc;
pymain.bytes_argv = argv;

return pymain_main (& pymain);
}

It seems that these operations could be done very easily in the principal or wmain functions

My question is whether there is a clear benefit of this choice from the point of view of design and structure. Why the developers of CPython, probably, decided effectively create a new main function Instead of using the standard? Does it facilitate maintenance or debugging?

Link to the main
Link to Py_Main and _Py_UnixMain